Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 452 items for :

  • Ancient Philosophy x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Volume Editors: Jana Schultz and James Wilberding
Sosipatra, Hypatia, Macrina: some of the most famous female philosophers of antiquity were connected to Neoplatonism. But what does it mean to be a woman philosopher in late antiquity? How is the inclusive nature of the Neoplatonic schools connected to their ethical, political, and metaphysical ideas? What role does the religious dimension of late Neoplatonism and the role of women as priestesses play in understanding Neoplatonic women philosophers?
This book offers thirteen essays that examine women and the female in Neoplatonism from a variety of perspectives, paying particular attention to the interactions between the metaphysics, psychology, and ethics.
Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia
The act of recording anything is at the same time an act of silencing. Choices are made at every step about what to keep and what to discard. Examining what Plutarch has left out enriches our understanding of what he has chosen to say, and both deepens our knowledge of the literary practices of this influential writer and opens new and fruitful lines of enquiry about Plutarch, his work, and his world.
Platons Antwort an Protagoras im ‘Theaitetos’ und im ‘Protagoras’
Protagoras beansprucht, die Jugend erziehen zu können. Warum nicht? Wenn «Mensch Maß aller Dinge» ist, kann jeder jeden ‘besser’ machen… Für Plato geht das nicht auf. Insofern Pädagogik Menschen dazu bringen will, ‘bessere’ Wesen zu werden, verlangt sie nach Plato ein gesundes Verständnis von ‘Sein’ überhaupt. Diese Studie untersucht die ontologischen Implikationen des Homo mensura-Satzes, Protagoras’ Prämisse, im ‘Theaitetos’ – einem Dialog, der selten ontologisch gelesen wird. Wenn der protagoräische Prämisse den pädagogischen Anspruch nicht trägt, dürfte der ‘Protagoras’ gar nicht eigentlich von den erzieherischen Fragen handeln, die diskutiert werden. Es könnte sich herausstellen, dass er einen ‘verborgenen’ Diskurs enthält…

Protagoras claims to be able to educate the young. If «Man is Measure of Everything», anybody can make everybody ‘better’… To Plato, this doesn't add up. Insofar as pedagogy aims at making humans become better beings, to Plato it supposes a sound conception of ‘being’ per se. This study explores the ontological implications of homo mensura, Protagoras’ premiss, in the ‘Theaetetus’ – a dialogue which is rarely read ontologically. If the Protagorean premiss doesn't support the pedagogical claim, the ‘Protagoras’ might not even be about the educational questions under discussion, but turn out to contain a ‘hidden’ discourse…
Brill’s Plato Studies Series aims to gather together the most recent and relevant contributions, in order to identify debates and trends within the study of Plato and to provide a holistic understanding of the wide range of issues related to Plato’s philosophy. Of special significance for the series will be the examination of Plato’s literary style and its relationship to his theoretical project as, perhaps, one of the central problems in the study of Plato and Ancient Philosophy as a whole. Even after two thousand years there is still no consensus about why Plato expresses his ideas in such a unique style and the series will aim to address this question. In addition, the Series will warmly welcome contributions focusing on internal and recurrent issues like the relation between myth and philosophy, language, epistemology and ontology in Plato’s work. Special attention will also be given to new interpretative challenges and recent hermeneutical trends, which have emerged from the globalization of current Platonic studies. These new approaches to Plato are likely to change the future frame of Platonic scholarship, providing instruments and renewed impulses for the generations of philosophers to come.
Volume Editor: Diego Zucca
What is knowledge? This fundamental question is treated with unprecedented depth by Plato in his Theaetetus, where it opens the path to many puzzles and issues we are still coping with in our days: what is the nature of perception, belief, justification, truth? Which objects can be properly known? How are we to account for cognitive mistakes? How can the mind be "in touch" with the world? This book provides fresh, rigorous and original explorations of the main themes of the dialogue by well-established scholars who work on Plato and Platonism, especially on Plato's theory of knowledge.
Author: Emmanuel Bermon
Écrite entre 386 et 390 dans l’effervescence de la découverte du néoplatonisme, la correspondance entre Augustin et son ami Nebridius est un concentré de questions platoniciennes sur l’infini, la distinction entre le sensible et l’intelligible, l’imagination et la réminiscence, les rêves inspirés, l’assimilation à Dieu, le « véhicule » de l’âme, l’intériorité et l’individualité. S’y ajoutent des développements théologiques majeurs sur l’Incarnation et la Trinité. Grâce à ces lettres qui font tour à tour « entendre le Christ, Platon et Plotin », comme le dit Nebridius lui-même, nous comprenons mieux ce moment incandescent de la vie d’Augustin où il se convertit à la fois à la philosophie et au christianisme, comme en témoigneront plus tard les Confessions.

Written between 386 and 390 during the excitement of his discovery of Neoplatonism, Augustine’s correspondence with his friend Nebridius is a distillation of Platonic questions concerning the infinite, the distinction between sensible and intelligible phenomena, the imagination and recollection, inspired dreams, assimilation to God, the “vehicle” of the soul, interiority, and individuality. In addition, the exchange contains major theological insights concerning the Incarnation and the Trinity. Thanks to these letters, which, as Nebridius himself says, make “Christ, Plato, and Plotinus heard,” we can better understand this incandescent moment in Augustine’s life when he converted to both philosophy and Christianity, as the Confessions will later testify.
Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

Volume Editor: Juhana Toivanen
The trilogy Forms of Representation in the Aristotelian Tradition investigates how Aristotle and his ancient and medieval successors understood the relation between the external world and the human mind. It gives an equal footing to the three most influential linguistic traditions – Greek, Latin, and Arabic – and offers insightful interpretations of historical theories of perception, dreaming, and thinking. This first volume focuses on sense perception and discusses philosophical questions concerning the external senses, their classification, and their functioning, from Aristotle to Brentano.