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Postcolonial Literatures of Climate Change investigates the evolving nature of postcolonial literary criticism in response to global, regional, and local environmental transformations brought about by climate change. It builds upon, and extends, previous studies in postcolonial ecocriticism to demonstrate how the growing awareness of human-caused global warming has begun to permeate literary consciousness, praxis and analysis. The breadth of the volume’s coverage – the diversity of its focal locations, cultures, genres and texts – serves as a salient reminder that, while climate change is global, its impacts vary, effecting peoples from place to place unequally, and often in accordance with their particular historical experience of colonialism and neo-colonialism, as well as their ongoing marginalisations.

“Demonstrating the urgency of invoking novel epistemological approaches combining the scientific and the imaginative, this book is a “must read” for those concerned about the present and potential impacts of climate change on formerly colonised areas of the world. The comprehensive and illuminating Introduction offers a crucial history and current state of postcolonial ecocriticism as it has been and is addressing climate crises.”
- Helen Tiffin, University of Wollongong

“The broad focus on the polar regions, the Pacific and the Caribbean – with added essays on environmental justice/activism in India and Egypt – opens up rich terrain for examination under the rubric of postcolonial and ecocritical analysis, not only expanding recent studies in this field but also enabling new comparisons and conceptual linkages.” - Helen Gilbert, Royal Holloway, University of London

“The subject is topical and vital and will become even more so as the problem of how to reconcile the demands of climate change with the effects on regions and individual nations already damaged by the economic effects of colonisation and the subsequent inequalities resulting from neo-colonialism continues to grow.” - Gareth Griffiths, Em. Prof. University of Western Australia

Globalization is a defining characteristic of our contemporary world, with a reach and impact affecting all nations and peoples. Philosophical Aspects of Globalization is a collection of essays by leading contemporary Russian philosophers, scholars, and scientists concerned with addressing pressing issues of globalization from a philosophical point of view. The thirty-four authors who have contributed to this book represent a range of approaches and subfields of Global Studies in Russia, including topics such as theory of globalization, globalization and the environment, history and geopolitics, and globalization in cultural context. When compiled together in a single collection of essays, their work offers the English-speaking reader a comprehensive picture of new directions in Russian Global Studies in the twenty-first century, as well as demonstrates the importance of questions of globalization for philosophical inquiry in Russia today.
Volume Editor: Marzena Żakowska
The book offers a comprehensive overview of social security in the Balkan states. Social security is presented from a broad perspective as a mechanism that addresses human needs, provides protection against social risks, reduces social tensions and secures peace. Various sectors of social policy, pension systems, health care systems, disability insurance, labor policy as well as social risks, such as poverty and unemployment have been analyzed from historical, economic, political, sociological and security perspective. The book also offers recommendations for improving the level of social security in the region.

Contributors are: Dritero Arifi, Ngadhnjim Brovina, Pëllumb Çollaku, Dorota Domalewska, Besnik Fetahu, Remzije Istrefi, Maja Jandrić, Gordana Matković, Ruzhdi Morina, Artan Mustafa, Katarina Stanić, and Marzena Żakowska.
Maritime spaces are socially constructed by humans and refer to seas and islands, coasts, port cities and villages, as well as ships and other human-made marine structures. Social interaction with marine environments and living beings, e.g. in a symbolic, cultural or economic manner, has led to the emergence of spatial structures which affect the knowledge, beliefs, meanings and obstinately patterns. Those structures shape mutual expectations of human beings and form the perception, imagination, or memory of inhabitants of maritime spaces. They enable or restrict human action, construct people’s everyday life, their norms and values, and are changeable.

Contributors include: Jan Asmussen, Robert Bartłomiejski, Benjamin Bowles, Isabel Duarte, Eduardo Sarmento Ferreira, Rita Grácio, Marie C. Grasmeier, Karolina Izdebska, Seung Kuk Kim, Arkadiusz Kołodziej, Agnieszka Kołodziej-Durnaś, Maciej Kowalewski, Urszula Kozłowska, Ulrike Kronfeld-Goharani, Rute Muchacho, Giacomo Orsini, Włodzimierz Karol Pessel, Célia Quico, Harini Sivalingam, Joana Sousa, Frank Sowa, Nuno Cintra Torres, and Günter Warsewa.
Series Editor: Laurence Roulleau-Berger
Reflection in the social sciences is linked to the development of the Western society which saw its birth. The social sciences and humanities have developed very considerably in the last decades in different Asian countries, where both theoretical approaches and theoretical methodologies have been constantly changing. As a result of the circulation and globalisation of knowledge, new centres and new peripheral areas have been formed and new hierarchies have quietly emerged, giving rise in turn to new competitive environments in which innovative knowledge is being produced. The centres in which knowledge in the social sciences and humanities is produced have moved towards Asia. We are entering a new phase of global intellectual life after Western hegemony. The aim of this series is to produce a post-Western space in which knowledge is produced that is both specific and shared and in which theories and methodologies are gathered together on the basis of very different histories and traditions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Submissions of an interdisciplinary nature are strongly encouraged.
Doing Youth Studies in Spain and Latin America
Youth studies in Latin America and Spain face numerous challenges. This book delves into youth experiences in the 21st century, shaped by complex and pressing issues: the surge of youth cultures and groups, visual images of youth throughout time, and fragmented youth experiences in radically unequal societies. It analyzes young people as precarious natives in global capitalism and labor uncertainty, juvenicide, feminist discourse, social networks, intimacy and sexual affection among young people in a context of growing claims of gender equality. Also included are rural and indigenous youth as political actors, the actions of young political activists within government administrations, the experience of youth migration and empowerment, and young people dealing with the digital world. How have youth studies approached these issues in Latin America and Spain? Which were the main developments and transformations in this research field over the past years? Where is it heading?

Contributors are: Jorge Benedicto, Maritza Urteaga, Dolores Rocca, José Antonio Pérez Islas, Juan Carlos Revilla, Mariano Urraco, Almudena Moreno, Óscar Aguilera, Marcela Saá, Rafael Merino, Ana Miranda, Carles Feixa, Gonzalo Saraví, Antonio Santos-Ortega, David Muñoz-Rodríguez, Arantxa Grau-Muñoz, José Manuel Valenzuela, Silvia Elizalde, Mónica Figueras, Mittzy Arciniega, Nele Hansen, Tanja Strecker, Elisa G. de Castro, Melina Vázquez, René Unda, Daniel Llanos, Sonia Páez de la Torre, Pere Soler, Daniel Calderón, and Stribor Kuric.
Series Editor: R.A. Dello Buono
The peer-reviewed book series Critical Global Studies presents monographs and anthologies that systematically explore the exploding contradictions in the global order as well as emerging alternatives that challenge neoliberal capitalist development. We seek critical and emancipatory insights of scholars and movement activists from a variety of disciplines around the globe.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to either the series editor R.A. Dello Buono or the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

Critical Global Studies has an independent editorial board that works together with the team of Studies in Critical Social Sciences, in which series it is included.
International Studies in Maritime Sociology disseminates peer-reviewed research on maritime topics including but not limited to maritime labor, the culture of maritime spaces, marine environmental issues and society, the sociology of the use of marine resources (e.g., fisheries and extractive industries), maritime migration routes, maritime policies, and marine and maritime tourism. The volumes in the International Studies in Maritime Sociology series assemble perspectives from various social science disciplines on the aforementioned topics in order to facilitate an interdisciplinary understanding of the relationship between the sea and society.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.

Co-constructing NGO Presence in Rural Malawi