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Italian Translations of Hebrew Literature in the Early Modern Period
This volume presents the culmination of research on an almost ignored literary corpus: the translations into literary Italian of classical Hebrew texts made by Jews between 1550 and 1650. It includes dozens of poetical and philosophical texts and wisdom literature as well as dictionaries and biblical translations produced in what their authors viewed as a national tongue, common to Christians and Jews. In so doing, the authors/translators explicitly left behind the so-called Judeo-Italian. These texts, many of them being published for the first time, are studied in the context of intellectual and literary history. The book is an original contribution showing that the linguistic acculturation of German Jews in the late 18th century occurred in Italy 150 years earlier.
Volume Editors: Johannes Heil and Sumi Shimahara
This book offers a new and inclusive approach to Western exegesis up to 1100. For too long, modern scholars have examined Jewish and Christian exegesis apart from each other. This is not surprising, given how religious, social, and linguistic borders separated Jews and Christians. But they worked to a great extent on the same texts. Christians were keenly aware that they relied on translation. The contributions to this volume reveal how both sides worked on parallel tracks, posing similar questions and employing more or less the same techniques, and in some rare instances, interdependently.
Editor / Translator: Julia Schwartzmann
Writing in the late 19th century, Mózes Salamon, rabbi of a small Hungarian community, hoped to convince his fellow rabbis to recognize women as equally privileged members of the People Israel. The result was his The Path of Moses: A Scholarly Essay on the Case of Women in Religious Faith, a ground-breaking enquiry into the causes of women’s exclusion from most of Judaism’s religious practices. Predating contemporary feminism, it gave early expression to ideas found in today’s religious feminist critique of women’s role in Judaism, thus undermining attempts to dismiss those ideas as shallowly mimicking fashionable secular opinion. The Path of Moses is here published for the first time in English, accompanied by the Hebrew original, an introduction, and commentary.
Author: Mahmoud Kayyal
Can translations fuel intractable conflicts or contribute to calming them? To what extent do translators belonging to conflicting cultures find themselves committed to their ethnic identity and its narratives? How do translators on the seam line between the two cultures behave? Does colonial supremacy encourage translators to strengthen cultural and linguistic hegemony or rather undermine it? Mahmoud Kayyal tries to answer these questions and others in this book by examining mutual translations in the shadow of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the hegemony relations between Israel and the Palestinians.
Author: Rachel Sharaby
This book deals with how, starting in the 1960s, immigrant groups in Israel constructed their ethnic identity by reviving their ethnic festivals and turning them into part of Israeli society. For the immigrants, these festivals serve as a collective “definitional ceremony,” with an intersection of ethnicity, culture, and identity. They also help them to develop cultural and religious syncretism. The discussion of their social and political leaders’ ethnic activism provides important insights about the ways in which immigrant leaders employ their ethnic tradition as a resource for mobilizing cultural, social, and political capital that will facilitate their penetration of the cultural mainstream.
The Early Modern Synagogue Painter and His World
Author: Zvi Orgad
The book Eliezer-Zusman of Brody: The Early Modern Synagogue Painter and His World discusses the Jewish cultural and artistic migration from Eastern Europe to German lands in the first half of the eighteenth century. Its case study is the synagogue painter Eliezer-Zusman of Brody, who painted several synagogues in the Franconia area, today in southern Germany. By choosing this case study, the book highlights hitherto neglected aspects of the life and work methods of religious artisans in Eastern and Central Europe in the early modern period. The focus on synagogue paintings in Franconia presents an unexpected intensive scene of synagogue painters in the periphery of Jewish Ashkenazi existence.