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Editor: Marion Romberg
The book analyzes the evolving interaction between court and media from an understudied perspective. Eight case studies focus on different European Empress consorts and Queen regnants from the 17th to the 20th century, using a unique, comparative, cross-media, and crossperiod approach. The volume raises a multitude of issues, ranging from how dynastic women achieved public prominence through their portraits; how their faces and bodies were moulded and rearticulated to fit varying expectations in the courtly public sphere; and the degree to which they, as female subjects, engaged with or had agency within the processes of production and reception. In particular, two types of female rulership and their relationship to diverse media are contrasted, and lesser-known and under-researched dynastic women are spotlighted.

Contributors include: Christine Engelke, Anna Fabiankowitsch, Inga Lena Ångström Grandien, Titia Hensel, Andrea Mayr, Alison McQueen, Marion Romberg, and Alison Rowley.
Translator: Katharina Tobisch
The sociology of sport is a relatively new scientific discipline, which has spread rapidly and developed in different directions across the world. It investigates social behavior, social processes, and social structures in sport, as well as the relationship between sport and society. The book Introduction to the Sociology of Sport aims to give its readers a comprehensive overview of this fascinating topic. For this purpose, it shows the interrelations between sport and identity, social class, gender, socialization, social groups, (mass) communication, the economy, and politics. In addition, the book introduces a new, innovative theory that helps readers understand the social specificity and worldwide popularity of sport.
Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
The collapse of the Soviet Union brought about the sudden expansion of the ‘developing world’, as the populations of many of the former Soviet republics were abruptly plunged into poverty and international development agencies rushed to their aid. In this account of development intervention since 1991 in Kyrgyzstan, one of these republics, Joanna Pares Hoare draws on feminist critiques to chart how concepts of gender equality, civil society, and activism came to be instrumentalised in development interventions in the post-Soviet space. Ethnographic data gathered through interviews and observation with employees and volunteers in local NGOs provides further insight into what this has meant for activists in Kyrgyzstan who are striving for progressive social change.
Author: Nancy W. Jabbra
In Women and Gender in a Lebanese Village: Generations of Change, Nancy W. Jabbra addresses change in women's and gender roles in a village in Lebanon's Bekaa valley. Employing ethnographic methods and secondary sources, she explores that change from the post-World War II period to the early twenty-first century. The topics of geography and power, family and kinship, education and work, community solidarity, ritual and symbolism, and consideration of the future comprise the substantive part of her monograph. This work is a much-needed comprehensive treatment of women in a contemporary Arab Christian rural community.
Volume Editors: Rose Ann Torres and Dionisio Nyaga
We live in a society that promotes the universal process of producing knowledge and truth making as fundamental social process. Such promotion of universality seems to subjugate others forms of knowing rendering them invisible, unintelligible, and ineligible and subsequently outside the community of knowing. This has material and symbolic consequences in terms of how research informs policy and subsequent victimization of those who live, and experience subjugation meted by Western truth making universalism. In the words of Foucault, this book is an insurrection of subterranean and clandestine knowledges in ways that provide not just an alternative process of knowledge production but affirms local knowledge as necessary in production of a just society. The book looks at research as a social justice and transformational process that should speak of people’s ways of live without necessarily streamlining them into numbers. The book is a critically reflexive project in terms of returning processes of knowledge production to the local space rather than imagining them as entirely centred in the structure. To imagine this book as reflexive exercise is to break boundaries of knowledges in ways that come to imagine how local performs global in very complicated and complex ways. This book is a resurrection of local knowledges steeped in creative and imaginative reflexive methodologies that come to reorient how we come to know what we know, the values and realities that mark what we know and the how of knowledge production. It centres subjugated voices and knowledges as fundamental in production of knowledge.

Contributors include: Katie Bannon, Elizabeth Charles, Khulood Agha Khan, Dionisio Nyaga, Fritz Pino, and Rose Ann Torres.
The Portrayal of Women in Early Christian Armenian Texts
Author: David Zakarian
The Women, Too, Were Blessed by David Zakarian is the first extensive study of the representation of women in the fifth-century Armenian literature and historiography. It investigates the ways in which the ecclesiastical authorities envisioned the role of women in society after Christianisation and reveals some aspects of women’s lived experience in the patriarchal society of Armenia. The book offers a close scrutiny of all the passages that speak about women examining them within the context of pre-Christian (Zoroastrian) beliefs of the Armenians and the works of Greek and Syriac Church Fathers. The texts invariably evince the authors’ tendency to construct and promote role models of influential, pious Christian women who contributed to the preservation and promulgation of the new religion.
Dorothy Fujita-Rony’s The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History examines the importance of women's memorykeeping for two Toba Batak women whose twentieth-century histories span Indonesia and the United States, H.L.Tobing and Minar T. Rony. This book addresses the meanings of family stories and artifacts within a gendered and interimperial context, and demonstrates how these knowledges can produce alternate cartographies of memory and belonging within the diaspora. It thus explores how women’s memorykeeping forges integrative possibility, not only physically across islands, oceans, and continents, but also temporally, across decades, empires, and generations. Thirty-five years in the making, The Memorykeepers is the first book on Indonesian Americans written within the fields of US history, American Studies, and Asian American Studies.
Domestic Space and Genre in Qing Vernacular Literature