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Evaluating His Legacy over the Last Sixty Years
Volume Editor: Stanley E. Porter
James Barr is a widely recognized name in biblical studies, even if he is still best known for his The Semantics of Biblical Language. Barr’s Semantics, although first published in 1961, still generates animated discussion of its claims. However, over his lengthy career Barr published significant scholarship on a wide variety of topics within Old Testament studies and beyond. This volume provides an assessment of Barr’s contribution to biblical studies sixty years after the publication of his first and still memorable volume on biblical semantics. As a result, this volume includes essays on major topics such as the Hebrew language, lexical semantics, lexicography, the Septuagint, and biblical theology.
Author: Martin Hilpert
In this book, Martin Hilpert lays out how Construction Grammar can be applied to the study of language change. In a series of ten lectures on Diachronic Construction Grammar, the book presents the theoretical foundations, open questions, and methodological approaches that inform the constructional analysis of diachronic processes in language. The lectures address issues such as constructional networks, competition between constructions, shifts in collocational preferences, and differentiation and attraction in constructional change. The book features analyses that utilize modern corpus-linguistic methodologies and that draw on current theoretical discussions in usage-based linguistics. It is relevant for researchers and students in cognitive linguistics, corpus linguistics, and historical linguistics.
Knowledge can be expressed in language using a plethora of grammatical means. Four major groups of meanings related to knowledge are Evidentiality: grammatical expression of information source; Egophoricity: grammatical expression of access to knowledge; Mirativity: grammatical expression of expectation of knowledge; and Epistemic modality: grammatical expression of attitude to knowledge. The four groups of categories interact. Some develop overtones of the others. Evidentials stand apart from other means in many ways, including their correlations with speech genres and social environment. This essay presents a framework which connects the expression of knowledge across the world's languages in a coherent way, showing their dependencies and complexities, and pathways of historical development in various scenarios, including language obsolescence.
The study of temporal reference represents an all-embracing domain from which many miscellaneous and complex problems emerge. The Chronos Studies collection proposes monographs which are representative for the diversity of the approaches currently found in the field of temporal semantics. The reader will find here, among others, studies dedicated to the temporality of the verb in general; to particular verb tenses; to modality; to the issue of aspect and Aktionsart; to temporal subordination; or to the interaction of tense and temporal adverbial complements. This collection stands open to different theoretical approaches, in order to offer interesting but also unexpected perspectives on a field that many linguists are fascinated with.

L’étude de la référence temporelle constitue un domaine très vaste où se dégagent des problématiques diverses et complexes. La collection Études Chronos propose des monographies représentatives de la diversité des approches actuelles dans le domaine de la sémantique temporelle. Le lecteur y trouvera, entre autres, des études consacrées à la temporalité du verbe en général, à des temps verbaux particuliers, à la modalité, à la problématique de l’aspect et du mode d’action, aux subordonnées temporelles, à l’interaction entre les temps verbaux et les compléments de temps. Cette collection s’ouvre à diverses approches théoriques, afin de jeter des regards intéressants et parfois inattendus sur un domaine qui passionne beaucoup de linguistes.
The chapters collected in the volume Passives Cross-Linguistically provide analyses of passive constructions across different languages and populations from the interface perspectives between syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. The contributions are, in principle, all based on the background of generative grammatical theory. In addition to the theoretical contributions of the first part of this volume, all solidly built on rich empirical bases, some experimental works are presented, which explore passives from a psycholinguistic perspective based on theoretical insights. The languages/language families covered in the contributions include South Asian languages (Odia/Indo-Aryan and Telugu/Dravidian, but also Kharia/Austro-Asiatic), Japanese, Arabic, English, German, Modern Greek, and several modern Romance varieties (Catalan, Romanian, and especially southern Italian dialects) as well as Vedic Sanskrit and Ancient Greek.
Author: R.M.W. Dixon
Many works on linguistic typology deal in some detail with one or more particular grammatical topics without clearly demonstrating how these relate to other categories or construction types. The Essence of Linguistic Analysis by R. M. W. Dixon presents a framework which connects individual topics in a cogent and coherent way, showing their dependencies and locating each in its place within the overall tapestry of a language.
A clear distinction is made between semantic roles and syntactic functions. And it is held that the basic constituents of a language are lexical elements. Grammatical items serve to link together lexical units. At every level of analysis, the central units are lexical with grammar providing ancillary indicators.
Non-agentive Verbs and Perfect Expression in Early Germanic
Author: R. Moses Katz
Gothic is unique among Germanic languages in regards to the ways it expresses non-agentive actions. It both retains a formal passive and has two periphrastic passives. In addition it presents an intransitive verb class with generally inchoative meaning. R. Moses Katz examines the semantics of these categories and shows how they provide a robust non-agentive paradigm in Gothic, including a functional, result-state perfect in the passive. In two parts, he examines first the inchoative verb and then the periphrastic passive. He proposes that the development of both types is underpinned by a single argument structure based on the resultative, a coordinated event type that links a transition with a resulting state.
Verbs of mental states or activity constitute a subject of considerable interest to both Cognitive Linguistics and Linguistic Typology. They promise to open a window on the invisible workings of the mind, while at the same time displaying a wide variety of historical sources across languages. In this book Michael Fortescue presents an innovative approach to the semantics and diachronic source of cognitive verbs across a representative array of the world’s languages. The relationship among the cognitive verbs of individual languages is essentially one of metonymy, and the book investigates in detail the specific metonymic relationships involved, as revealed largely by the polysemous spread of word meanings. The data is projected against a circular ‘map’ of interrelated cognitive categories.
Volume Editor: Tabea Ihsane
This volume edited by Tabea Ihsane focuses on different aspects of the distribution, semantics, and internal structure of nominal constituents with a “partitive article” in its indefinite interpretation and of potentially corresponding bare nouns. It further deals with diachronic issues, such as grammaticalization and evolution in the use of “partitive articles”.
The outcome is a snapshot of current research into “partitive articles” and the way they relate to bare nouns, in a cross-linguistic perspective and on new data: the research covers noteworthy data (fieldwork data and corpora) from Standard languages - like French and Italian, but also German - to dialectal and regional varieties, including endangered ones like Francoprovençal.
The Use of Common Sense Reasoning in Conversation
In Enthymemes and Topoi in Dialogue, Ellen Breitholtz presents a novel and precise account of reasoning from an interactional perspective. The account draws on the concepts of enthymemes and topoi, originating in Aristotelian rhetoric and dialectic, and integrates these in a formal dialogue semantic account using TTR, a type theory with records.
Argumentation analysis and formal approaches to reasoning often focus the logical validity of arguments on inferences made in discourse from a god’s-eye perspective. In contrast, Breitholtz’s account emphasises the individual perspectives of interlocutors and the function and acceptability of their reasoning in context. This provides an analysis of interactions where interlocutors have access to different topoi and therefore make different inferences.