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Publication History and Catholic Missions in the Spanish World (Spain, New Spain, and the Philippines, 1597–1700)
In The Martyrs of Japan, Rady Roldán-Figueroa examines the role that Catholic missionary orders played in the dissemination of accounts of Christian martyrdom in Japan. The work combines several historiographical approaches, including publication history, history of missions, and “new” institutional history. The author offers an overarching portrayal of the writing, printing, and circulation of books of ‘Japano-martyrology.’
The book is organized into two parts. The first part, “Spirituality of Writing, Publication History, and Japano-martyrology,” addresses topics ranging from the historical background of Christianity in Japan to the publishers of Japano-martyrology. The second part, “Jesuits, Discalced Franciscans, and the Production of Japano-martyrology in the Early Modern Spanish World,” features closer analysis of selected works of Japano-martyrology by Jesuit and Discalced Franciscan writers.
Professor Alexander V. Vovin’s fruitful research has brought incomparable results to the fields of Asian linguistics and philology throughout the past four decades. In this volume, presented in honour of Professor Vovin’s 60th birthday, twenty-two authors present new research regarding Japanese, Korean, Turkish, Khitan, Yakut, Mongolian, Chinese, Hachijō, Ikema Miyakoan, Ainu, Okinawan, Nivkh, Eskimo-Aleut and other languages. The chapters are both a tribute to his research and a summary of the latest developments in the field.
An Environmental History of Japan’s Rivers, 1600–1930
In Turbulent Streams: An Environmental History of Japan’s Rivers, 1600–1930, Roderick I. Wilson describes how the rivers of Japan are both hydrologically and historically dynamic. Today, these waterways are slowed, channeled, diverted, and dammed by a myriad of levees, multiton concrete tetrapods, and massive multipurpose dams. In part, this intensive engineering arises from the waterways falling great elevations over short distances, flowing over unstable rock and soil, and receiving large quantities of precipitation during monsoons and typhoons. But this modern river regime is also the product of a history that narrowed both these waterways and people’s diverse interactions with them in the name of flood control. Neither a story of technological progress nor environmental decline, this history introduces the concept of environmental relations as a category of historical analysis both to explore these fluvial interactions and reveal underappreciated dimensions of Japanese history.
Uno Kōzō’s Theory of ‘Pure Capitalism’ in Light of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy
Value without Fetish presents the first in-depth English-language study of the influential Japanese economist Uno Kōzō‘s (1897-1977) theory of ‘pure capitalism’ in the light of the method and object of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy. A close analysis of the theories of value, production and reproduction, and crisis in Uno’s central texts from the 1930s to the 1970s reveals his departure from Marx’s central insights about the fetish character of the capitalist mode of production – a departure that Lange shows can be traced back to the failed epistemology of value developed in Uno’s earliest writings. By disavowing the complex relation between value and fetish that structures Marx’s critique, Uno adopts the paradigms of neoclassical theories to present an apology rather than a critique of capitalism.
Author: Alexander Vovin
“The echo of the stone/ where I carved the [Buddha’s] honorable footprints/ reaches the Heaven, […]”.
This book presents the transcription, translation, and analysis of Chinese (753 AD) and Japanese inscriptions (end of the 8th century AD) found on two stones now in the possession of the Yakushiji temple in Nara. All these inscriptions praise the footprints of Buddha, and more exactly their carvings in the stone. The language of the Japanese inscription, which consists of twenty-one poems, reflects the contemporary dialect of Nara. Its writing system shows a quite unique trait, being practically monophonic. The book is richly illustrated by photos of the temple and of the inscriptions.
Author: Reiko YAMATO
East Asian societies have a patri-lineal tradition in which a family successor must be a son and parents live with the heir and his family. In Japan, the patri-lineal family system was prevalent among the samurai warrior class in the early modern period. In the modern period, it was stipulated in the civil code until the end of World War II. This tradition, however, is changing with a background of gender equalization and fewer number of sons resulting from low birth rates. Intergenerational Relationships between Married Children and Their Parents in 21st Century Japan is the first book that introduces a new perspective of the individualized marriage into a study of intergenerational relationships and examines how the patri-lineal tradition is both changing and maintained. This book deals with patri-local coresidence, matri-local nearby-residence, and support exchange between adult children and their parents/ parents-in-law, and offer a new framework for comparative studies of today’s East Asian families.
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia