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Volume Editor:
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology, A.D. 284-650, across the late antique world, from Catalonia to Cappadocia. The first volume includes an overview of research, and papers exploring bioarchaeology, mortuary rituals, mausolea, and funerary landscapes. It considers the sacralisation of tombs, movements of relics, and the political significance of cemeteries. The fate of statue monuments is explored, as memorials for individuals. Authors also compare the spoliation or preservation of tombs to other buildings, and, finally, how the city itself, with its monuments, served as a place of collective memory, where meanings were long maintained.
The second volume includes papers exploring all aspects of funerary archaeology, from scientific samples in graves, to grave goods and tomb robbing and a bibliographic essay. It brings into focus neglected regions not usually considered by funerary archaeologists in NW Europe, such as the Levant, where burial archaeology is rich in grave good, to Sicily and Sardinia, where post-mortem offerings and burial manipulations are well-attested. We also hear from excavations in Britain, from Canterbury and London, and see astonishing fruits from the application of science to graves recently excavated in Trier.
Volume Editor:
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology, A.D. 284–650, across the late antique world. This first volume includes an overview of research, and papers exploring bioarchaeology, mortuary rituals, mausolea, and funerary landscapes. It considers the sacralisation of tombs, the movements of relics, and the political significance of cemeteries. The nature and fate of statue monuments is explored, as memorials to individuals. Authors also compare the destruction or preservation of tombs in relation to other buildings. Finally, the city itself is considered as a place of collective memory, where meanings were long maintained, via a study of spoliation.
Volume Editors: and
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology A.D. 284-650, by region. This second volume includes papers exploring all aspects of funerary archaeology, from scientific samples in graves, to grave goods and tomb robbing and a bibliographic essay. It brings into focus neglected regions not usually considered by funerary archaeologists in NW Europe, such as the Levant, where burial archaeology is rich in grave good, to Sicily and Sardinia, where post-mortem offerings and burial manipulations are well-attested. We also hear from excavations in Britain, from Canterbury and London, and see astonishing fruits from the application of science to graves recently excavated in Trier.
This series is devoted to the most recent scholarship the fields of art, architecture and archaeology in all regions of the Islamic world from the seventh century to the present. We encourage interdisciplinary perspectives to the study of Islamic visual and material culture and the application of innovative approaches drawn from other areas of art history, archaeology, anthropology, and critical theory. Contributions to the series range from analyses of single objects to wider thematic studies. The series is committed to highlighting the diverse character of Islamic material and visual culture, and to establishing common preoccupations that exist in the production, commissioning, use and appreciation of art and architectural forms across the Islamic world. The archaeological dimension of the series takes in final excavation reports and publications in areas including environmental archaeology and archaeological science. The series also incorporates studies that can function as fundamental resources for future research and teaching of Islamic visual and material culture. These resource books include critical surveys of published scholarship in aspects of Islamic art, architectural history, and archaeology. Surveys may be defined by material or according to disciplinary, dynastic, and geographical criteria. Other resource books comprise: translations and/or editions of significant primary texts relevant to the interpretation of Islamic art and architecture; and anthologies of translated texts useful for the study of selected topics, periods, or regions of the Islamic world. The series also welcomes English translations of pioneering and important works that have already been published in another language. Proposals will be accepted for both monographs and edited volumes.

If you are working on a book that would be suitable for this series, please do not hesitate to contact Acquisitions Editor Teddi Dols (Teddi.Dols@brill.com).

The series has published an average of 1,5 volumes per year since 2013.
An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World
Founded by Oleg Grabar in 1983, Muqarnas is the first academic journal devoted to art, architectural history, archaeology, as well as all aspects of Islamic visual and material cultures, historical and contemporary. Full-length articles are accompanied by shorter submissions grouped under a separate section titled “Notes and Sources,” for which we particularly welcome studies that introduce textual and visual primary sources. Muqarnas is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The first two volumes of Muqarnas were published by Yale University Press. For more information, see https://archnet.org/collections/43/publications/4420

Related series: Muqarnas, Supplements.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Submissions and Submission Guidelines:
Manuscripts should be submitted by email to the Managing Editor of Muqarnas at muqarnas@fas.harvard.edu.The deadline is March 1 for publication in November of the following year. A complete submission includes five elements:

1. Microsoft Word document of the main text file. Submissions should be double-spaced throughout in 12-point typeface. Use endnotes rather than footnotes; no bibliography is required. Articles should be no longer than 50 pages (not including endnotes).

2. Images. All submissions must be accompanied by images, with an upper limit of approximately 30. Low-resolution images are acceptable for initial consideration, with the expectation that authors will provide high-resolution TIFFs or JPEGs (at least 300 dpi at 4 x 6 inches) and secure all necessary permissions if the article is accepted for publication.

