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Private Munificence Towards Cities and Associations in the First Three Centuries AD
Author: Shanshan Wen
Communal Dining in in the Roman West explores why the practice of privately sponsored communal dining gained popularity in certain parts of the Western Roman Empire for almost 300 years. This book brings together 350 Latin inscriptions to examine the benefactors and beneficiaries, the geographical and chronological distributions, and the relationship between public and collegial dining practices. It argues that food-related euergetism was a region-specific phenomenon which was rooted in specific social and political cultures in the communities of Italy, Baetica and Africa Proconsularis. The region-specific differences in political cultures and long-term changes in these cultures are key to understanding not only the long persistence of this practice but also its ultimate disappearance.
Author: E. Hijmans
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.

This is part I of a two-part set.
EUHORMOS is an international book series intended for monographs and collective volumes on classical antiquity. Specifically, it welcomes manuscripts related to the concept of ‘anchoring innovation’ by classical scholars of all disciplines from all over the world. All books will be published in Open Access (online) as well as in print.
The series publishes book-length studies (single-authored or edited) of ancient innovations and their societal perceptions and valuations, in particular in connection with their ‘anchoring’, the various ways in which ‘the new’ could (or could not) be connected to what was already familiar. ‘The new’ is not restricted to the technical or scientific domains, but can include the ‘new information’ imparted by speakers through linguistic means, literary innovation, political, social, cultural or economic innovation, and new developments in material culture.

EUHORMOS is one of the results of the Dutch so-called Gravitation Grant (2017), awarded to a consortium of scholars from OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies. See https://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation.

EUHORMOS is the Homeric term for a harbour ‘in which the anchoring is good’. Under this auspicious title, we aim to publish a book series striving to afford ‘good anchorage’ to studies contributing to a better understanding of ‘anchoring innovation’ in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

For sending your proposal or submitting manuscripts for the series, please contact Brill’s Associate Editor for Classical Studies, Giulia Moriconi.
Editor-in-Chief: Jonathan Hall
Mnemosyne Supplements, History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity is a series of monographs and edited volumes devoted to studies in Ancient History and the archaeology of the Classical period.

History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity is published as a sub-series of the Mnemosyne Supplements bookseries.
This book changes our understanding of the Roman conceptions about the sea by placing the focus on shipwrecks as events that act as bridges between the sea and the land. The study explores the different Roman legal definitions of these spaces, and how individuals of divergent legal statuses interacted within these areas. Its main purpose is to chart and analyse the Roman conception of the maritime landscape from the Late Republican until the Severan period. This book integrates maritime history and ethnography with the physical remains of past maritime systems, such as shipwrecks, ports, villages, fortifications, and documented legal rulings.
Series of Publications on the Archaeology and Ancient History of the Black Sea Area
This series aims to publish some of the huge wealth of archaeological material that is being discovered and studied around the shores of the Black Sea. Volumes will range from monographs on excavations and studies of objects to collections of papers and conference reports. The series is edited by Gocha Tsetskhladze with the assistance of advisory editors.This series is no longer published by Brill
Author: Andreas Heil
This monograph examines the literary representation of encounters between the living and the dead in Homer and the Roman epic poets of the early imperial period. The focus is on one particular situation: a witness to the afterlife (e.g. Odysseus or the Sibyl) who narrates encounters with the dead that he or she cannot (it would appear) actually have seen. This insufficiently studied and intriguing motif, namely seemingly impossible eye-witness testimony, can already be traced in Homer and then with variations in Vergil, the Culex poet, Lucan, Silius Italicus, and Statius.

Die vorliegende Monographie untersucht die literarische Gestaltung von Begegnungen zwischen Lebenden und Toten bei Homer und den römischen Epikern der frühen Kaiserzeit. Im Mittelpunkt steht dabei eine besondere Situation: Ein Jenseitszeuge (z.B. Odysseus oder die Sibylle) berichtet von Begegnungen mit Toten, die er oder sie (scheinbar) nicht gesehen haben kann. Dieses unzureichend erforschte und faszinierende Motiv, nämlich die scheinbar unmögliche Autopsie, lässt sich bereits bei Homer und dann in Variationen bei Vergil, dem Culex-Dichter, Lucan, Silius Italicus und Statius nachweisen.
Ehrenstatuen in öffentlichen Räumen Siziliens vom Hellenismus bis in die Spätantike
Honores inauditi bietet erstmals eine systematische Untersuchung der Ehrenstatuen Siziliens. Vor dem Hintergrund der wechselvollen Geschichte der Insel werden die Ehrenstatuen von den ersten archäologischen Zeugnissen für Könige in der Mitte des 3. Jhs. v. Chr. über die Kaiserzeit bis zum Ende der Praxis in der Spätantike in den Blick genommen. Das archäologische und epigraphische Material weist auf eine deutliche Kontinuität hin, zeigt aber auch Veränderungen der Monumente, der Beteiligten, bei der Sprache der Inschriften und bei ihrer räumlichen Anordnung. Dieser Wandel wird in einen Kontext mit übergreifenden Entwicklungen, aber auch mit lokalen Faktoren wie Stadtgeschichte und überregionalen Handelsrouten gestellt.

Honores inauditi offers the first comprehensive study of honorary statues and their spatial and social context in Sicily. Based on a catalogue of mostly unpublished material, the book traces honorary statues throughout their historical development, starting from the first archaeologically known honorary statues erected for kings in the mid-3rd c. BC until the practice’s decline in Late antiquity. Although continuously used, various changes are detected throughout time: the monuments’ material and size, their display, the language of the inscriptions and the actors involved. These changes are contextualized by overarching developments such as trade routes, as well as local urban factors.
This volume, examining the reception of ancient rhetoric, aims to demonstrate that the past is always part of the present: in the ways in which decisions about crucial political, social and economic matters have been made historically; or in organic interaction with literature, philosophy and culture at the core of the foundation principles of Western thought and values. Analysis is meant to cover the broadest possible spectrum of considerations that focus on the totality of rhetorical species (i.e. forensic, deliberative and epideictic) as they are applied to diversified topics (including, but not limited to, language, science, religion, literature, theatre and other cultural processes (e.g. athletics), politics and leadership, pedagogy and gender studies) and cross-cultural, geographical and temporal contexts.