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Editor: Laura Nicolì
Gathering together generations of scholars, The Great Protector of Wits provides a new assessment of baron d’Holbach (1723-1789) and his circle. A challenging figure of the European Enlightenment, Paul-Henri Thiry d’Holbach not only was a radically materialistic philosopher, a champion of anticlericalism, the author of the Système de la nature known as “the Bible of atheists”, an idéologue, a popularizer of the natural sciences and a prolific contributor to the Encyclopédie, but also played a crucial role as an organizer of intellectual networks, a master of disseminating clandestine literature and a consummate strategist in authorial fictions. In this collective volume, for the first time, all these different threads of d’Holbach’s “philosophy in action” are considered and analyzed in their interconnection.

Contributors include: Jacopo Agnesina, Nicholas Cronk, Mélanie Éphrème, Enrico Galvagni, Jonathan Israel, Alan Charles Kors, Mladen Kozul, Brunello Lotti, Emilio Mazza, Gianluca Mori, Iryna Mykhailova, Gianni Paganini, Paolo Quintili, Alain Sandrier, Ruggero Sciuto, Maria Susana Seguin, and Gerhardt Stenger
In John Duns Scotus on Grace and the Trinitarian Missions, Mitchell J. Kennard argues that Franciscan theologian John Duns Scotus (d. 1308) has been wrongly inscribed in the narrative of the late medieval theology of grace. Scotus is presented here not as the initiation or cause of the low fourteenth-century theology of grace but as the last great contributor to the high thirteenth-century theology of grace as deifying participation in the divine nature. This book argues that Scotus’s signature reflections on the relationship between grace and the Trinitarian missions—the Incarnation of the Son and the indwelling of the Holy Spirit—warrant closer attention by both historical and systematic theologians alike.
Studien zur ideologischen Ambivalenz der ›deutschen‹ Mystik
Volume Editors: Maxime Mauriège and Martina Roesner
Wohl kein mittelalterlicher Autor hat im Laufe der Jahrhunderte eine größere Faszination auf seine Leser ausgeübt als Meister Eckhart. Die besondere Universalität und Weite seines mystisch-theologischen Denkens hat ihn jedoch auch immer wieder zur Projektionsfläche für ideologisch motivierte Interpretationen aller Art gemacht. Der vorliegende Band beleuchtet die Rezeption, die Eckharts Mystik in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus erfahren hat. Im Mittelpunkt stehen dabei die verschiedenen und teilweise widersprüchlichen Versuche, Eckhart zum Begründer eines „germanischen Christentums“ bzw. eines „deutschen Glaubens“ zu stilisieren und ihn in polemischer Weise gegen das Judentum, aber auch gegen die Katholische Kirche in Stellung zu bringen.

Meister Eckhart is undoubtedly one of the most fascinating medieval authors, who has appealed to a wide audience across the centuries. At the same time, the extraordinary universality and openness of his mystical-theological approach has repeatedly made him the object of all kinds of ideological projections and misinterpretations. The present volume examines the reception of Eckhart’s mysticism in the era of National Socialism. The main focus is put on the different and sometimes contradictory attempts to present Eckhart as the founder of “Germanic Christianity” or “German faith” and as a visceral opponent of both Judaism and the Catholic Church.