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Abstract

Joy and gratitude are two of the deepest touch points of human existence. Joy is a multi-faceted concept that is best thought of as an emotion-virtue composed of delight in that which is ultimately good. Gratitude is an affirmation of the good and a recognition of where that good is sourced. As self-transcendent, positive emotion dispositions at the heart of many religious and spiritual traditions, these qualities are key components of the flourishing life. Gratitude been object of serious study across many traditions for many centuries; joy has only recently become the focus of investigations in theology and in the human sciences. We explore the connection between the two, and with a special focus on youth thriving, we consider how gratitude practices can potentiate joy.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

In this article, the authors set forward a theory of joy built upon adolescent development and describe how anxiety sometimes interferes. They elaborate why adolescence is a time of joy and the type of future-oriented adolescent imagination that fosters joy. Describing adolescent development from neurological, biological, social, sexual orientation, racial identity, and stages of faith perspectives, they show how joy and development are linked in adolescent flourishing. After defining anxiety, showing its prevalence, and distinguishing it from worry they indicate how the existential concerns of anxiety interferes with joy and how mentorship can help. Exploring pertinent Scriptures, they examine some ameliorative effects against anxiety through attachment based play that challenges a competitive culture and mentorship that evokes already-emergent strengths.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
Authors: Kate Ott and Lorien Carter

Abstract

Sexuality and relationships are a major aspect of teen development. Youth Ministry programs that embrace relational joy and embodied flourishing promote healthy, holistic sexuality for the teens they serve. Yet, many youth ministry programs treat sexuality as a risk (or sin) to be reduced or about which to remain completely silent. Sexuality is part of our created goodness that youth need help to understand and embrace. Faith leaders can influence how teens understand their sexuality and relationships, either as a positive dimension of joy and flourishing or as an inhibitor to health and thriving. In addition to this theological conversation, this article describes increased risks to adolescents who experience high levels of disapproval from families and faith leaders with regards to their sexuality and suggests specific ways to integrate healthy and holistic approaches to faith-based sexuality education that cultivates joy and flourishing related to teen sexuality and relationships.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

This article is an invitation to Christian youth & young adult educators and ministers to be more understanding of queer theology and to discern its place within ministry to and for young people. The article examines the term “queer,” queer theology, and the placement of queer theology in youth & young adult ministry. Finally the article provides queer pastoral and pedagogical strategies and methods for integration into youth and young adult ministry.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

The role and function of children’s ministry during the first six months of the Covid-19 pandemic is explored, including a comparison of observations from four different contexts: Norway, South Africa, The Netherlands, The United Kingdom. Theological reflection examines the emerging ecclesiologies, form and adaptation of sacramental practices and pastoral care of families during this time of crisis. This investigation acknowledges awareness that there were significant restrictions and consequent challenges facing churches during this time, causing implications on children’s ministry that were unprecedented and frustrating for the Church on a global scale. Observations and recommendations are presented to aid churches globally in ensuring that children’s ministry during such times of crisis is child-centred, values the child as part of the body of Christ, fosters intergenerational role modelling and solidarity, and helps rather than hinders children on their spiritual journey.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
30 Years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in Action towards Sustainability
This book investigates and uncover paradoxes and ambivalences that are actualised when seeking to make the right choices in the best interests of the child. The 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established a milestone for the 20th century. Many of these ideas still stand, but time calls for new reflections, empirical descriptions and knowledge as provided in this book.

Special attention is directed to the conceptualisation of children and childhood cultures, the missing voices of infants and fragile children, as well as transformations during times of globalisation and change. All chapters contribute to understand and discuss aspects of societal demands and cultural conditions for modern-day children age 0–18, accompanied by pointers to their future.

Contributors are: Eli Kristin Aadland, Wenche Bjorbækmo, Jorunn Spord Borgen, Gunn Helene Engelsrud, Kristin Vindhol Evensen, Eldbjørg Fossgard, Liv Torunn Grindheim, Asle Holthe, Liisa Karlsson, Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager, Jonatan Leer, Ida Marie Lyså, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Czarecah Tuppil Oropilla, Susanne Højlund Pedersen, Anja Maria Pesch, Karen Klitgaard Povlsen, Gro Rugseth, Pauline von Bonsdorff, Hege Wergedahl and Susanne C. Ylönen.
Can one speak dispassionately today about Pierre Bourdieu? The extraordinary success of his work and its agonistic dimension makes things quite difficult. Jean-Louis Fabiani’s book is an attempt to apply Bourdieu’s analytical tools to his own work as he invited us in his reflexive sociology. Testing their limitations and their potential ambiguity allows the author to shed new light on the social genesis of his main concepts (field, habitus and capital) and on the complex relationship between science and politics. While the sociologist’s systemic ambition is never taken for granted, it remains possible to reveal its hidden grandeur.

Professor Jean-Louis Fabiani is the winner of the 2020 CEU Award for Outstanding Research
[Click here to read the interview with Professor Jean-Louis Fabiani on the occasion of receiving the award]
Author: Sylvie Octobre
Fake, mods, gaming, remix... these terms refer to modes of access, linked to digital convergence, but above all to capacities for action on cultural content, as well as on creative capacities, made possible thanks to ICTs. The media cultures of the audiovisual era are thus succeeded by the techno cultures of the digital era, in which the smartphone is becoming the first cultural terminal. These changes have a profound influence on the ways in which young people build their lives, but also on social ties. What do fansubbing and media activism have in common? What education do these changes require? These are some of the questions Youth Technoculture: From Aesthetics to Politics tries to answer.

Abstract

With the rise of right-wing populist ideologies and ensuing social polarization, political violence has become more widespread. Between 2017 and 2019, far-right extremists and anti-fascists engaged in more than twenty violent protest clashes in Portland, Oregon, USA. Through a protest event analysis of those clashes supplemented with a case study of the protest wave, this paper explores how the mechanisms of radicalization and de-radicalization operate when two violent protest movements collide and interact with state security forces. The three-way interaction among a movement, counter-movement, and the police can produce unanticipated outcomes. For example, rather than de-escalating the situation, police underbidding resulted in an increase in violence between the two movements. Understanding how the mechanisms of radicalization and de-radicalization function in a movement/counter-movement protest cycle can provide insight into the ways in which a movement’s strategy and their adversaries’ responses to it can increase or decrease levels of violence.

In: Youth and Globalization

Abstract

Europe is facing a new wave of antisemitism, which has grown in recent years. In 2019, the number of reported antisemitic crimes has increased in Germany. On the one hand, Muslim immigrants are suspected of so-called “imported Antisemitism”. On the other hand, right-wing extremism still appears to be the main cause of most antisemitic crimes. Moreover, antisemitism may also be rooted in the left-wing spectrum hiding behind the criticism of Israel and its policies. To analyze the connections of antisemitic attitudes, data from a school survey of 6,715 ninth-graders are used. The results indicate a strong connection between right-wing attitudes and antisemitism as well as left-wing and Islamist attitudes and antisemitism. Higher values of antisemitism are also found among Muslims, but the main predictor of antisemitic attitudes is by far right-wing attitudes.

In: Youth and Globalization