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The Yearbook brings together a collection of studies that discuss legal problems raised by cultural differences between people and the law to which they are subject.
The International Yearbook for Legal Anthropology has been discontinued.
The Studies in International Minority and Group Rights series explores the rights of and situations facing minority persons and groups. It will provide a forum for the publication of monographs, postdoctoral research projects, other academic studies, conference reports, compilations of relevant documents and other materials that are likely to be of special interest to the readers of the Series.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Series Editors: and
Increasing legal integration and interdependency places comparative studies at the heart of legal analysis. Research identifying the converging elements and principles in view of a common legal culture of diversity is necessary. This is particularly true for its territorial and socio-cultural dimensions as these regard the organization of living-together.
Regarding territorial diversity, the interaction of multiple levels of government in addressing complex governance issues and its regulation is of utmost interest. Comparative federal and autonomy studies shall explore theoretical perspectives and foundations, as well as specific policy areas, exploring in depth pluralistic governance and decision-making. Social and cultural diversity implies a modern understanding of the accommodation of multiple groups’ claims sharing the same territory. Going beyond traditional studies on minorities and their rights, new challenges in the accommodation of differences have to be addressed, including the accommodation of non-traditional forms of diversity. Moreover, often the same instruments can be used for the management of territorial as well as for social and cultural diversities. While privileging a comparative constitutional approach, the series faces new methodological demands and includes trans-disciplinary studies in order to meet the contemporary challenge of diversity in an integrated legal space, in Europe and beyond.
Personal, Political, and Intellectual Perspectives from the First-Generation Doctoral Experience
This collection is an inspiring compilation of personal narratives that delve into the remarkable journeys of first-generation doctoral graduates in education. It unveils their struggles, triumphs, and transformations as they navigate academia, driven by passion and a commitment to breaking barriers. Their stories depict resilience, resistance, and the pursuit of excellence as they confront the challenges of being the first in their families to embark on the rigorous, intellectually demanding path of obtaining a doctoral degree. From diverse backgrounds, cultures, and disciplines, some of these first-gen docs now serve as advisers to the next generation of doctoral students.

Readers will be captivated by narratives of sacrifice, courage, and academic identity formation, shedding light on the transformative impact on families and communities. First-Gen Docs: Personal, Political, and Intellectual Perspectives from the First-Generation Doctoral Experience underscores the role of mentors, allies, and inclusivity, inspiring future generations in academia and beyond.

Contributors are: Nur Diyanah Anwar, Miguel Baique, Nina Bascia, Kathy Bickmore, Jinny Menon, Elizabeth Montaño, Newton Asakhulu Mukolwe, R. Nanre Nafziger, Yecid Ortega, Crystena A. H. Parker-Shandal, Rosaisela Rodriguez, Janel Janiczek Smith and Zora Wolfe.
Studies on Global Practices of Isolation, Punishment, and Education of the Unwanted
Volume Editors: and
The island has historically played a special role in the cultural imagination – sometimes as a place of promise of tranquillity; at other times the remoteness has seemed attractive for more sinister reasons. Using islands for extreme exclusion has a long history and remains important for understanding the complexities of inclusive education. This volume presents new case studies of island exclusion of prisoners, people with disability, and refugees in the Global North and South. It also offers reflections on practices of re-inclusion and the larger issues of inclusive education.
What is the status of indigenous religious rights in the world today? Despite important legal advances in the protection of indigenous religious beliefs and practices at the international and national levels, there are still many obstacles to the full implementation of these provisions. Using a unique large-scale comparative approach, this book aims to identify the fundamental issues that characterize the law of indigenous religions in several countries, as well as certain avenues that may prove useful in state implementation of the provisions of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples regarding practice, promotion, transmission, protection, and access to spiritual heritage.
Critical Perspectives on the Accommodation of Religious Diversities
The accommodation of religious diversity in contemporary pluralist societies is undoubtedly amongst the most salient issues on today’s political agenda, not least due to the challenges posed by migration. A subject of considerable debate is how to reconcile the demands of religious and cultural diversity alongside political unity, that is, how to create a political community that is cohesive and stable and satisfies the legitimate aspirations of minorities. This volume provides a critical analysis of the institutional accommodations and legal frameworks conceived by and/or for historical religious groups and assesses their potential and shortcomings in providing for an integrated society based on human- and minority rights protection.
The adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) on 10 December 1948 by the United Nations General Assembly marked a groundbreaking moment in the field of international law. Not only would it start to move away from its original conception as an exclusively State-centered domain: it would also mark the progressive transformation of international law into a law for humankind. This instrument started a codification and institution-building process that would slowly evolve into a complex framework of treaties, bodies and procedures revolving around the protection of the human being against the actions – or omissions – of the State. This commentary provides a specific analysis and reflection of how each one of the rights enshrined therein have evolved over time.