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Illustrating Byzantine Law through the Sources
This is the first book in English providing a wide range of Byzantine legal sources. In six chapters, this book explains and illustrates Byzantine law through a selection of fundamental Byzantine legal sources, beginning with the sources before the time of Justinian, and extending up to AD 1453.
For all sources English translations are provided next to the original Greek (and Latin) text. In some cases, tables or other features are included that help further elucidate the source and illustrate its nature. The volume offers a clear yet detailed primer to Byzantine law, its sources, and its significance.
The Legal History Library is a peer-reviewed book series on the history of law in the broadest sense. The approach is preferably comparative in nature, both vertically and horizontally, although studies that approach the subject matter from a different perspective are not automatically excluded. The aim of the Library is to study the historical development of particular areas of law and to explain existing differences and similarities arising in other systems where such comparison is possible. An additional aim is to contribute to a mutual understanding of different approaches to similar problems within the various legal systems. In this way, the Library provides a forum for works related to the growing need for a ius commune in today’s globalising world and provides the necessary historical information for those working in the field of harmonisation projects throughout the world.

The Library not only welcomes dogmatical studies but also offers a forum for interdisciplinary volumes that incorporate law and legal history as their main theme. The editors seek novel, path-breaking, and innovative works that reflect the highest standards of academic writing regardless of the methodologies or approaches employed in any particular volume. Such works are often scholarly monographs, but collected works of previously unpublished contributions forming a cohesive and significant contribution to a particular field of legal history are also welcomed by the editors. There is no restriction in terms of topic, chronology, or geography with the exception of works on the history of international law and on medieval law which should be submitted directly to the Library’s subseries Studies in the History of International Law or Medieval Law and Its Practice.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the series editors Remco van Rhee, Dirk Heirbaut, and M.C. Mirow or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

The series includes the subseries Studies in the History of International Law and Studies in the History of Private Law.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the
Studies in the History of International Law is a peer-reviewed book series that publishes books on the history of international law in the broadest possible sense, without any restrictions in terms of geography or chronology. The series includes studies on the law governing relations between independent body politics, from whatever denomination or civilization. It does not reduce the field to the study of the antecedents, the emergence and evolution of international law as it was formed from the Late Middle Ages onwards in Western Europe.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor Randall Lesaffer or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

This is a subseries of the Legal History Library.
Charlene M. Eska presents in this book a critical edition and translation of a newly discovered early Irish legal text on lost and stolen property, Aidbred. Although the Old Irish text itself is fragmentary, the copious accompanying commentaries provide a wealth of legal, historical, and linguistic information, thus presenting us with a complete picture of the legal procedures involved in reclaiming missing property.
This book also includes editions of two other texts concerning property found on land, Heptad 64, and at sea, Muirbretha. The three texts edited together provide a complete picture of this aspect of the early Irish legal system.
Volume Editor: P. Sean Morris
What was the state of the law and how states managed to fulfil their international legal obligations under the law of nations with respect to intellectual property protection? 13 contributors show how the transition of intellectual property from private rights holders and their non-state patrons evolves into state lawmaking. The book presents these transitions through international legal perspectives and the history of intellectual property rights in late modern societies in Europe, the United States, Asia and Colonial States in Africa.

Contributors are: Daniel Acquah, Ainee Adam, Louise Duncan, Johanna Gibson, Philip Johnson, Jyh-An Lee, Yangzi Li, P. Sean, Morris, Peter Munkacsi, Zvi Rosen, Devanshi Saxena, Johannes Thumfart, and Esther van Zimmeren.
Editor / Translator: Howell A. Lloyd
Written c. 1567 (though unpublished until 1603), this is the work of an extraordinary scholar, a radical and polemicist, rival of many of the leading intellectual and political figures of his day. According to François Hotman’s distinguished biographer Donald Kelley the Antitribonian ‘is, or should be, a landmark in the history of social and historical thought’. It is also a landmark in the history of legal thought. The present edition is the first to evaluate Hotman’s text in the context of the history of Roman law from the time of the sixth-century Byzantine Emperor Justinian I to the Germany of the Enlightenment.
The Monetary Logic of Early Medieval Conflict Resolution
Volume Editors: Lukas Bothe, Stefan Esders, and Han Nijdam
This volume offers the first comprehensive account of the monetary logic that guided the payment of wergild and blood money in early medieval conflict resolution. In the early middle ages, wergild played multiple roles: it was used to measure a person’s status, to prevent and end conflicts, and to negotiate between an individual and the agents of statehood. This collection of interlocking essays by historians, philologists and jurists represents a major contribution to the study of law and society in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages.

Contributors are Lukas Bothe, Warren Brown, Stefan Esders, Wolfgang Haubrichs, Paul Hyams, Tom Lambert, Ralph W. Mathisen, Rob Meens, Han Nijdam, Lisi Oliver, Harald Siems, Karl Ubl, and Helle Vogt.

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