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This volume provides an overview of the development of the Patriarchate of Constantinople from Late Antiquity to the Early Ottoman period (4th to 15th c.). It highlights continuities and changes in the organizational, dogmatic, and intellectual framework of the central ecclesiastical institution of the Byzantine Empire in the face of political and religious upheavals. The volume pays attention to the relations of the Patriarchate with other churches in the West and in the East. Across the disciplinary divide between Byzantine and Ottoman studies, the volume explains the longevity of the Patriarchate beyond the fall of Byzantium in 1453 up to modern times. A particular focus is laid on an original register book of the 14th century.

Contributors are: Claudia Rapp, Frederick Lauritzen, Tia M. Kolbaba, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Marie-Hélène Blanchet, Dimitrios G. Apostolopoulos, Machi Païzi-Apostolopoulou, Klaus-Peter Todt, Mihailo S. Popović, Konstantinos Vetochnikov, Ekaterini Mitsiou, Vratislav Zervan, and Christian Gastgeber.
Volume Editor: Frédéric Bauden
Culture matérielle et contacts diplomatiques rassemble quatorze études qui traitent de la culture matérielle en relation avec les échanges diplomatiques qui ont marqué un espace géographique couvrant la zone méditerranéenne (Orient islamique, pour l’essentiel, Occident latin et Byzance) et une période qui correspond à celle de l’amplification de ces échanges, c’est-à-dire entre le XIe et le XVIe siècles, et où les sources se font plus nombreuses. Ce volume est divisé en trois parties, chacune correspondant à un des aspects majeurs de la matérialité de la diplomatie prémoderne : les ambassades, les cadeaux, et les documents.

The present volume brings together fourteen studies that deal with material culture in relation to diplomatic exchanges that marked a geographical area covering the Mediterranean area (Islamic East (mostly), Latin West and Byzantium),Cont and a period that corresponds to that of the amplification of these exchanges, that is to say between the eleventh and the sixteenth centuries, and where the sources are more numerous. This volume is divided into three parts, each corresponding to one of the major aspects of the materiality of premodern diplomacy: embassies, gifts, and documents.

Contributors: Isabelle Augé, Frédéric Bauden, Marisa Bueno, Thierry Buquet, Malika Dekkiche, Nicolas Drocourt, Jesse Hysell, Cécile Khalifa, Élisabeth Malamut, Émilie Maraszak, Mohamed Ouerfelli, Stéphane Péquignot, Daniel Potthast, Alessandro Rizzo, Beatrice Saletti, Motia Zouihal.
Editor: Wolfram Brandes
Brill’s Companions to the Byzantine World is a peer reviewed series of research companion volumes providing high-level and up-to-date surveys of current research into all aspects of the Byzantine world from the 4th to the 15th centuries. Volumes deal with cities, regions, monasteries, courts, persons, movements, schools, classical and biblical reception, genres, and more. Written by the foremost specialists in the respective fields, they offer balanced accounts along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. The books are normally multi-author volumes, thoroughly planned out at an editorial level to ensure comprehensiveness and cohesion, maximising their value to the student and scholar.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor, Professor Wolfram Brandes or the Publisher at Brill , Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
In The Pechenegs: Nomads in the Political and Cultural Landscape of Medieval Europe, Aleksander Paroń offers a reflection on the history of the Pechenegs, a nomadic people which came to control the Black Sea steppe by the end of the ninth century. Nomadic peoples have often been presented in European historiography as aggressors and destroyers whose appearance led to only chaotic decline and economic stagnation. Making use of historical and archaeological sources along with abundant comparative material, Aleksander Paroń offers here a multifaceted and cogent image of the nomads’ relations with neighboring political and cultural communities in the tenth and eleventh centuries.
Battlefield Emotions in Late Antiquity is a pioneering work, the first to present a comprehensive analysis of fear and motivation on the battlefields of Late Antiquity. By examining military treatises, Łukasz Różycki identifies means of manipulating the morale of soldiers on the same and on opposing sides, showing various examples of military trickery. The book analyzes non-combat properties of equipment, commanders’ speeches, war cries, keeping up appearances, and other methods of affecting the human psyche. The book is written in the spirit of new military history and combines the methodology of a historian, archaeologist, and philologist, and also considers aspects of psychology, particularly related to the functioning of groups and individuals in extreme situations.
Dedicated to Erica Cruikshank Dodd, Art and Material Culture in the Byzantine and Islamic Worlds offers new perspectives on the Christian and Muslim communities of the east Mediterranean from medieval to contemporary times. The contributors examine how people from diverse religious backgrounds adapted to their changing political landscapes and show that artistic patronage, consumption, and practices are interwoven with constructed narratives. The essays consider material and textual evidence for painted media, architecture, and the creative process in Byzantium, Crusader-era polities, the Ottoman empire, and the modern Middle East, thus demonstrating the importance of the past in understanding the present.

