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The Pirate's Way
Author: Arne Zuidhoek
The romantic picture of pirates as colourful individuals terrorizing the “seven seas” has long eclipsed historical fact. The Pirate Encyclopedia contains the most complete body of data available on the rovers’ rightful legitimacy as subjects of investigation. For the first time we see so many pirates (c. 7.000) brought together. This pirate’s who’s who, including the women pirates, makes it possible to see different areas and their significance and circumstances, and so the essential companion for scholars, students and a general audience intrigued by tales and facts.
Saying that horses shaped the medieval world – and the way we see it today – is hardly an exaggeration. Why else do we imagine a medieval knight – or a nomadic warrior – on horseback? Why do we use such metaphors as “unbridled” or “bearing a yoke” in our daily language? Studies of medieval horses and horsemanship are increasingly popular, but they often focus on a single aspect of equestrianism or a single culture. In this book, you will find information about both elite and humble working equines, about the ideology and practicalities of medieval horsemanship across different countries, from Iceland to China.
Contributors are Gloria Allaire, Luise Borek, Gail Brownrigg, Agnès Carayon, Gavina Cherchi, John C. Ford, Loïs Forster, Jürg Gassmann, Rebecca Henderson, Anna-Lena Lange, Romain Lefebvre, Rena Maguire, Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, and Alexia-Foteini Stamouli.
For about a decade, Amalric, the crusader king of Jerusalem, Nur al-Din, the Turkic ruler of Damascus and Aleppo, and Shawar, the vizier of Fatimid Egypt, would vie for control over one of the wealthiest regions around the Mediterranean. In the end, it was Saladin, the nephew of one of Nur al-Din’s commanders, who would emerge as the last man standing. Contest for Egypt is the first modern study devoted exclusively to this tripartite struggle for influence. Readers are introduced to the background and aftermath, while focus is placed on examining the central actions, motives and ambitions that shaped events between 1164 and 1174.
The Conditions of Confinement in Modern Asian History
Why have Asian states – colonial and independent – imprisoned people on a massive scale in detention camps? How have detainees experienced the long months and years of captivity? And what does the creation of camps and the segregation of people in them mean for society as a whole? This ambitious book surveys the systems of detention camps set up in Asia from the beginning of the 20th century in The Philippines, Indonesia, Japan, Malaya, Myanmar (Burma), Vietnam, Timor, Korea and China.
Author: Brian Smith
The history of noncombatant immunity is well established. What is less understood is how militaries have rationalized violating this immunity. This book traces the development of how militaries have rationalized the killing of the innocent from the thirteenth century onward. In the process, this historiography shows how we have arrived at the ascendant convention that assumes militaries should not intentionally kill the innocent. Furthermore, it shows how moral arguments about the permissibility of killing the innocent are largely adaptations to material changes in how wars are fought, whether through technological innovations or changes in institutional structures.
Author: Allen J. Frank
Kazakh Muslims in the Red Army is the first study of the WWII experience of Soviet Kazakhs. Based on indigenous-language sources, it focuses on the wartime experiences of Kazakh conscripts and the home front as expressed in correspondence. The study emphasizes how Kazakh social structure, religion, and patriotism were expressed and mobilized during the war years.
By focusing on indigenous forms of private correspondence, the book presents an alternative to previous studies focusing on narratives and documentation derived from the Soviet state. It offers an entirely new basis for examining the wartime experiences of Soviet citizens and Soviet Muslims.
The Pedagogical Preparation for Collective Mass Violence
This book shows that education does not only prepare war, but defines its character for future generations.
Pointing out the intricate interconnetion with the various practices of education this volume offers in-depth studies of war and education in several chronological and geographical contexts. Tying in with the latest state of the art the authors offer examples for education for war, education in war and education for reconciliation in the aftermath of wars from a global perspective.