Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 457 items for :

  • Critical Social Sciences x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
The Art of the Creative Commons is a book about peer-to-peer production, providing a unique model of commons from the creative industries. The book expands the knowledge about the role in which an alternative framework of copyright protection (Creative Commons) regulates and establishes norms and conventions within the commons. The book gives insight into a vibrant community that fosters creative projects and a variety of works, from elementary school plays to exhibitions in the Smithsonian or multimillion-dollar Hollywood films.

Taking up the perspective of the creative workforce involved in production and collaboration permits understanding the rules of production that follow an alternative model of production. By analyzing issues of media production, this book engages with current scholarship on critical management, political economy and cultural studies.
This volume addresses pertinent questions related to cross-border labor migration and puts forward a “labor market” perspective that goes beyond the national frame of reference prevailing in most of the extant labor market scholarship. In four sections, the volume pulls together a number of key threads: How can we theoretically grasp “global labor markets?” What does existing empirical research reveal about the current state of affairs and the historical development of “global labor markets”, provided that they can even be regarded as “global?” How is the emergence of border-crossing labor markets influenced by existing institutions, international intermediaries and social networks? The editors have crafted a coherent volume that enriches our understanding of both globalization and labor markets.

Contributors include: Patrik Aspers, Peter-Paul Bänziger, Martin Bühler, Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick, Richard Hyman, Sven Kesselring, Eleonore Kofman, Ursula Mense-Petermann, Sigrid Quack, Alexandra Scheele, Helen Schwenken, Karen Shire, Marcel van der Linden, Thomas Welskopp, Tobias Werron, and Anna Zaharieva.
Translator: John Hocking
Hiromatsu argues that the change from Hegel’s theory of self-alienation to the concept of reification is crucial in establishing a new relational worldview which is still relevant today. Amongst other topics, his discussion of the understanding of society sees such as a relational dynamic wherein the individual is constantly composed and composing in relation to others, including nature. This understanding is, he argues, the “single science of history” of Marx and Engels. It overcomes the hypostasizing subject - object relation still prevalent today.

Originally published in Japanese as Busshōkaron no kōzu by Iwanami Shoten, Publishers, Tokyo, 1983, 1994. © By Kuniko Hiromatsu.
Series Editors: Evgeni Pavlov and David Rowley
The Historical Materialism Book Series at Brill has initiated a project to publish ten volumes of English translations of the major theoretical and polemical works of the Russian Social-Democrat, Alexander Bogdanov (Alexander A. Malinovsky, 1873-1928) in the new subseries Bogdanov Library.

Alexander Bogdanov was a co-founder, with Lenin of the Bolshevik fraction of the Russian Social-Democratic Labour Party, and he played a leadership role in the RSDLP during the Revolution of 1905. After the revolution, he split with Lenin over both theoretical and practical issues, and his polemics with Lenin provide a fascinating glimpse into Russian Social Democracy between the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917. Bogdanov played no political role in the October Revolution, but afterwards he was an influential figure in Soviet culture. He founded and led the “Proletarian Culture” movement from 1918-20; he helped found and was a member of the Socialist (later Communist) Academy; he was a faculty member in Moscow State University’s Institute of Scientific Philosophy; and he was the director of Russia’s first institute for blood transfusion in the last two years of his life.
Bogdanov was first and foremost a historical materialist. His life project was to express the fundamental principles of historical materialism in what he felt was the most up-to-date scientific terms. He believed that the task of philosophy was not to contemplate the world, but to change it. He believed that the motive force of historical evolution originated in labour. He looked forward to a collectivist society and a culture created by the working class. Early in his writing career, he believed that the empiricist philosophy of Ernst Mach and Richard Avenarius—reinterpreted from the standpoint of labour collectivism—best served as the foundation of a materialist view of the world. Later, as his political activity subsided, he attempted to develop a scientific approach toward understanding the nature of future collectivist society and the necessary cultural, social, economic and political changes involved in any attempt to bring about such a society. His contribution to the analysis of culture, long before ‘cultural studies’ came into existence, was enormous and his influence in articulating the new approach of ‘ideological science’ was significant. Finally, Bogdanov’s idea of tektology, later discovered in the theory of systems, was a bold attempt to theorize organizational structures as such, ultimately resulting in the theorization of socialism as the ultimate goal of human collective existence.

