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Exploring Ritual Creativity in the Footsteps of Anne-Christine Hornborg
This book brings together leading international scholars with the aim of exploring ritual perspectives in the study of contemporary religions. It combines significant theoretical and methodological reflections and applies it to four main fields relevant to the study of contemporary religions: indigeneity; new spiritualities and ecology; lived religion (with Islam and Africa as case studies); and finally, religion and embodiment.
The structure and content of the book takes its point of departure from the research topics and collegial network of the internationally acclaimed scholar of ritual studies, Professor Anne-Christine Hornborg. The book is dedicated to her.
Traces of a Forgotten Ritual in Ancient Myths and Legends
Author:
The first book that deals with the territorial cults of early Japan by focusing on how such cults were founded in ownerless regions. Numerous ancient Japanese myths and legends are discussed to show that the typical founding ritual was a two-phase ritual that turned the territory into a horizontal microcosm, complete with its own ‘terrestrial heaven’ inhabited by local deities.
Reversing Mircea Eliade’s popular thesis, the author concludes that the concept of the human-made horizontal microcosm is not a reflection but the source of the religious concept of the macrocosm with gods dwelling high up in the sky.
The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.
Volume Editors: and
Supplements to Method & Theory in the Study of Religion publishes book length manuscripts which explicitly address the problems of methodology and theory in the academic study of religion. This includes such traditional multidisciplinary points of departure as history, philosophy, anthropology, psychology, and sociology, but also the natural sciences, and such other approaches as feminist theory, discourse analysis, and ideology critique. Supplements to Method & Theory in the Study of Religion also concentrates on the critical analysis of the history of the study of religion itself.

The series has published an average of 1,5 volumes per year since 2013.
Volume Editor:
The Hand of Fatima traces the development and symbolism ascribed to the hand motif in the Arab and Islamic world, and beyond. Richly illustrated, it details the many types of khamsas produced historically and today – such as khamsas with swords, and khamsas with eagles – and the many objects on which khamsas appear, such as on amulets and flags. It traces the journey of the khamsa into the contemporary world of social and fine art, including museum highlights. Special sections are dedicated to the khamsa in Algeria; cultural crossover in Spain, Portugal, and Brazil; and the symbol of the hand in Shiʿism.
Volume Editors: and
Aries Book Series: Texts and Studies in Western Esotericism is the first professional academic book series specifically devoted to a long-neglected but now rapidly developing domain of research in the humanities, usually referred to as “Western Esotericism”. This field covers a variety of “alternative” currents in western religious history, including so-called “hermetic philosophy” and related currents in the early modern period; alchemy, paracelsianism and rosicrucianism; Jewish and Christian kabbalah and its later developments; theosophical and illuminist currents; and various occultist and related developments during the 19th and 20th centuries, up to and including popular contemporary currents such as the New Age movement.

Published under the auspices of the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism (ESSWE).

For the journal Aries - Journal for the Study of Western Esotericism please click here.

The series has published an average of two volumes per year over the last five years.
Karl Rahner and the Contemporary Exploration for Meaning
In Theology, Empowerment, and Prison Ministry Meins G.S. Coetsier offers a new scholarly account of Karl Rahner’s theological anthropology and the prison pastorate with a contemporary expansion for meaning, seeking an antidote to the suffering and isolation of those incarcerated with a “theology of empowerment.” Drawing on prison ministry theorists and practitioners, and on the experiences of Viktor Frankl, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Etty Hillesum, the book argues that Rahner’s views on prison ministry are significant and encouraging but limited regarding the needs and demands of 21st-century prison ministry. In a convincing, perceptive, and groundbreaking study, Coetsier goes beyond Rahner with ecumenical and interreligious perspectives, reminding us all of our human dignity, of meaning and transformation, of our liberation, creativity, hope and community.
This book forms an introduction to the emerging discipline of “psychology of migration”, which is an interdisciplinary field of reflection and research, joining together diverse subfields of psychology with anthropological, sociological, demographic and historical inquiry on migration processes. The introductory chapter marks the borders of this borderline discipline, defines important notions and the subject of inquiry, and presents its main research themes together with prospective paths for the discipline’s development. The second chapter presents research methods applied in psychology of migration. Acculturation processes and their psychological analysis as well an impact on the mental health of migrants are the main topics of interest in the third chapter. The last chapter covers issues of mutual relations between religion and migration. Conclusive remarks on contemporary psychology of migration facing cultural and religious diversity in COVID-19 pandemic times are outlined, pointing at challenges the discipline will surely meet in the future.
Editors-in-Chief: and
This series of monographs provides a platform for the burgeoning scholarship on religion and politics from either religious studies, political science, or the social sciences in general. Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Politics seeks to examine topics that are intensely debated in the public space such as violence and politics, human rights, or democracy and secularism from multidisciplinary theoretical and data-driven perspectives.

The series welcomes manuscripts based on recent original research (whether involving fieldwork, archival work, surveys, or other methods) in a particular national or regional setting or in a comparative way across religions or political contexts. Manuscripts typically range from 35,000 to 40,000 words, but could also extend to 80,000 words. The book series does not publish edited volumes.

Until 2020, Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Politics was also published as a journal.