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Volume Editors: Raju J. Das and Deepak K. Mishra
Much ink has been spilled on poverty measurements and trends, at the expense of revealing causality. Assembling multi-disciplinary and international contributions, this book shows that a causal understanding of poverty in rich and poor countries is essential. That understanding must be based on a critical interrogation of the wider social relations which set up the mechanisms producing poverty as an outcome. Processes that widen/strengthen crisis-ridden market relations, that increase income/wealth inequality, and that ‘enhance’ the policy-biases of nation-states and international institutions toward the affluent-propertied strata cause global poverty and undermine poor people’s political power. The processes concentrating wealth-creation are poverty-causing processes. Through theoretical and empirical analyses this volume offers important insights and political prescriptions to address global poverty.

Contributors are:Raju J. Das, Deepak K. Mishra, Steven Pressman, Michael Roberts, Jamie Gough, Aram Eisenschitz, Anjan Chakravarty, Mizhar Mikati, Marcelo Milan, Tarique Niazi, John Marangos, Eirini Triarchi, Themis Anthrakidis, Macayla Kisten and Brij Maharaj, David Michael M. San Juan, and Thaddeus Hwong.
The 14th thematic volume of International Development Policy provides perspectives through case studies from the global Souths focusing on the challenges and opportunities of governing migration on the subnational, national, regional and international levels. Bringing together some thirty authors from Africa, Latin America and Asia, the book explores existing and new policies and frameworks in terms of their successes and best practices, and looks at them through the lens of additional challenges, such as those brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the rise of nationalisms and an increase in xenophobia. The chapters also take the ‘5 Ps’ approach to sustainable development (people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships) and assess how migration policies serve sustainable development in a rapidly evolving context.
What explains neo-nationalism – the surge of populist nationalism in the contemporary phase of globalized development? Drawing on Karl Polanyi’s study of the “great transformation,” Oleksandr Svitych argues that neo-nationalism is a societal protective reaction against the pro-market structural changes in the political economies of nation-states – conceptualized as the capital-state transformation. He shows that there is an inextricable link between free market reforms, declining state legitimacy, and identity-based mobilization. To test the book’s argument, Svitych adopts a mixed methods approach of quantitative statistical analysis and qualitative case studies. First, he examines the relationship between the capital-state and neo-nationalism by using a time-series cross-sectional analysis of thirty-five member-states of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Estimates suggest that the capital-state – measured through the composite capital-state index – is a significant and powerful predictor of the neo-nationalist vote. Second, through four case studies (Australia, France, Hungary, and South Korea) the mechanisms that link macro-economic transformations to neo-nationalist vote or lack thereof are explored. Svitych finds that discontented voters gravitate toward these political forces and embrace identity-based solutions – often in exclusivist and scapegoating forms – to harness their anxieties and insecurities triggered by the capital-state restructuring. Both methods demonstrate that populist nationalism of both the Left and the Right has emerged to compensate for the real and perceived inability of the state to shield citizens from the corrosive effects of market fundamentalism. The book contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of the inter-related nature of state, capital, and identity politicization through a broader social theoretical perspective.
State and Individual in Inner City Renewal and Urban Social Movement
Author: Yunqing SHI
In Becoming Citizens in China, Shi Yunqing describes the two interlinked histories that have made China’s urban and economic miracle: the unfolding process of inner city renewal and the production of citizens shaped by the collective rights defence actions in response to demolition and resettlement projects. Shi reveals a complex problematic tension between the state and the individual during China's social transition. This book is rigorously researched and draws on a rich body of materials. In this approach to State-Individual relationship, Shi Yunqing convincingly shows how citizens are produced in urban social movements against the backdrop of differences between Chinese and Western development histories. The production of citizens in “Chinese-style” produces insightful “local knowledge” and contributes to a new global sociology in general and the Post-Western sociology in particular.

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在《再造城民》这本书中,施芸卿讲述了造就中国城市和经济奇迹的两段互为表里的历史:旧城的再造与公民的生产。从国家和个人之间的相互形塑出发,她展现了中国社会转型的独特逻辑。本书有着极其详实的法律、政策文本和田野材料,以“国家—个人”关系为研究路径,施芸卿令人信服地解释了在与西方发展历史不同的中国背景下,公民如何从都市社会运动中产生。“中国式”的公民生产提供了富于洞见的本土知识,为新的全球社会学,尤其是后西方社会学研究做出了贡献。

Volume Editor: Marzena Żakowska
The book offers a comprehensive overview of social security in the Balkan states. Social security is presented from a broad perspective as a mechanism that addresses human needs, provides protection against social risks, reduces social tensions and secures peace. Various sectors of social policy, pension systems, health care systems, disability insurance, labor policy as well as social risks, such as poverty and unemployment have been analyzed from historical, economic, political, sociological and security perspective. The book also offers recommendations for improving the level of social security in the region.

Contributors are: Dritero Arifi, Ngadhnjim Brovina, Pëllumb Çollaku, Dorota Domalewska, Besnik Fetahu, Remzije Istrefi, Maja Jandrić, Gordana Matković, Ruzhdi Morina, Artan Mustafa, Katarina Stanić, and Marzena Żakowska.
Volume Editor: Pegah Mossleh
This book is the outcome of one of the most extensive international academic projects on the COVID-19 pandemic in the field of humanities and social sciences. It includes the reflections of scholars from 25 universities, in Europe, Asia, Canada, Australia, the US, and the UK, on 60 important philosophical and political questions. This paradigmatic volume is unique in the history of the humanities and social sciences in dealing with pandemics and should be considered as a starting point for more coherent and synergistic academic cooperation in preparation for similar future phenomena.
“We have to abandon liberal methods and principles of organizing a society. The new state that we are building is an illiberal state, a non-liberal state”, Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban famously said in 2014, exemplifying a broader trend taking place in Central Europe. Why would the countries that were praised as democratization and Europeanization success stories take an illiberal turn? This volume explores changing values and attitudes to explain events that took place in the aftermath of the financial and migration crisis in six Central European countries: Croatia, Czechia, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia.