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How to legally assess the situation when humanitarian actors in non-international armed conflicts are arbitrarily denied access to the affected civilian population? The book answers this question from the perspective of the five main actors involved in humanitarian relief in non-international armed conflicts: the affected State, non-State armed groups, humanitarian actors, non-belligerent States and the affected civilian population. It examines the legal regulations and consequences for each of these actors. In doing so, the book not only draws attention to existing legal gaps and challenges, but also encourages readers to rethink outdated legal concepts and discuss new approaches.

The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.
A Normative Account of the Acts that Constitute International Crimes
Author:
This book explores the normative dimensions of the acts that constitute international crimes. The book conceptualises the normative dimensions of these acts as processes of construction and meaning making. Developing a novel methodological approach, it identifies the narratives and discourses that emerge in practice as central for understanding the normative meanings of these acts. Using the crimes of attacks on cultural property, pillage, sexual violence and reproductive violence as case studies, the book offers a historical, conceptual, and discursive analysis of these crimes to develop a dynamic, pluralist and socially constructed account of wrong in international criminal law.
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Associate Editor:
This volume examines lessons learned in over two decades of ICC practice. It discusses macro issues, such as universality, selectivity, new technologies, complementarity, victims and challenges in the life cycle of cases, as well as ways to re-think the ICC regime in light of the Independent Expert Review, aggression against Ukraine, and novel global challenges.
It is statistically unlikely that humans are the only intelligent species in the universe. Nothing about the others will be known until contact is made beyond a radio signal from space that merely tells us they existed when it was sent. That contact may occur tomorrow, in a hundred years, or never. If it does it will be a high-risk scenario for humanity. It may be peaceful or hostile. Relying on alien altruism and benign intentions is wishful thinking. We need to begin identifying as a planetary species, and develop a global consensus on how to respond in either scenario.
This book brings together prominent scholars in the fields of international cultural heritage law and heritage studies to scrutinise the various branches of international law and governance dealing with heritage destruction from human rights perspectives, both in times of armed conflict as well as in peace. Importantly, it also examines cases of heritage destruction that may not be intentional, but rather the consequence of large-scale infrastructural development or resource extraction. Chapters deal with high profile cases from Europe, North Africa, The Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, with a substantial afterword on heritage destruction in Ukraine.
Editor:
The Annotated Digest of the International Criminal Court is an annual or biennial series, which compiles a selection of the most significant legal findings rendered in public decisions of the International Criminal Court. It is devised, first and foremost, as a reference tool for academics and practitioners of international criminal law to enable efficient and thorough research of ICC jurisprudence.

Abstracts of the legal findings are selected based on the following criteria:
1) clarification or interpretation of a rule or a point of law;
2) application of a specific rule as applied by a Chamber; or
3) findings or rulings which are otherwise meaningful with respect to international justice, human rights, international humanitarian law.

Each abstract is inserted after the article(s) of the Statute, Rules of Procedure and Evidence and Regulations of the Court to which it corresponds, together with a short description or summary of its relevance. This quick reference system makes it easy to refer to other decisions quoted elsewhere in the Digest.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.

Series Editors: and
Scope and Aims
Launched in 2018, the European Criminal Justice Series provides a forum for high-quality scholarship on the European dimensions of crime, criminal law, criminal policy, and punishment. Publications in the series provide insight into how crime, criminal law and criminal justice is developing within the European Union and on the European continent, both from a legal and criminological perspectives. The series particularly welcomes monographs but is also open to edited volumes.

Information for Authors
Authors who are interested to publish in the European Criminal Justice Series, are invited to submit a proposal for consideration by the editorial board. For questions regarding the European Criminal Justice Series, or to submit a proposal, please contact the Editorial Board. The Editorial Board consists of the board members of the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and two additional members. Each manuscript will be reviewed by the two editors-in-chief and by either one or two board members – depending on the topic and the required expertise.