Domestic Space and Genre in Qing Vernacular Literature
In Woman Rules Within: Domestic Space and Genre in Qing Vernacular Literature, Jessica Dvorak Moyer compares depictions of household space and women’s networks in texts across a range of genres from about 1600 to 1800 C.E. Analyzing vernacular transformations of classical source texts as well as vernacular stories and novels, Moyer shows that vernacular genres use expansive detail about architectural space and the everyday domestic world to navigate a variety of ideological tensions, particularly that between qing (emotion) and li (ritual propriety), and to flesh out characters whose actions challenge the norms of gendered spatial practice even as they ultimately uphold the gender order. Woman Rules Within contributes a new understanding of the role of colloquial language in late imperial literature.
Author: Eyal Aviv
In Differentiating the Pearl from the Fish-Eye, Eyal Aviv offers an account of Ouyang Jingwu (1871-1943), a leading intellectual who revived the Buddhist scholastic movement during the early Republican period in China.

Ouyang believed that authentic Indian Buddhism was an alternative to the prevalent Chinese Buddhist doctrines of his time. Aviv shows how Ouyang’s rhetoric of authenticity won the movement well-known admirers but also influential critics. This debate shaped modern intellectual history in China and has lost none of its relevancy today.
Author: Yun Zhang
In Engendering the Woman Question, Zhang Yun adopts a new approach to examining the early Chinese women’s periodical press. Rather than seeing this new print and publishing genre as a gendered site coded as either “feminine” or “masculine,” this book approaches it as a mixed-gender public space where both men and women were intellectually active and involved in dynamic interactions to determine the contours of their discursive encounters.

Drawing upon a variety of novel textual modes such as polemic essays, historical biography, public speech, and expository essays, this book opens a window onto men’s and women’s gender-specific approaches to a series of prominent topics central to the Chinese woman question in the early twentieth century.
Editor: Xiao Zhang
This volume of the Chinese Research Perspectives on the Environment series is a translation of Environmental Security in China, which features contributions from top researchers from Chinese universities, including the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. The ten articles following the introduction cover a range of environmental issues in four large categories with significant security implications: pollution, ecosystem deterioration, food and energy supply. In addition to long-standing environmental problems such as air, water and soil pollution, and grassland degradation, genetically modified (GM) foods, climate change and China’s energy dependence, which have taken on increasing urgency in recent years, are also discussed. Each chapter includes conceptual clarifications, historical overview, empirical analysis, case studies, international comparisons, and policy recommendations.
Global Perspectives on Biography in Public Cultures and Societies
Internationally acclaimed biographies are almost always written by British or American biographers. But what is the state of the art of biography in other parts of the world? Introduced by Richard Holmes, the volume Different Lives offers a global perspective: seventeen scholars vividly describe the biographical tradition in their countries of interest. They show how biography functions as a public genre, featuring specific societal issues and opinion-making. Indeed, the volume aims to answer the question: how can biography contribute to a better understanding of differences between societies and cultures? Special attention is given to the US, China and the Netherlands. Other contributions are on Australia, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Iceland, Iran, Italy, New Zealand, Spain, and South Africa.

"This book represents a much needed breakdown of the history and current status of Biography Studies throughout the world. Any educator teaching a course in higher education that includes Biography Studies should definitely consider this as a major text for inclusion." - Billy Tooma, film-maker and Assistant Professor, Wessex County College
"The rise of biography is the literary event of our time; Hamilton and Renders are its pioneer scholars, and their compelling primer is a mustread." - Joanny Moulin, Institut Universitaire de France, on Nigel Hamilton and Hans Renders, in: The ABC of Modern Biography (2018)
Thierry Meynard and Dawei Pan offer a highly detailed annotated translation of one of the major works of Giulio Aleni, a Jesuit missionary in China. Referred to by his followers as “Confucius from the West”, Aleni made his presence felt in the early modern encounter between China and Europe. The two translators outline the complexity of the intellectual challenges that Aleni faced and the extensive conceptual resources on which he built up a fine-grained framework with the aim of bridging the Chinese and Christian spiritual traditions.
Tibetan History under Mao Retold
Conflicting Memories is a study of how the Tibetan encounter with the Chinese state during the Maoist era has been recalled and reimagined by Chinese and Tibetan authors and artists since the late 1970s. Written by an international team of historians, anthropologists, and scholars of religion, literature and film, together with translated extracts from key interviews, biographies, fiction and films, it examines official histories and films, unofficial autobiographies, memoirs and novels as well as oral testimonies and writings by Buddhist adepts. The book explores what these revised versions of the past chose as their focus, which types of people produced them, and what aims they pursued in the production of new, post-Mao descriptions of Tibet under Chinese socialism.
Contributors include: Robert Barnett, Benno Weiner, Françoise Robin, Bianca Horlemann, Alice Travers, Alex Raymond, Chung Tsering, Dáša Pejchar Mortensen, Charlene Makley, Xénia de Heering, Nicole Willock, M. Maria Turek, Geoffrey Barstow, Gedun Rabsal, Heather Stoddard, Orgyen Nyima.
Author: Sheng Kai
Editor: Jinhua Chen
The goal of this book is to study the ways in which Chinese Buddhists expressed their religious faiths and how Chinese Buddhists interacted with society at large since the Northern and Southern dynasties (386-589), through the Ming (1368-1644) and the Qing (1644-1911), up to the Republican era (1912-1949). The book aims to summarize and present the historical trajectory of the Sinification of Buddhism in a new light, revealing the symbiotic relationship between Buddhist faith and Chinese culture. The book examines cases such as repentance, vegetarianism, charity, scriptural lecture, the act of releasing captive animals, the Bodhisattva faith, and mountain worship, from multiple perspectives such as textual evidence, historical circumstances, social life, as well as the intellectual background at the time.
This translated volume is based on the Chinese publication Green Book of Population and Labor (No. 18). It focuses on the new era of economic growth fueled primarily by innovation and entrepreneurship, and corresponding developments in China’s employment landscape. Chapter one offers an overview of China’s new economy. Chapter two examines emerging trends in both the labor and the job markets. Changes to labor relations under the new economy are discussed in chapter three, followed by two chapters that look closely at the role China’s largest online ride-hailing service provider has played in shaping the workforce and in job creation. The final chapter reports on current policy support for innovative industries, and makes recommendations.