The projected volumes are as follows:
Volume 1: Essays in Social Psychology (1901-1906)
This is a collection of essays originally published in 1904 and revised and enlarged in 1906. Among the key ideas that Bogdanov develops is the principle of ‘socio-morphism’ – that forms of thought are modelled on forms of labour and economic relationships. He also carries on polemics with other philosophical trends.
Volume 2: Empiriomonism
This volume contains all three volumes of Bogdanov’s Empiriomonism, a collection of essays which express his first fully developed reformulation of historical materialism on the basis of Richard Avenarius’s Empirio-criticism.
Volume 3: Political Writings (1904 to 1928)
This volume will include some of Bogdanov’s general writings on liberalism and Menshevism, but will be primarily devoted to tracing the divergence between Lenin and Bogdanov which culminated in the formation of the Vpered group of the RSDLP which contested Lenin’s claim to be the standard bearer of true Bolshevism. Materials will include Bogdanov’s analysis of the split within Bolshevism; his writings on the First World War (where he provided the first definition of “War Communism”); his commentaries on the February Revolution and on Lenin’s seizure of power and his interpretation of social and political developments after October 1917, notably his writings on the emergence in Soviet Russia of a “new class”.
Volume 4: The Fall of Great Fetishism: The Contemporary Crisis of Ideology
This volume will provide the philosophical aspect of Bogdanov’s break with Lenin. It will contain The Adventures of a Certain Philosophical School, Fall of the Great Fetishism (which includes Bogdanov’s response to Lenin’sMaterialism and Empiriocriticism), and a selection of shorter essays on philosophy.
Volume 5: The Cultural Tasks of Our Time: Essays on Proletarian Culture
Bogdanov’s key writings on Proletarian Culture, including The Cultural Tasks of Our Time, selections from On Proletarian Culture, 1904-1924, and various articles from the journal Proletarian Culture and elsewhere.
Volume 6: The Science of Social Consciousness
The basis of this volume will be the 1914 short book called The Science of Social Consciousness: A Short Course of Ideological Science in Questions and Answers that lays the foundation for Bogdanov’s theory of ideology (or ‘spiritual culture’). This will be a companion volume to the volume on ‘cultural tasks’.
Volume 7: The Tenth Anniversary of Excommunication from Marxism: Autobiographical Writings
This volume will include: Selections from The Tenth Anniversary of Excommunication from Marxism (1914), selections from Bogdanov’s unpublished autobiographical manuscripts, from his biographical observations concerning other revolutionary figures, and from unpublished letters and communications.
Volume 8: Philosophy of Living Experience: Popular Outlines
The Philosophy of Living Experience. Materialism, Empiriocriticism, Dialectical Materialism, Empiriomonism, the Science of the Future. Popular Outlines, (1913; 1923) with the appendix to the 1923 edition, ‘From Religious to Scientific Monism’. This is Bogdanov’s summative statement of his philosophy that anticipates his ultimate philosophical achievement: universal organisational science.
Volume 9: Tektology: Universal Organisational Science
This will contain all three parts of Tektologiia: Vseobshchaia organizatsionnaia nauka, a pioneering work in systems theory, in which Bogdanov proposed that all physical, biological, and human sciences could be unified by treating them as systems of relationships and by seeking the organisational principles that underlie all such systems.
Volume 10: Writings on Socialism
This volume will contain a variety of articles and books on socialism and political economy, including ‘On Socialism’, New World, ‘Socialism in the Present’, Problems of Socialism, The Socialism of Science: The Scientific Tasks of the Proletariat, selections from A Short Course of Economic Science, and economic essays from the 1920s.

