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Challenged Justice: In Pursuit of Judicial Independence is an academic continuation of the previous volumes on judicial Independence edited by Shimon Shetreet, with others: Jules Deschenes, Christopher Forsyth, and Wayne McCormack. All books were published by Brill Nijhoff: Judicial Independence: The Contemporary Debate (1985), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Conceptual Foundations and Practical Challenges (2012), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Rule of Law and World Peace (2014) and The Culture of Judicial Independence in a Globalised World (2016).
This book offers academic articles by distinguished jurists on judicial independence and judicial process in many jurisdictions including indicators of justice and analysis of international Standards on judicial independence and judicial ethics.
Author: Vedna Jivan
This volume in the Brill Research Perspectives in Comparative Discrimination Law compares sex discrimination protection through three thematic lenses. Firstly, it charts and compares the evolution sex discrimination protection in human rights law in three treaty-bodies - the CEDAW Committee, the HRC and the CESCR. Second, it traces the development of sex discrimination protection in three domestic law frameworks – the United States, Australia and India. Finally, it compares the development of sex discrimination protection in international law with its development in the domestic laws of the three countries and analyses the implications of that comparison. Despite differences in the translation of international approaches to sex discrimination into domestic law and differences in social, political and cultural contexts, women appear to face similar limitations in accessing justice through sex discrimination frameworks.
This book examines different approaches by which states characterised by federal or decentralized arrangements reconcile equality and autonomy. In case studies from four continents, leading experts analyse the challenges of ensuring institutional, social and economic equality whilst respecting the competences of regions and the rights of groups.
This book argues that a view has taken root in Africa, which equates state-secularism to the aggressive removal of religion from the public sphere or even state ambivalence towards religious affairs. This view arises from a misguided interpretation of the practice of state-secularism particularly in France, Turkey and the US, which understanding is ill-suited for the sub-Sahara Africa’s state-religion because the region boasts of at least three major religious traditions, African religion, Islam and Christianity, and blanket condemnation of public manifestation of religion or ambivalence towards it may offend the natural flourishing of this trinity and more. The contribution holds that most applications of state-secularism in Kenya, Nigeria and Uganda favour the Christian faith, which during its tumultuous experiences in Europe survived the enlightenment, the reformation and like experiences socialised to co-exist with what are now called secular states. Additionally, due to the long history of Christendoms in Europe, Christian principles penetrated the colonial legal systems that were bequeathed to Africa at independence and the sustenance of the colonial legacy means that the Abrahamic faith has an upper hand in the state-religion relations’ contest. The obvious loser is African religion which has suffered major onslaughts since the colonial days.
Practical and Theoretical Challenges to 21st Century Federalism
Beyond Autonomy forces us to rethink the meaning of autonomy as a central organising pillar of federalism. Can federations exist beyond the autonomy realm designed to promote territorial self-governance and direct representation among various levels of government? How do governments of federal systems interact over the design and implementation of policy in highly topical areas such as security, where the optimal distribution of authority is blurred? Which mechanisms promote the compromise necessary in many of today’s democratic federal systems? How do newly emerging federations in Africa and Asia design federal institutions in order to decrease conflict while promoting national solidarity? How can federal systems protect the rights of non-territorial minorities such as many indigenous peoples?
The Chinese and Comparative Law Series is a refereed scholarly series dedicated to the publication of studies of Chinese law in English, including works solely on Chinese law or Chinese law in a comparative legal context. The series also welcomes edited volumes. It aims for critical analyses of Chinese law in a broad sense and the presentation of legal developments in China to an international audience of lawyers and non-lawyers. It welcomes studies in all areas of law and studies of an interdisciplinary nature. Titles in the Chinese and Comparative Law series will be of particular interest to the international community of academics and practising lawyers, policy makers, national and international governmental and non-governmental organisations, and others interested in the study of comparative law.

This series critically examines issues of legal doctrine and practice in Central and Eastern Europe, including studies on the harmonization of legal principles and rules; the legal impact of the intertwining of domestic economies, on the one hand, with regional economies and the processes of international trade and investment on the other. The series offers a forum for discussion of topical questions of public and private law from domestic, regional, and international perspectives. Comparative research that provides insights in legal developments that can be communicated to those interested in questions, not only of law, but also of politics, economics, and of society of countries in the region also finds a home in the series.

For information about a related title, visit the webpages of the Brill journal Review of Central and East European Law.
Legal Challenges in the New Digital Age addresses a wide range of legal issues related to emerging technologies. These technologies pose prominent legal challenges, in particular, how to wedge new phenomena into old frameworks; whether we can and should delegate responsibilities to technologies and how to cope with newly created powers of manipulation. Edited by Ana Mercedes Lopez Rodriguez, Michael D. Green and Maria Lubomira Kubica, the book’s sixteen chapters are written by highly qualified international practitioners and academics from different jurisdictions. Familiarity with the intricacies of emerging technologies is essential for judges, practitioners, legal staff, business people and scholars. This book’s combination of highly thought-provoking topics and in-depth analysis will prove indispensable to all interested parties.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. Volume 38 features a set of Special Issue papers on the theme of ‘The Backlash against International Law: Australian Perspectives’. These articles originated as papers presented to a June 2019 workshop at the Australian National University (ANU), which launched a global research partnership project between scholars at ANU, Indiana University and the University of Maryland.
Colonial Adventures: Commercial Law and Practice in the Making addresses the question how and to what extend the development of commercial law and practice, from Ancient Greece to the colonial empires of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, were indebted to colonial expansion and maritime trade. Illustrated by experiences in Ancient Europe, the Americas, Asia, Africa and Australia, the book examines how colonial powers, whether consciously or not, reshaped the law in order to foster the prosperity of homeland manufacturers and entrepreneurs or how local authorities and settlers brought the transplanted law in line with the colonial objectives and the local constraints amid shifting economic, commercial and political realities.

Contributors are: Alain Clément (†), Alexander Claver, Oscar Cruz-Barney, Bas De Roo, Paul du Plessis, Bernard Durand, David Gilles, Petra Mahy, David Mirhady, M. C. Mirow, Luigi Nuzzo, Phillip Lipton, Umakanth Varottil, and Jakob Zollmann.