Contributors: Evanthia Baboula, Lesley Jessop, Anthony Cutler, Jaroslav Folda, John Osborne, Glenn Peers, Annemarie Weyl Carr, Mat Immerzeel, Bas Snelders, Angela Andersen, May Farhat, Marcus Milwright, Rico Franses.
Volume Editor: Salvatore Cosentino
This book offers a collection of essays on Byzantine Italy, the area from which we have inherited the richest and best-preserved historical evidence among all of the regions of the former Eastern Roman Empire up to the 11th century. The collection aims to provide readers with a critical overview of current research as well as new insights concerning political, institutional, economic, social, cultural and environmental aspects of the Italian regions under Byzantine rule. The methodological approach of the volume combines history with archaeology and art history, while remaining focused on the general framework of the early medieval Mediterranean. The result is a fresh and up-to-date synthesis that can be useful both for specialists and students.

Contributors are: Lucia Arcifa, Paul Arthur, Isabella Baldini, Massimo Bernabò, Brunella Bruno, Salvatore Cosentino, Nathaniel Cutajar, Francesco D’Aiuto, Paola Degni, Deborah Deliyannis, Vera von Falkenhausen, Sauro Gelichi, Federico Marazzi, Jean-Marie Martin, Alessandra Molinari, Enrico Morini, Annliese Nef, Ghislaine Noye, Annick Peters-Custot, Vivien Prigent, Mario Re, Denis Sami, Pier Giorgio Spanu, and Enrico Zanini.

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Metaphrasis: A Byzantine Concept of Rewriting and Its Hagiographical Products represents a first and authoritative discussion of rewriting in Byzantium. It brings together a rich variety of articles that treat the topic of hagiographical rewriting from various angles.The contributors discuss and comment on different kinds of texts in Greek and other languages, including Apophthegmata Patrum, Passions, Saints’ Lives, Enkomia, Miracle Collections, Synaxaria, and Menologia which date from late antiquity to late Byzantium. The volume offers a series of case studies examining how the same legends evolved through time by the process of rewriting. It is shown that the main driving force behind such rewriting was adaptation to different audiences and contexts. This work argues that rewriting is central to Christian cultures in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Andria Andreou, Anne Alwis, Stavroula Constantinou, Koen de Temmerman, Kristoffel Demoen, Marina Detoraki, Bernard Flusin, Laura Franco, Martin Hinterberger, Christian Høgel, Daria D. Resh, Klazina Staat, Julie van Pelt, Robert Wiśniewski, and † John Wortley.
Volume Editors: Sarah Gador-Whyte and Andrew Mellas
The essays in Hymns, Homilies and Hermeneutics explore the literature of Byzantine liturgical communities and provide a window into lived Christianity in this period. The liturgical performance of Christian hymns and sermons creatively engaged the faithful in biblical exegesis, invited them to experience theology in song, and shaped their identity. These sacred stories, affective scripts and salvific songs were the literature of a liturgical community – hymns and sermons were heard, and in some cases sung, by lay and monastic Christians throughout the life of Byzantium. In the field of Byzantine studies there is a growing appreciation of the importance of liturgical texts for understanding the many facets of Byzantine Christianity: we are in the midst of a liturgical turn. This book is a timely contribution to the emerging scholarship, illuminating the intersection between liturgical hymns, homiletics and hermeneutics.
This volume places the satirical works of the Middle Byzantine period in a wider political and socio-cultural context, exploring not only their various forms but also their functions and meanings. The volume is divided into four parts. The first part provides the backgrounds of the authors and texts discussed in the volume. The second concerns the manifold functions and appearances of Byzantine satirical texts. Part three offers detailed analyses of three largely unexplored texts (the Charidemos, the Philopatris, and the Anacharsis). The last section moves from the individual texts to the larger picture of satirical modes in Middle Byzantium.

Contributors are Baukje van den Berg, Floris Bernard, Stavroula Constantinou, Eric Cullhed, Janek Kucharski, Markéta Kulhánková, Paul Magdalino, Henry Maguire, Przemysław Marciniak, Charis Messis, Ingela Nilsson, Emilie van Opstall, Panagiotis Roilos, and Nikos Zagklas.

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