For more information on the Bogdanov Library see also the Alexander Bogdanov Library webpage created by the subseries editors.
Series Editor: R.A. Dello Buono
The peer-reviewed book series Critical Global Studies presents monographs and anthologies that systematically explore the exploding contradictions in the global order as well as emerging alternatives that challenge neoliberal capitalist development. We seek critical and emancipatory insights of scholars and movement activists from a variety of disciplines around the globe.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to either the series editor R.A. Dello Buono or the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

Critical Global Studies has an independent editorial board that works together with the team of Studies in Critical Social Sciences, in which series it is included.
Series Editors: Tyrus Miller and Erik M. Bachmann
The image of György Lukács’s work, especially in the English-speaking world, has been limited by the absence of translations of some of the most significant writing. The Lukács Library seeks to fill out the picture of Lukács’s massively productive and diverse writing and to correct the reception of Lukács through the nearly exclusive emphasis of Western Marxism and the New Left on Lukács’s early work. In particular, the Lukács Library translations will offer a much richer view of Lukács’s long-evolving engagement with the changing contexts of modern European culture over the eight decades of his life, with the shifts in the socialist and communist movement, and with the dominant and emerging philosophical paradigms of the twentieth century. The Lukács Library’s major expansion of the corpus of English-language translations of Lukács’s writings will especially train new attention on writings that span Lukács’s advocacy of an anti-fascist cultural front policy, a new democratic popular front following the fall of fascism, and an anti-Stalinist socialist democracy in a global environment of coexistence following the 20th Congress in 1956 in which Khrushschev initiated the post-Stalin thaw. In addition, it will provide new material for understanding the genesis of the major, influential, and much-discussed works that have previously appeared in English translations.
In Lost-Time Injury Rates Rodrigo Finkelstein examines the information-intensive operations of recording and processing work-related accidents, diseases and fatalities carried out by Workers’ Compensation Systems. Situated within the field of political economy of information, this critique contributes to the understanding of how injury rates service a specific sector of the economy by constructing lost labour power for sale.
The central argument of this critique can be stated as follows: grounded in the capitalist mode of production, injury rates constitute a historical social relation that, by taking the semblance of inductive indicators, conceal specific capitalist relations that bring about the exchange and distribution of lost labour power among capitalists and wage labourers.
Series Editor: Warren S. Goldstein
Studies in Critical Research on Religion provides a venue for scholars engaged in critical research on religion. This includes studies contributing to our understanding of how religious institutions and thought may simultaneously serve as a source of domination and progressive social change. We seek to analyze the historical and economic conditions giving rise to religious systems while recognizing that religious ideas can be motivational and therefore dialectically related to material conditions. We are interested in the role that religion plays within social and political conflicts. A critical perspective recognizes that its own intellectual heritage lies within the confluence of various religious, political, and philosophical traditions. It does not reject this heritage but critically self-reflects on its relationship to it. This peer-reviewed book series invites proposals for and submissions of monographs and edited volumes from scholars across all academic disciplines. Works can use a wide range of methodologies, including quantitative, qualitative, and historical. While encouraging works to be theoretical driven by a critical perspective, it is also interested in empirical research which is theoretically guided.

Published in association with the Center for Critical Research on Religion.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/ or full manuscripts to Warren S. Goldstein

Authors will find the proposal guidelines on the Critical Theory of Religion book series web page.

Studies in Critical Research on Religion was initially published as a subseries of Studies in Critical Social Sciences. Starting with Vol. 4, Studies in Critical Research on Religion is published as a separate series.
Author: Jan Rehmann
Translators: Kolja Swingle and Larry Swingle
It is often asserted that postmodernism emerged from 'leftist' Nietzsche-interpretations, but it is rarely explored. This book investigates how Deleuze and Foucault read Nietzsche and apply a hermeneutics of innocence to his philosophy that erases the elitist, anti-democratic, and anti-socialist dimensions. This misreading also affects their own theory and impairs the claim to develop a radical critique. The late Foucault’s turn to self-care techniques merges a neo-Nietzschean approach with the ideologies of neoliberalism. Rehmann’s critique is not directed against the endeavor to take suggestions from some of Nietzsche’s astute intuitions, but rather against the conformism to use him as a symbolic capital without revealing his hierarchical obsession.

This book is an updated and extended version of Postmoderner Links-Nietzscheanismus: Deleuze & Foucault. Eine Dekonstruktion, originally published in German by Argument Verlag GmbH, 2004, 978-3-88619-298-4.