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Ein Grundlagentext zur Praxis und Ästhetik des japanischen Nō-Theaters. Zweisprachige Ausgabe. Übersetzt, philosophisch erläutert und herausgegeben von Ryōsuke Ōhashi, Rolf Elberfeld und Leon Krings
Das Buch bietet eine philosophisch kommentierte Übersetzung des altjapanischen Textes von Zeami zur Praxis und Ästhetik des Nō-Theaters.
Zeami beschreibt nicht nur die Praxis des Schauspielers in verschiedenen Aspekten, sondern entwickelt auch zentrale ästhetische Kategorien für die Rezeption des Nō-Theaters. Die Übersetzung wird ergänzt durch interpretierende Aufsätze zu Themen wie der Maske im Nō-Theater, dem Gebrauch des Körpers und einer Ästhetik des Atmens. Der Band liefert somit eine solide Grundlage für eine philosophisch-ästhetische Auseinandersetzung mit einer alten japanischen Schauspieltradition.
Through an innovative interdisciplinary reading and field research, Igor Chabrowski analyses the history of the development of opera in Sichuan, arguing that opera serves as a microcosm of the profound transformation of modern Chinese culture between the 18th century and 1950s. He investigates the complex path of opera over this course of history: exiting the temple festivals, becoming a public obsession on commercial stages, and finally being harnessed to partisan propaganda work. The book analyzes the process of cross-regional integration of Chinese culture and the emergence of the national opera genre. Moreover, opera is shown as an example of the culture wars that raged inside China’s popular culture.
Philanthropy, the Arts, and the State in Leipzig (1750-1918)
This book offers a novel approach to the history of high culture and new perspectives on the history of civil society in provincial Germany. It makes the concept of place a central means for understanding how art culture was defined, consumed, and, importantly, distributed over the course of the long nineteenth century. It shows how “temples of culture” come to be built where they were built. It further demonstrates who participated in their planning, funding, construction, and ultimate evolution into public institutions, highlighting underexamined links between the history of art culture and that of urban history and civil society.
Transmissions, Receptions, and Regional Contexts
Japan on the Jesuit Stage offers a comprehensive overview of the representations of Japan in early modern European Neo-Latin school theater. The chapters in the volume catalog and analyze representative plays which were produced in the hundreds all over Europe, from the Iberian Peninsula to present-day Croatia and Poland.

Taking full account of existing scholarship, but also introducing a large amount of previously unknown primary material, the contributions by European and Japanese researchers significantly expand the horizon of investigation on early modern European theatrical reception of East Asian elements and will be of particular interest to students of global history, Neo-Latin, and theater studies.
This co-edited volume offers new insights into the complex relations between Brussels and Vienna in the turn-of-the-century period (1880-1930). Through archival research and critical methods of cultural transfer as a network, it contributes to the study of Modernism in all its complexity.
Seventeen chapters analyse the interconnections between new developments in literature (Verhaeren, Musil, Zweig), drama (Maeterlinck, Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal), visual arts (Minne, Khnopff, Masereel, Child Art), architecture (Hoffmann, Van de Velde), music (Schönberg, Ysaÿe, Kreisler, Kolisch), as well as psychoanalysis (Varendonck, Anna Freud) and café culture. Austrian and Belgian artists played a crucial role within the complex, rich, and conflictual international networks of people, practices, institutions, and metropoles in an era of political, social and technological change and intense internationalization.

Contributors: Sylvie Arlaud, Norbert Bachleitner, Anke Bosse, Megan Brandow-Faller, Alexander Carpenter, Piet Defraeye, Clément Dessy, Aniel Guxholli, Birgit Lang, Helga Mitterbauer, Chris Reyns-Chikuma, Silvia Ritz, Hubert Roland, Inga Rossi-Schrimpf, Sigurd Paul Scheichl, Guillaume Tardif, Hans Vandevoorde.
Author: Lou Prendergast
In Conscious Theatre Practice: Yoga, Meditation, and Performance, Lou Prendergast charts a theatre research project in which the notion of Self-realisation and related contemplative practices, including Bikram Yoga and Vipassana meditation, are applied to performance. Coining the term ‘Conscious Theatre Practice’, Prendergast presents the scripts of three publicly presented theatrical performances, examined under the ‘three C’s’ research model: Conscious Craft (writing, directing, performance; Conscious Casting; Conscious Collaborations.
The findings of this autobiographical project fed into a working manifesto for socially engaged theatre company, Black Star Projects. Along the way, the research engages with methodological frameworks that include practice-as-research, autoethnography, phenomenology and psychophysical processes, as well immersive yoga and meditation practice; while race, class and gender inequalities underpin the themes of the productions.
Young People, Applied Theatre, and Education about Race
This innovative project wrapped research around a youth theatre project. Young people of colour and from refugee backgrounds developed a sustained provocation for the people of Geelong, a large regional centre in Australia. The packed public performance—at the biggest venue in town—challenged locals to rethink assumptions. The audience response was insightful and momentous. The companion workshops for schools had profound impact with adolescent audiences. Internationally, this book connects with artistic, educational, and research communities, offering a substantial contribution to understandings of racism. This book is a provocative, transdisciplinary meditation on race, culture, the arts and change.
Widely read as school texts, the comedies by the Roman dramatist Terence have come down to us in hundreds of medieval copies. Fourteen of the manuscripts produced between 800 and 1200 were given some kind of illustration. In this volume, Beatrice Radden Keefe explores the semiotics of the imagery found in the earliest illustrated Terence manuscripts, and its relationship to the iconography of comedy and theatre from antiquity. She examines six further manuscripts to show how later illustrators abandoned this imagery to varying degrees, finding new emphases and creating new layers of meaning. Illustrators of Terence, it is demonstrated here, brought a range of interests to illustrating the comedies, clarifying their narrative, incorporating social commentary and moralisation, and linking them with Christian allegorical traditions.
Beckett’s Voices / Voicing Beckett uses ‘voice’ as a prism to investigate Samuel Beckett’s work across a range of texts, genres, and performance cultures. Twenty-one contributors, all members of the Samuel Beckett Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research, discuss the musicality of Beckett’s voices, the voice as ‘absent other’, the voices of the vulnerable, the cinematic voice, and enacted voices in performance and media. The volume engages not only with Beckett’s history and legacy, but also with many of the central theoretical issues in theatre studies as a whole. Featuring testimonies from Beckett practitioners as well as emerging and established scholars, it is emblematic of the thriving and diverse community that is twenty-first century Beckett Studies.

Contributors: Svetlana Antropova, Linda Ben-Zvi, Jonathan Bignell, Llewellyn Brown, Julie Campbell, Thirthankar Chakraborty, Laurens De Vos, Everett C. Frost, S. E. Gontarski, Mariko Hori Tanaka, Nicholas E. Johnson, Kumiko Kiuchi, Anna McMullan, Melissa Nolan, Cathal Quinn, Arthur Rose, Teresa Rosell Nicolás, Jürgen Siess, Anna Sigg, Yoshiko Takebe, Michiko Tsushima