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with Annotated Transcription of Geniza Fragments
Author: Paul Moore
Targum Canticles, composed in the dialectally eclectic idiom of Late Jewish Literary Aramaic (LJLA), had immense historic popularity among Jewish communities worldwide. In this work, Paul R. Moore thoroughly analyses several of the Targum’s grammatical peculiarities, overlooked by previous studies. Through this prism, he considers its literary influences, composition, and LJLA as a precursor of the highly eccentric Aramaic of the 13th century Spanish cabalistic masterpiece, The Zohar. The study includes transcriptions and analysis of the previously unpublished of fragments of the Targum from the Cairo Geniza, and what is possibly its earliest, known translation into Judaeo-Arabic.
Author: Jean Maurais
Much can be learned about a translation’s linguistic and cultural context by studying it as a text, a literary artifact of the culture that produced it. However, its nature as a translation warrants a careful approach, one that pays attention to the process by which its various features came about. In Characterizing Old Greek Deuteronomy as an Ancient Translation, Jean Maurais develops a framework derived from Descriptive Translation Studies to bring both these aspects in conversation. He then outlines how the Deuteronomy translator went about his task and provides a characterization of the work as a literary product.
Volume Editors: Johannes Heil and Sumi Shimahara
This book offers a new and inclusive approach to Western exegesis up to 1100. For too long, modern scholars have examined Jewish and Christian exegesis apart from each other. This is not surprising, given how religious, social, and linguistic borders separated Jews and Christians. But they worked to a great extent on the same texts. Christians were keenly aware that they relied on translation. The contributions to this volume reveal how both sides worked on parallel tracks, posing similar questions and employing more or less the same techniques, and in some rare instances, interdependently.
Volume Editor: Christine Hayes
This volume presents the major works of classical rabbinic Judaism as inter-related aggregates analyzed through three central themes. Part 1, “Intertextuality,” investigates the multi-directional relationships among and between rabbinic texts and nonrabbinic Jewish sources. Part 2, “East and West” explores the impact on rabbinic texts of the cultures of the Hellenistic, Roman, and Christian West and the Sasanian East. Part 3, “Halakha and Aggada,” interrogates the relationship of law and narrative in rabbinic sources. This bold volume uncovers alliances and ruptures -- textual, cultural, and generic -- obscured by document-based approaches to rabbinic literature.
This volume presents the main lectures of the 23rd Congress of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) held in Aberdeen, United Kingdom, in August 2019. Twenty internationally distinguished scholars present their current research on the Hebrew Bible, including the literary history of the Hebrew text, its Greek translation, and the history of interpretation. Some focus on the semantic and syntactic features of the biblical text and its impact on cultural memory while others deal with textual witnesses in the Dead Sea scrolls, Ethiopic sources, and Arabic translations. The volume gives readers a representative view of recent research on the Hebrew Bible.
Author: P. van der Lugt
In this volume, Pieter van der Lugt offers a comprehensive analysis of the rhetorical structure of Isaiah. As in his previous studies on the Book of Job and the Psalter the author demonstrates that classical Hebrew poetry displays a well-defined structure consisting of balanced main parts (cantos) and subdivision into strophes. This rhetorical starting point is of crucial importance for the delimitation of the individual poems in Isaiah 40-48 and in many cases determines their interpretation. Subsequently, it is demonstrated that the successive compositions form well-defined and coherent cycles of poems.
Editor: Hans Ausloos
Almost 75 years ago, the first volume of Oudtestamentische studiën/Old Testament Studies (OTS) was published by Brill (Leiden). Originally, this series published on behalf of the Society for Old Testament Studies in the Netherlands. From 2009 on, OTS publishes on behalf of the Societies for Old Testament Studies in the Netherlands and Belgium (OTW), South Africa (OTSSA), the United Kingdom and Ireland (SOTS).
The series presents high quality volumes – both monographs and edited volumes – on linguistic, textual, historical and theological topics pertaining to the Old Testament.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The Journal for the Study of Judaism Supplement Series provides a forum for the publication of scholarly works on all aspects of Judaism from the Persian period through Late Antiquity. The scope of the Supplement Series corresponds to the scope of the journal. Volumes may be devoted to literary, socio-historical, religio-historical or theological themes, and may be written from any methodological perspective. Volumes of essays are welcome, provided that they have a coherent theme. Volumes dealing with the influence of Judaism on early Christianity also fall within the scope of the series.

The series uses the SBL Handbook of Style Second Edition as its formatting and style standard.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Editor-in-Chief: Christl M. Maier
The Supplements to Vetus Testamentum series covers the whole range of Old Testament study, including Septuaginta studies, Ugaritic research relevant to the study of the Old Testament, Hebrew studies, studies in ancient Israelite history and society, and studies in the history of the discipline. There are both monographs and collective volumes, the latter including the Proceedings of the Triennial International Congresses of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament.

The series published an average of 4,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Published in Open Access with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation

Historical criticism of the Bible emerged in the context of protestant theology and is confronted in every aspect of its study with otherness: the Jewish people and their writings. However, despite some important exceptions, there has been little sustained reflection on the ways in which scholarship has engaged, and continues to engage, its most significant Other. This volume offers reflections on anti-Semitism, philo-Semitism and anti-Judaism in biblical scholarship from the 19th century to the present. The essays in this volume reflect on the past and prepare a pathway for future scholarship that is mindful of its susceptibility to violence and hatred.