Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 472 items for :

  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
A Textual Reconstruction of Chapters 1–7
The first half of the book of Daniel contains world-famous stories like the Writing on the Wall. These stories have mostly been transmitted in Aramaic, not Hebrew, as has the influential apocalypse of Daniel 7. This Aramaic corpus shows clear signs of multiple authorship. Which different textual layers can we tease apart, and what do they tell us about the changing function of the Danielic material during the Second Temple Period? This monograph compares the Masoretic Text of Daniel to ancient manuscripts and translations preserving textual variants. By highlighting tensions in the reconstructed archetype underlying all these texts, it then probes the tales’ prehistory even further, showing how Daniel underwent many transformations to yield the book we know today.
Volume Editors: Gillian B. Elliott and Anne Heath
Premodern architecture and built environments were fluid spaces whose configurations and meanings were constantly adapting and changing. The production of transitory meaning transpired whenever a body or object moved through these dynamic spaces. Whether spanning the short duration of a procession or the centuries of a building’s longue durée, a body or object in motion created in-the-moment narratives that unfolded through time and space. The authors in this volume forge new approaches to architectural studies by focusing on the interaction between monuments, artworks, and their viewers at different points in space and time.

Contributors are Christopher A. Born, Elizabeth Carson Pastan, Nicole Corrigan, Gillian B. Elliott, Barbara Franzé, Anne Heath, Philip Jacks, Divya Kumar-Dumas, Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz, Ashley J. Laverock, Susan Leibacher Ward, Elodie Leschot, Meghan Mattsson McGinnis, Michael Sizer, Kelly Thor, and Laura J. Whatley.
Published in Open Access with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation

Historical criticism of the Bible emerged in the context of protestant theology and is confronted in every aspect of its study with otherness: the Jewish people and their writings. However, despite some important exceptions, there has been little sustained reflection on the ways in which scholarship has engaged, and continues to engage, its most significant Other. This volume offers reflections on anti-Semitism, philo-Semitism and anti-Judaism in biblical scholarship from the 19th century to the present. The essays in this volume reflect on the past and prepare a pathway for future scholarship that is mindful of its susceptibility to violence and hatred.
This series was taken over from Deo Publishing in September 2018
The volumes in this series assist research-level students and scholars in providing surveys of recent research on particular fields, with annotated bibliographies and suggestions for the direction of further research. Ideal for anyone about to research or write on a particular biblical book or topic.
This series was taken over from Deo Publishing in September 2018
The volumes in this series provide assistance to scholars and students in Biblical Studies. Typical titles are introductions to the New and Old Testaments, reading the Bible as literature, anthologies, bibliographies and works on method.
By applying a stylistic analysis within a systemic-functional linguistic framework, this study argues that Luke's construal of the Jerusalem Council in Acts 15 and its co-thematic passages attempt to persuade Jewish believers of Luke's audience not to separate from multi-ethnic churches, a goal that is accomplished through subverting the value orientations of a prominent Noahic tradition within Second Temple Jewish literature that promotes strict Jewish isolation from Gentiles. As a result, this study breaks fresh methodological ground in the linguistic study on the New Testament and also advances critical scholarship on the book of Acts.
Volume Editors: Athanasios Despotis and Hermut Löhr
The interest in interdisciplinary research on the experience of religious conversion or spiritual transformation grows progressively. In light of this burgeoning area of study, this volume explores conversion or converting experience in the ancient Mediterranean with attention to early Judaism, early Christianity, and philosophy in the Roman empire. The contributions include both historical and philological reconstructions relying on source material and utilizing interdisciplinary approaches. Similarly, the authors analyze the literary use of the motif of conversion, the topic of philosophical conversion as well as ritual, social and embodied aspects of spiritual transformation.
Author: Andrei Timotin
Author: Chiaen Liu
This book examines the nature of the early church from a Petrine perspective, employing an analysis of register to implement a more synthetic study of relevant texts in the New Testament. Liu utilises a type of discourse analysis that provides a framework for classifying grammatical and lexical information so that the reader can better understand the social function of not only Peter’s speeches in Acts, but also the two epistles attributed to him. Liu’s original and detailed study looks at the content and structure of the texts to enhance our understanding of the early church, with particular attention paid to the dichotomy between Petrine and Pauline Christianity and their competing pictures of Christian origins. This book will interest all scholars and students who wish to extend their understanding of both the historical and literary Peter.