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Covering all seven countries on the isthmus, this volume presents the first collection of original linguistic studies on Central American Spanish varieties, which have long been neglected in Hispanic Linguistics. The analyses in this collection span across disciplines such as sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics, bilingualism, historical linguistics, and pragmatics. This volume bridges the gap between international and Central American scholars, as it highlights the work that has already been done by Central American scholars but is relatively unknown to scholars outside of the region. It also introduces readers to more recent work that sheds new light on Central American Spanish varieties, from both urban and rural settings as well as in bilingual communities where Spanish is in contact with indigenous languages.
Reaching out into the rural English teaching and learning environment led to compiling these chapters that exemplify the possibilities and achievements of teachers worldwide. Often with overly large classes, isolation, and few resources, English instruction leads to extrinsic success for their students with future educational, professional, and economic outcomes. In other instances, the fruits of teachers’ labor become intrinsic motivators for learners who value learning and critical thinking. English in the international curriculum has perceived value for developing human and social capital, as indicated in these authors’ personal and professional journeys.

This volume was originally begun by Paul Chamness Iida, who sadly passed away in June 2021. The editors have done their best to complete this project as he envisioned and share this work in his honor.

Contributors are: Mary Frances Agnello, Md. Al Amin, Naoko Araki, Monica A. Baker, Xingtan Cao, Mary Coady, Florent Domenach, Lee E. Friederich, Arely Romero García, Maribel Villegas Greene, Janinka Greenwood, Dongni Guo, Paul Chamness Iida (deceased), Irham Irham, Munchuree Kaosayapandhu, Wuri P. Kusumastuti, Di Liang, Carla Meskill, Erin Mikulec, Piotr Romanowski, Leticia Araceli Salas Serrano, Fang Wang, Emilia Wąsikiewicz-Firlej, Jing Yixuan, Jing Zhiyuan and Dai Chang Zhi.
Volume Editors: and
The development of teaching and learning materials is an essential component of endangered language revitalisation, yet there is very little academic research on this crucial topic. Our volume seeks to address this imbalance by examining endangered language pedagogical materials from around the world including traditional resources such as grammars, dictionaries, and textbooks, as well as new media such as online courses, apps, video games, etc. Chapters provide theoretical and applied perspectives, and consider Indigenous and other threatened languages from various regions of the world including the Americas, Australia, Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia. This volume is the first in the FEL Yearbook Series.
A Study in Historical Dialectology and Linguistic Classification
The Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek (Lesbian, Thessalian, and Boeotian) are characterised by a small bundle of commonly shared innovations, yet at the same time they exhibit remarkable linguistic diversity. While traditionally classified together in modern scholarship since the nineteenth century, in recent decades doubt has been cast on whether they form a coherent dialectal subgroup of Ancient Greek. In this monograph Matthew Scarborough outlines the history of problem of Aeolic classification from antiquity to the present day, collects and analyses the primary evidence for the linguistic innovations that unite and divide the group, and contributes an innovative new statistical methodology for evaluating highly contested genetic subgroupings in dialectology, ultimately arguing in support of the traditional classification.
Author:
This book presents an empirically based examination of language patterns found among the Israeli Druze community, which is profiled against that of the Arabs in Israel. The results document the emergence of a mixed language previously undescribed and provides a socio-political analysis.
This study intends thus to make a contribution to the debate on "mixed languages", introducing a model that facilitates the analysis of the link bewteen codeswitching and sociopolitical identity. Special attention is paid to the assessment of language and identity issues of Golan Heights Druze and Israeli Druze, taking into exam two major political debates within these communities, regarding the Israeli Nation-state Law and the so-called ‘Syrian–Israeli secret Golan deal’ speculation.