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Globalization is a defining characteristic of our contemporary world, with a reach and impact affecting all nations and peoples. Philosophical Aspects of Globalization is a collection of essays by leading contemporary Russian philosophers, scholars, and scientists concerned with addressing pressing issues of globalization from a philosophical point of view. The thirty-four authors who have contributed to this book represent a range of approaches and subfields of Global Studies in Russia, including topics such as theory of globalization, globalization and the environment, history and geopolitics, and globalization in cultural context. When compiled together in a single collection of essays, their work offers the English-speaking reader a comprehensive picture of new directions in Russian Global Studies in the twenty-first century, as well as demonstrates the importance of questions of globalization for philosophical inquiry in Russia today.
This book series covers the entire African continent on a national scale in order to provide a holistic overview of multilingualism and the language policies. Due to its country-by-country structure all African countries receive the same attention and space. For usability purposes, the countries are grouped in the different regional economic communities (RECs):
- Volume I: SADC
- Volume II: EAC & ECCAS
- Volume III: ECOWAS
- Volume IV: AMU & COMESA
These volumes of the series focus primarily on language-in-education policies (LiEP). The book series aims to describe and analyse the diverse challenges of LiEP for the entire African continent using a standard structure for each chapter to ensure readability. Book chapters will be mainly contributed by authors based in Africa.
Encounters across Arts, Sciences and Humanities
Experimental Practices seeks to develop the status of science, art, and literature as truly experimental practices and forms of knowledge production – each borrowing from the other in order to further its drive to invention and innovation.
In times of environmental, political, and technological transformation and crisis, the urge to forge new alliances between the humanities, arts, and sciences has given rise to disciplinary hybrids, such as the environmental humanities, the medical humanities, artistic research, or the neurohumanities – all of which signal a turn towards ecological, more-than-human and posthumanist approaches in resonance with a broad array of worldly concerns. In this context, Experimental Practices is a platform for experimental forms of research at the intersections of the humanities, sciences, as well as activists outside academia around issues that shape contemporary and future cultures.
Taking “experimentation” as the practice, topic, and aim of the series, the editors welcome monographs or collected volumes around a specific concept or theme that contribute and enact a practice-based as well as theory-driven poetics of knowledge.
The series is committed to continue a fruitful collaboration with the international SLSA (Society for the Study of Literature, Science, and the Arts), including its independent European branch SLSAeu.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Series Editor: Marcel Danesi
In an age of numbers, intellectual and aesthetic partnerships between mathematicians and the contemporary arts, humanities, and entertainment worlds have become virtually routine. Movies, television shows, and websites built around, or involving, mathematics are now commonplace. Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities (MIAH) deals with all aspects of this partnership. The monographs and edited volumes of this book series explore all aspects of mathematics outside of mathematics itself, that is, as a cultural, aesthetic, and representational phenomenon. Each work examines some particular aspect, text, or event that falls under this rubric, from mathematics in natural phenomena (e.g., the Fibonacci Series), to math in myth and mysticism (e.g., the ancient Egyptian god Horus), in the arts (e.g., the golden ratio), and in pop fiction (e.g., movies, novels). The series presents mathematics as a cultural phenomenon, rather than as an abstract technical field.

Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities also explores such areas as the role of mathematics in new forms of art, such as digital art, and websites that present interesting facts about the interconnection between math and everyday life. These are discussed in terms of critical and genre theories that apply to any textual creation. The series is thus of interest to scholars and instructors involved in interdisciplinary work in which mathematics surfaces as an ancillary or thematic focus, including culture studies, literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, and art criticism. Furthermore, it is of interest and relevance to anyone who is interested in how mathematics is evolving in cultural spaces, new and old.

Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities is published in cooperation with The Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors welcome proposals for monographs written for academics and researchers in the field that are based on original scholarly research that makes a notable contribution to the subject. The series editors will also consider proposals for edited volumes that demonstrate strong thematic coherence and continuity among the contributions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.    
Cultural and Biological Approaches to Uncover African Diversity
This book explores important chapters of past and recent African history from a multidisciplinary perspective. It covers an extensive time range from the evolution of early humans to the complex cultural and genetic diversity of modern-day populations in Africa. Through a comprehensive list of chapters, the book focuses on different time-periods, geographic regions and cultural and biological aspects of human diversity across the continent. Each chapter summarises current knowledge with perspectives from a varied set of international researchers from diverse areas of expertise. The book provides a valuable resource for scholars interested in evolutionary history and human diversity in Africa.

