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The compatibility of ISDS in Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) and the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) with the autonomy of EU law
The EU’s participation in international dispute resolution mechanisms presents particular problems owing to its multilevel governance and its autonomy from international and national law. The inclusion of foreign direct investment in the Common Commercial policy in the Treaty of Lisbon, expanded those to investment arbitrations under Member States’ BITs, as the Court of Justice ruled in Achmea. EU Law and International Investment Arbitration, examines the impact of that inclusion beyond Achmea, from the perspectives of international and EU law, to the remaining extra-EU BITs of the Member States and the Energy Charter Treaty.
Author: Niovi Vavoula
In this book, Niovi Vavoula examines the privacy challenges raised by the establishment, operation and reconfiguration of EU-wide information systems that store personal data, including biometrics, of different categories of third-country nationals that may be used for various immigration related and law enforcement purposes. The monograph analyses both the currently operational databases – Schengen Information System (SIS), Visa Information System (VIS) and Eurodac – and forthcoming systems – Entry/Exit System (EES), European Travel Information and Authorisation Systems (ETIAS) and European Criminal Record Information System for Third-Country Nationals (ECRIS-TCN) – as well as their future interoperability. To assess the compatibility of legal instruments governing information systems and their interoperability with the right to respect for private life, the author calls for the centrality of privacy as the appropriate lens through which instruments involving the processing of personal data should be viewed and offers a typology of privacy standards based on relevant case law by the Strasbourg and Luxemburg Courts.
"This is a ground-breaking book, the first comprehensive analysis of the growing interrelationship between immigration law and privacy law. The book is essential reading for academics, policy makers and legal practitioners working in these fields, and will lead in informing the debate on the relationship between security and human rights in Europe. Rigorous and ambitious, the book will become a reference point in the field."
Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas, Professor of Criminal Law and Global Security, Queen Mary and Westfield School of Law, London.
Volume 1, Cross-cutting Themes
This authoritative commentary drafted by scholars of the Academic Network on the European Social Charter and Social Rights (ANESC) is aimed at academic researchers studying social and economic rights in Europe and legal practitioners, civil society organisations, trade unions and state representatives engaging with the procedures of the European Committee of Social Rights. The text is composed of contributions from a large number of experts, bringing together senior and young scholars across different countries and legal traditions with expertise in social and economic rights and a commitment to enhancing the European system for regulating these rights.

The commentary offers 106 chapters, organised into eight volumes, some of which are focused on the substantive obligations of State Parties to the European Social Charter and the practice of the European Committee of Social Rights and others on the procedures that state representatives, international bodies and applicants must follow to engage with the Charter system.

Volume 1, entitled Cross-Cutting Themes, provides readers with descriptive and analytical accounts of the birth and evolution of the Charter system, the rules governing its interactions with domestic authorities, a number of thematic areas and concepts that elucidate the spirit of the treaty, and the differences and synergies between the European Social Charter and other European and international regulatory frameworks. This volume lays the groundwork for the article-by-article commentary on the European Social Charter that will be presented in the subsequent seven volumes, providing crucial context and highlighting the conceptual and operational links between the various Charter provisions. This first volume is edited by Stefano Angeleri (Queen’s University Belfast) and Carole Nivard (Université de Rouen).
Editor: Marc Maresceau
Studies in EU External Relations is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to the legal, political, trade and historical aspects of the EU's relations with non-member states or regions or other international organisations.

Focusing on the EU's position and role in the world, the series covers the Union’s bilateral as well as its multilateral relations with third countries. This coverage extends to institutional, legal and political issues on or affecting external relations, as well as to specific sectoral substantive topics, including migration, defence or trade matters for example. The series also includes monographs on the external dimension of substantive domestic EU policies (competition, environment, etc). In addition, the series welcomes studies on various facets of the EU enlargement phenomenon and the European Neighbourhood Policy.

Manuscript Submission:

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to Marie Sheldon.

For further information on book proposals and manuscript submission, please see our Author Gateway.
A Computable Approach to Criminal Procedure Law
The volume presents an innovative analysis of defence rights in EU criminal proceedings through the lens of a computational approach to the law. This multi-level research tackles both EU law and national legislation, as well as case-law on defence rights in criminal proceedings.
The comparative analysis on procedural safeguards is integrated by legal informatics, that led to the translation into computable language of the relevant EU and national legislation.
Such multidisciplinary approach allows, through a semiautomated technology, to better highlight potentially uncovered deficit of the normative texts, and to enhance comparative analysis of legal systems.
The breakthrough perspective brings a novel viewpoint to the debate on criminal procedure rights, shading light on the potential emerging from the interaction between criminal law and technology.
The Legal Regulation of Environmental Crime - The International and European Dimension provides a comprehensive analysis of the international and EU legal regimes for tackling environmental crime. The book includes an in-depth analysis of the major international conventions as they relate to the regulation of environmental crime (CITES, Basel, MARPOL) and provides a holistic overview of the evolution and content of EU law in the field of environmental crime, covering substantive criminal law harmonisation, judicial cooperation and the role of EU criminal justice bodies and agencies (Europol, Eurojust and the EPPO) in fighting environmental crime. Further, the book addresses key recent policy and legislative developments in the field and offers a timely contribution to legal reform in view of the publication of new proposals on legislation on environmental crime at EU level.
Volume 6 (2021), Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA
With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while other fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
This Review is the first law yearbook that is specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.
Reconciling Free Movement of Capital with Public Interest Objectives
This book explores how the EU free movement of capital provisions can be interpreted in order to allow certain forms of State participation in the market for the purposes of protecting public interest objectives in the context of privatisations and golden shares. Drawing from the international controversy regarding the risks and benefits of capital liberalisation, the book argues that the broad interpretation of ‘capital restrictions’ under Article 63 TFEU has significant consequences for national political economy choices and investigates the extent to which the existing legal framework set out in the Treaties offers room for reconciling economic integration with societal values.
Perspectives in International, European and Constitutional Law
Volume Editors: Benedikt C. Harzl and Roman Petrov
The book, which covers contributions from leading international and European law scholars and analyzes the legal and political status quo of non-recognized entities, comprises three parts. The first and the second part focus on contemporary trends of legal theory and practice concerning issues pertaining to secession and non-recognized entities in international and European law, respectively. Additionally, it touches upon EU policies, the issue of EU citizenship in light of secessionist movements in Europe, and the phenomenon of exterritorial naturalization within non-recognized entities. The third part scrutinizes the legal systems of non-recognized entities in the post-Soviet area, covering Eastern Ukraine, Abkhazia, South Ossetia, Transnistria, and Nagorno-Karabakh.
Dr. Natasha Stamenkovikj offers a comparative analysis of the scope and application of the right to the truth as a fundamental right in public international law, and as a concept in European policies for promoting peace and transitional justice.
The book provides a systematized assessment of the conceptualisation of the right to the truth in the enlargement policy of the Council of Europe as applied towards the former Yugoslav societies. By assessing the coherence of the Council’s standardization on the right to the truth, Dr. Stamenkovikj addresses the legitimacy of the Council as an exporter of values and creator of norms.