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China and the Parthians, Sasanians, and Arabs in the First Millennium
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What type of exchanges occurred between West and East Asia in the first millennium CE? What sort of connections existed between Persia and China? What did the Chinese know of early Islam?
This study offers an overview of the cultural, diplomatic, commercial, and religious relationships that flourished between Iran and China, building on the pioneering work of Berthold Laufer’s Sino-Iranica (1919) while utilizing a diverse array of Classical Chinese sources to tell the story of Sino-Iran in a fresh light to highlight the significance of transcultural networks across Asia in late antiquity.
Series Editors: and
How have the historical experiences and legacies of the communist revolution before 1949 and socialism under Mao influenced the course of reform and development in China since the 1980s? And how do Chinese intellectuals reexamine the aspects and trajectories of socialism and reform in China and reinterpret the links and discontinuities between them? The Rethinking Socialism and Reform in China series presents the most innovative studies in English translation by leading Chinese scholars, which have been originally published by Open Times (Kaifang shidai), one of the most influential journals in China that appeals to both academics and the general public. The planned volumes of the series cover a variety of themes ranging from the communist revolution, social control and mobilization, and everyday power relations in Maoist China, to economic change, governance and resistance, gender, ethnicity, and cultural issues in recent decades.
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This work is a translation of the Xiang'er commentary to the Daodejing and Jao Tsung-i's (1917-2018) supplemental notes and analysis. Jao Tsung-i offers a historically and hermeneutically rich study of the Xiang’er Commentary, discovered in the Mogao caves at Dunhuang in the final years of the Qing Dynasty, and its author Zhang Daoling. Opening a new and fascinating window into the early reception of the Daodejing, Jao Tsung-i also uncovers the important influence texts such as the Scripture of Great Peace (Taiping jing) had on Celestial Masters Daoism and the construction of the Xiang'er commentary.
To Confine the Surging Tide from the Outside World, 1901–1937
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In this book, Ying Zhou argues that educational reform filled a critical role in bridging the precarious gap between democratic ideals and political realities in late Qing and Republican China, where institutional change in education and the cultivation of a qualified citizenry were two sides of the same coin in the development of democratic education.

Through a multi-level analysis of the (re)arrangements of national education and teachings of citizenship, Zhou unravels the complex political and educational nexus in China between 1901–1937, where the hope of education was to bring both political modernity and social progress.
Zuozhuan (Zuo Tradition) is the foundational text of Chinese historiography and the largest text from preimperial China. For two millennia, its immense complexity has given rise to countless controversies, with scholars debating its nature, time of composition, and historical reliability.
In the present volume—the first of its kind in any Western language—leading scholars of ancient China, Greece, and Rome approach Zuozhuan from multi-faceted perspectives to examine in detail Zuozhuan’s sources, narrative patterns, and meta-narrative devices; analyze the text in dialogue with other ancient Chinese works; and open it to the comparative study with ancient Greek and Roman historiography.
Contributors are: Chen Minzhen, Stephen Durrant, Joachim Gentz, Martin Kern, Wai-yee Li, Nino Luraghi, Ellen O’Gorman, Yuri Pines, David Schaberg, and Kai Vogelsang.
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Who was Yang Tinghe? Despite being one of Ming China’s most eminent officials, Yang and his career have long eluded scholarly study in the West.
In this volume, Aaron Throness engages a trove of untapped Ming sources and secondary scholarship to recount Yang Tinghe’s political life, and in unprecedented detail. Throness explores how Yang, a pragmatic politician and conservative Confucian, rose through the bureaucracy and responded to dire threats to the Ming court from within and without. He also traces Yang’s meteoric rise to power, the clashes that occasioned his downfall, and his apotheosis as dynastic savior. Through Yang Tinghe’s successes, struggles, and failures this political biography offers a critical appraisal of both the man and his times.
The Song Dynasty Making of China’s Greatest Poet
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Irreducible to conventional labels usually applied to him, the Tang poet Du Fu (712–770) both defined and was defined by the literary, intellectual, and socio-political cultures of the Song dynasty (960–1279).
Jue Chen not only argues in his work that Du Fu was constructed according to particular literary and intellectual agendas of Song literati but also that conventional labels applied to Du Fu do not accurately represent this construction campaign. He also discusses how Du Fu’s image as the greatest poet sheds unique light on issues that can deepen our understanding of the subtleties in the poetic culture of Song China.
Volume Editor:
The establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 heralded dramatic changes in Chinese cultural practices. This volume, the latest entry in the Historical Studies of Contemporary China series, includes 11 articles translated from Historical Studies of Contemporary China (Dangdai Zhongguo shi yanjiu), one of China’s leading academic journals.

The broad range of cultural forms covered include the book trade and publishing industry, comic strips, literacy and education, popular visual art, Peking Opera, and rural temple fairs. This volume introduces readers to cutting edge Chinese language scholarship and a vibrant cultural scene as it transitioned to the era of the People’s Republic, tracing the continuities as well as the changes in cultural life in China throughout the 20th century.