Contributors are Shaun Aron, Ananyo Choudhury, Bernard Clist, Cesar Fortes-Lima, Rosa Fregel, Jackson S. Kimambo, Faye Lander , Marlize Lombard, Fidelis T. Masao, Ezekia Mtetwa, Gilbert Pwiti, Michèle Ramsay, Thembi Russell, Carina Schlebusch, Dhriti Sengupta, Plan Shenjere-Nyabezi, Mário Vicente.
Author: Arie Verhagen
In these lectures, Arie Verhagen presents a version of cognitive linguistics that adheres to both the generalization and cognitive commitments that characterized the field from the start, and a biological commitment: understanding language as adaptive behavior of (human) organisms in the niche(s) that they inhabit. Drawing on the model of biological explanation (“Tinbergen’s four why’s”), Verhagen shows how proximate (individual level) and ultimate (population level) explanations apply to several features of language, shedding new light on basic notions like conventionality and entrenchment, norms/rules and habits, etc., and their causal connections. Topics include the relation between language, culture, and thinking, the role of language in social cognition and narrative, the evolution of sound structure and grammar, semantic change, and more.
The Peopling of the World from the Perspective of Language, Genes and Material Culture
This volume provides the most up-to-date and holistic but compact account of the peopling of the world from the perspective of language, genes and material culture, presenting a view from the Himalayas. The phylogeny of language families, the chronology of branching of linguistic family trees and the historical and modern geographical distribution of language communities inform us about the spread of languages and linguistic phyla. The global distribution and the chronology of spread of Y chromosomal haplogroups appears closely correlated with the spread of language families. New findings on ancient DNA have greatly enhanced our understanding of the prehistory and provenance of our biological ancestors. The archaeological study of past material cultures provides yet a third independent window onto the complex prehistory of our species.
Series Editor: Chaime Marcuello-Servós
We are living in turbulent times in which we need to face global challenges connecting fields and perspectives. Complex social issues require complex, multidisciplinary approaches to deal with their complexity. In recent decades, sociocybernetics has developed as a distinct discipline that aims to meet this challenge. Sociocybernetics is concerned with applying first and second order cybernetics, the systems sciences and complexity science in the social sciences. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity disseminates advances in sociocybernetics and consolidates existing research efforts, including theory and applications. Each installment addresses developments around a specific topic; thus, besides the audience interested in developments in sociocybernetics and the complexity sciences, each installment appeals to those in other disciplines who are engaged with a particular topic. The topics addressed range from foundational issues to applications in systems modelling, the arts, social interventions, environmental problems, social work and care, public policies, and urban design, on a local or global scale. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity is an invaluable resource for scholars, policymakers and practitioners wishing to learn about the latest developments in sociocybernetics, as well as a useful resource for teachers and those studying the social sciences and related disciplines.

Each installment is a focused monograph of approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art on a specific theme in close combination with critical analysis and research.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.
What we hear before and/or while we eat and drink often affects our tasting experiences. The focus of Auditory Contributions to Food Perception and Consume Behaviour is to provide a state-of-the-art summary on how such music and ambient inputs can influence our expectations, our purchasing behaviour, as well as our product experience. Much of the research collected together in this volume relates to ‘sonic seasoning’: This is where music/soundscapes are especially chosen, or else designed/composed, in order to correspond to, and hence hopefully to modify the associated taste/aroma/mouthfeel/flavour in food and beverages. The various chapters collected together in this volume provide a state-of-the-art summary of this intriguing and emerging field of research, as well as highlighting some of the key directions for future research. Contributors are Sue Bastian, Thadeus L. Beekman, Jo Burzynska, Andrew Childress, Ilja Croijmans, Silvana Dakduk , Alexandra Fiegel, Apratim Guha, Ryuta Kawashima, Bruno Mesz, Kosuke Motoki, Rui Nouchi, Felipe Reinoso-Carvalho, Pablo Riera, Marijn Peters Rit, Toshiki Saito, Han-Seok Seo, Mariano Sigman, Laura J. Speed, Charles Spence, Motoaki Sugiura, Marcos Trevisan, Carlos Velasco, Johan Wagemans, and Qian Janice Wang.