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Before the invention of synthetic sponges, divers culled the seabeds of the Aegean for animal sponges or "sea gold" to supply global demand, while risking paralysis or death from decompression disease. This is a study of sponge diving and the impact of the industry on the inhabitants of Kalymnos and Mediterranean. It is a record of the 10,000 divers who died, the 20,000 who were paralysed between 1886 and 1910, and the women who were there to sustain them when they returned home.
Devoted to assessing the state of ocean and coastal governance, knowledge, and management, the Ocean Yearbook provides information in one convenient resource.

As in previous editions, articles provide multidisciplinary expert perspectives on contemporary issues. Each new volume draws on policy studies, international relations, international and comparative law, management, marine sciences, economics, and social sciences. Each volume contains key recent legal and policy instruments.

The Yearbook is a collaborative initiative of the International Ocean Institute (www.ioinst.org) in Malta and the Marine & Environmental Law Institute (www.dal.ca/law/MELAW) at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
Series Editors: James Kraska and Myron H. Nordquist

Professors Kraska and Nordquist at the Stockton Center for International Law produce selected edited volumes on Oceans Law and Policy, which explore the most important aspects of oceans law and policy. Supporting research, education, and capacity building on legal and public policy issues relating to the oceans, their engagements with scholars, government officials and international organizations promote interdisciplinary interaction to develop oceans governance at all levels, addressing international, national, regional, and state issues.
Editor:
This is the ultimate guide to international maritime boundaries. Its unique practical features include:
- systematic, expert analysis of all international maritime boundaries, joint development zones and unitization agreements worldwide;
- comprehensive coverage, including the text of every modern maritime boundary treaty concluded from 1942 to 2010;
- analysis of maritime boundaries established by decision of the International Court of Justice and ad hoc tribunals;
- detailed maps depicting individual boundaries in their geographic context;
- detailed regional maps to accompany reports examining the status of maritime boundary delimitation in eleven regions of the world;
- expert essays on specific topics in the development of maritime boundary theory and practice; and
- a country-by-country index for – enhanced access to the contents of this six-volume series.

International Maritime Boundaries is an unmatched comprehensive reference for international state practice concerning maritime boundary delimitation, and is used and referenced widely by practitioners and scholars of international law.

International Maritime Boundaries is also available online.
This Series has been discontinued after publication of Volume 18.
Editor:
The international straits of the world have generated intense demands and claims since the advent of seafaring and the early development of the Law of the Sea. Demands of access and control over these intense spaces continues to implicate the power and wealth of nations and all oceans users. The contemporary normative straits regime is a product of customary law, and specialized and general conventions. The regime regulates the rights and duties of coastal states and vessels over these potential chokepoints and, owing to new demands, it is under enhanced stress. The post-9-11 security environment and the resurgence of piracy have elevated the defense demands of maritime powers and coastal States. Non-state actors, including private armies, have acquired an enhanced capability to limit access to straits. Environmental concerns have created an added dimension of complexity to these narrow shipping lanes where coastal States increasingly demand additional regulatory measures such as mandatory pilotage and designation of PSSAs. The emergence from the current global financial crisis depends upon global trade including petroleum shipping. Most of that trade moves through the restricted ship operating areas of densely trafficked straits. Thus the public order of the oceans depends upon international straits for navigation, power and wealth. At no point in history has the erosion or reinforcement of straits norms been more critical for the world community.

This is the key moment to re-launch the series, The International Straits of the World. Books in the series will present (1) studies of individual geographic straits, and (2) studies of straits grouped by shared functions and problems. The re-launched series will revise or rewrite certain previously published books that merit more contemporary appraisal and add new straits studies.
Devoted to assessing the state of ocean and coastal governance, knowledge, and management, the Ocean Yearbook provides information in one convenient resource.

Articles provide multidisciplinary expert perspectives on contemporary issues. Each new volume draws on policy studies, international relations, international and comparative law, management, marine sciences, economics, and social sciences. Each volume contains key legal and policy instruments and an annually updated global directory of ocean-related organizations.

The Yearbook is a collaborative initiative of the International Ocean Institute (www.ioinst.org) in Malta and the Marine & Environmental Law Institute (www.dal.ca/law/MELAW) at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.

The Yearbook is also available online. Learn more about the electronic product here.

We are pleased to announce that the Ocean Yearbook is part of a new Research4Life program launched in March 2018, providing online access to academic legal content in developing economy countries. Researchers, librarians, policy-makers, judges and legal experts from more than 115 low- and middle-income countries will receive free or low-cost online access to law and law-related academic and professional peer-reviewed content through their institutions. Access is provided by a new program, Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI), a multi-stakeholder initiative of the Research4Life partnership. Eligibility access to Research4Life. How to Register.