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The contributions in this collection of the American Classics in International Law series, Peaceful Resolution of Disputes, edited by Lori Fisler Damrosch, present the most influential American ideas about dispute settlement. From Alexander Hamilton’s 1794 defense of arbitration, through 20th-century debates over the International Court of Justice and other international courts and tribunals, to contemporary controversies over law-of-the-sea dispute settlement, American leaders and scholars have promoted perspectives on dispute resolution shaped by the American experience. An introductory essay explores American ideas about dispute resolution in relation to war, the judicial role in resolving concrete controversies under law, and problems of institutional design.
Contributions by International Courts and Tribunals
Challenged Justice: In Pursuit of Judicial Independence is an academic continuation of the previous volumes on judicial Independence edited by Shimon Shetreet, with others: Jules Deschenes, Christopher Forsyth, and Wayne McCormack. All books were published by Brill Nijhoff: Judicial Independence: The Contemporary Debate (1985), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Conceptual Foundations and Practical Challenges (2012), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Rule of Law and World Peace (2014) and The Culture of Judicial Independence in a Globalised World (2016).
This book offers academic articles by distinguished jurists on judicial independence and judicial process in many jurisdictions including indicators of justice and analysis of international Standards on judicial independence and judicial ethics.
In A Multifaceted Approach to Trade Liberalisation and Investment Protection in the Energy Sector, Elena Cima and Makane Moïse Mbengue bring together leading academics and practitioners to discuss the most significant challenges faced by trade liberalization and investment protection in the energy sector. At the same time, they address the environmental and human rights issues that often underlie these challenges, in a skillful attempt to bridge the gap between these different perspectives and ultimately pave the way to a multi-faceted and comprehensive approach to the subject matter.
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. Each volume of the Review includes general articles, current developments, and the comprehensive annual digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews and shorter book notes. Volume 24 covers 2019 and features contributions from the conference ’50 Years Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT)’
This book casts new light on the application of the principle of proportionality in international law. Proportionality is claimed to play a central role in governing the exercise of public power in international law and has been presented as the ‘ultimate rule of law’. It has also been the subject of fierce criticism: it is argued that it leads to unreflexive and arbitrary application of the law and deprives rights of their role as a ’firewall’ protecting individuals. But the debate on proportionality has tended to focus on the question of ‘how’ proportionality should be carried out. Much less attention has been devoted to the question of ‘who’.
This edited volume bring together scholars from a wide range of areas of international law to consider that question: whose interests are at stake when courts and other legal authorities apply the principle of proportionality? In so doing, this volume casts new light on the role which proportionality can play in international law, in shaping and modulating the power relations between the different entities governed by it.
In this comparative and analytical study, G. Matteo Vaccaro-Incisa offers the most comprehensive and detailed account of China's Treaty Policy and Practice in International Investment Law and Arbitration published to date. After outlining the evolution of China's macroeconomics and ideological stance toward foreign investment, the author analyzes the relationship between the model investment treaties China adopted over the time and those of other traditional key players in the field (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Netherlands). Most innovatively, by analytically surveying several key provisions (including ISDS, expropriation, MFN, NT, FET, FPS) of 120 International Investment Agreements concluded by China, this work manages to draw an objective assessment of the investment treaty policy and practice of a nation that has quickly become a leading importer and exporter of capital across the globe.
Domestic Courts, Commercial Arbitration Institutions and Tribunal Jurisdiction
Author: Joel Dahlquist
Arbitration clauses in investment treaties often provide investors with a choice between ICSID arbitration, on the one hand, and rules originally drafted for commercial arbitration on the other. The Use of Commercial Arbitration Rules in Investment Treaty Disputes studies how domestic courts and commercial arbitration institutions impact the scope of arbitral tribunal jurisdiction when commercial arbitration rules are used.

Based on extensive studies of court decisions and previously-unknown arbitral awards, Joel Dahlquist’s book analyses the practice of domestic courts in reviewing treaty-based jurisdiction, and explains how the two most used commercial arbitration institutions – the ICC and the SCC – have drafted, interpreted and applied their arbitration rules in treaty-based disputes.
Social License and Dispute Resolution in the Extractive Industries is a broad collection offering insights from both renowned academics and practitioners on the intersection of international dispute resolution and the social license to operate in the extractive industries. With its combined academic and practical perspective, the book focuses on mining disputes and addresses a broad array of issues, such as third party funding, grievance and redress, as well as the protection of human rights and the environment. In addition, it is the first work in the market that discusses the proposed rules of the world's first and only Global Natural Resources Dispute Resolution Center (GNDC).