3. Captions file. Each image should be clearly labeled and have a corresponding caption that provides identifying information and appropriate image credits.

4. Abstract and keywords. Submit a 150- to 200-word abstract and 12 keywords for publication in the online version of the journal.

5. CV, stating the author’s institutional affiliation (if any), mailing address, phone number, as well as academic status and a list of publications.

Any submission that does not include these five elements will be returned to the author, as will articles that do not conform to the Muqarnas style sheet.

Articles must present original research that has not been published in any language previously. Authors must properly credit previous scholarship on the subject and cite the source of each quotation, with full bibliographic details given in the endnotes.

All articles are subject to review by the Editorial Committee and anonymous external readers, whose comments will be sent to the author only if the article is accepted for publication. Authors may be expected to make revisions based on the feedback of the readers and editors.

Muqarnas follows the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. For further specifications on preparing text and images for publication, see the Muqarnas style sheet: https://agakhan.fas.harvard.edu/files/agakhan/files/style_sheet_dec_2019.pdf

Source: https://agakhan.fas.harvard.edu/submission-guidelines
Material Culture, Socio-territorial Features, Archaeozoology and Archaeometry
Editor:
The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 3: Material Culture, Socio-territorial Features, Archaeozoology and Archaeometry, focuses on the study of material culture (pottery and glass), as well as on the archaeoscience activities that took place during the archaeological mission MAFOUB (2009-2023). The topics in this third, concluding volume concern environmental aspects, preliminary results on archaeozoology, the reconstruction of the evolution of the fauna over nineteen centuries, and politico-territorial aspects. It completes the urban and demographic framework that was presented in the previous two volumes.

Contributors: Anne Bouquillon, Jacopo Bruno, Yvan Coquinot, Delphine Decruyenaere, Christel Doublet, Ayano Endo, Nathalie Gandolfo, Takako Hosokawa, Marjan Mashkour, Djamal Mirzaakhmedov, Andrey Omelchenko, Elisa Porto, Silvia Pozzi, Gabriele Puschnigg, Rocco Rante, Pascale Richardin, Yoko Shindo, Toshiyasu Shinmen, Tamako Takeda, Manon Vuillien, Antoine Zink

The volume is co-published by Brill, Leiden, and the Louvre Museum, Paris.
Editors: and
Numinous Fields has its roots in a phenomenological understanding of perception. It seeks to understand what, beyond the mere sensory data they provide, landscape, nature, and art, both separately and jointly, may mean when we experience them. It focuses on actual or potential experiences of the numinous, or sacred, that such encounters may give rise to. This volume is multi-disciplinary in scope. It examines perceptions of place, space, nature, and art as well as perceptions of place, space, and nature in art. It includes chapters written by art curators, and historians and scholars in the fields of landscape, architecture, cultural geography, religious studies, philosophy, and art. Its chapters examine ideas, objects, and practices from the ancient time of Aboriginal Australians’ Dreaming through to the present. The volume is also multi-cultural in scope and includes chapters focussed on manifestations of the sacred in indigenous culture, in cultures influenced by each of the world’s major religions, and in the secular, contemporary world.

Foreword by Jeff Malpas

Contributors: Samer Akkach, James Bennett, Veronica della Dora, Alasdair Forbes, Virginia Hooker, Philip Jones, Russell Kelty, Muchammadun,Tracey Lock, Ellen Philpott-Teo, John Powell, Rebekah Pryor, Wendy Shaw.
Author:
Structured as five microhistories c. 632-705, this book offers a counternarrative for the formation of Islamic architecture and the Islamic state. It adopts a novel periodization informed by moments of historical violence and anxiety around caliphal identities in flux, animating histories of the minbar, throne, and maqsura as a principal nexus for navigating this anxiety. It expands outward to re-assess the mosque and palace with a focus on the Qubbat al-Khadraʾ and the Dar al-Imara in Kufa. It culminates in a reading of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem as a site where eschatological anxieties and political survival converge.
This volume, the second of three, offers an anthology of Western descriptions of Islamic religious buildings in Syria, Egypt and North Africa, mostly from the seventeenth to early twentieth centuries, taken from travel books and ambassadorial reports. (The third volume will deal with Islamic palaces around the Mediterranean.) As travel became easier and cheaper, thanks to better roads, steamships, hotels and railways, tourist numbers increased, museums accumulated eastern treasures, illustrated journals proliferated, and photography provided accurate data. All three deal with the impact of Western trade, taste and imports on the East, and examine the encroachment of westernised modernism.