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Author: Farabi Fakih
Academic Activism in the Neoliberal Era
Author: Philippe Peycam
Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History 16 (CMR 16) covering North America, South-East Asia, China, Japan and Australasia in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous leading scholars, CMR 16, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a basic tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section Editors: Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabe Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Radu Păun, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Mehdi Sajid, Cornelia Soldat, Karel Steenbrink, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel.
This book is the first comprehensive work on oriental Notodontidae (Lepidoptera) outside mainland Asia. The studied area includes also Borneo Island, the Malayan Peninsula, entire New Guinea with adjacent islands. All species are illustrated in both sexes with a total number of 1272 specimens on 51 colour plates. Genitalia photos of both sexes as well as detailed distribution maps are provided for each species.
The book deals in the first volume with 298 species and contains descriptions of 99 new notodontid taxa. A second volume will treat with the remaining 160 species and include also a comprehensive biogeographic analysis.
Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective elevates historical morpho-syntax to a research priority in the field of Southeast Asian language history, transcending the traditional focus on phonology and lexicon. The volume contains eleven chapters covering a wide range of aspects of diachronic Austroasiatic syntax, most of which contain new hypotheses, and several address topics that have never been dealt with before in print, such as clause structure and word order in the proto-language, and reconstruction of Munda morphology successfully integrating it into Austroasiatic language history. Also included is a list of proto-AA grammatical words with evaluative and contextualizing comments.

Abstract

Proto-AA function words are grouped by category (e.g. pronouns, locative terms, etc.) and evaluated for likelihood of proto-AA status. Statements are also provided for affixal and reduplicative morphology. The editors of this volume collaborated to create this Austroasiatic grammatical lexicon as a resource for the investigation of the history of PAA syntax. It began as a simple compilation of grammatical and grammaticalised items extracted from Shorto’s (2006) reconstruction of Proto-Austroasiatic/Mon-Khmer, and was then augmented with data from the SEAlang Mon-Khmer and Munda Languages Projects. Later, special sections on pronouns and morphology were added, extending beyond Shorto’s work with other published sources.

In: Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective

Abstract

The study of diachronic syntax includes all aspects of syntactic change caused by language internal and external factors, some of which are better studied and understood than others. While there is extensive literature on the effects of grammaticalization and areal convergence, little has been written in the field of syntactic reconstruction. This chapter briefly summarizes the history of AA studies and the state of the art of diachronic syntax, and presents a methodological framework within which the task of studying the development of AA clause structure can be approached, considering different aspects, both syntactic and semantic/pragmatic. The framework set out in this chapter can readily be adapted to other language groups and families.

In: Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective
In: Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective
Author: Mark Alves

Abstract

Syntactic data on several Vietic languages, combined with comparative Austroasiatic data and the history of language contact and typological convergence in Mainland Southeast Asia, lead to working hypotheses about early Vietic morphosyntax during initial contact with Sinitic around 2,200 years ago. Like other Austroasiatic languages and modern Minor Vietic languages, the non-tonal, polysyllabic, agglutinative Vietic was probably topic-prominent and verb-medial and utilized the middle voice, lacking both lexical and morphological means of marking passive voice. As for noun phrase structure, early Vietic likely lacked classifiers and had quantifiers after nouns, comparable to textual evidence of Old Khmer. While modifiers and determiners follow nouns in all described Vietic languages, quantification occurs either before or after head nouns in noun phrases, most likely as a result of language contact.

In: Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective
In: Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective