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Konturierungen eines umstrittenen Themas
Volume Editor: Winfried Löffler
Ein aktueller Überblick zur Ideen- und Missbrauchsgeschichte eines schillernden Schlagworts, aber auch zu seinen Potenzialen als philosophisches Analysewerkzeug.
Die Wortgeschichte von „Weltanschauung“ ist kurz: Zwischen seinem ersten, eher beiläufigen Auftauchen bei Kant 1790, subjektivierenden Aufladungen in der Romantik und den inflationären Ideologisierungen und Politisierungen von „Weltanschauung“ im späten 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert liegen nur 150 Jahre. Besonders sein Missbrauch durch NS-Ideologen hat das Wort in Verruf gebracht, es lebt aber u.a. im juristischen Sprachgebrauch fort und erlebt in der gegenwärtigen Religionskritik wieder etwas Konjunktur: Dort wird z.T. wieder eine naturalistische „wissenschaftliche Weltanschauung“ in Aussicht gestellt. Als philosophisches Analysewerkzeug hat das Wort aber Potenzial: „Weltanschauung“ könnte nicht nur für religiös-politische Bewertungen stehen, sondern auch für jenes implizite theoretische Koordinatensystem, das jeden Menschen in seinem Verstehen, Denken und Handeln leitet.
Editor: Giuseppe Veltri
Maimonides Review of Philosophy and Religion is an annual collection of double-blind peer-reviewed articles, which seeks to provide a broad international arena for an intellectual exchange of ideas between the disciplines of philosophy, theology, religion, cultural history, and literature and to showcase their multifarious junctures within the framework of Jewish studies.
Editor: Ze'ev Strauss
The Maimonides Review of Philosophy and Religion is an annual collection of double-blind peer-reviewed articles that seeks to provide a broad international arena for an intellectual exchange of ideas between the disciplines of philosophy, theology, religion, cultural history, and literature and to showcase their multifarious junctures within the framework of Jewish studies. Contributions to the Review place special thematic emphasis on scepticism within Jewish thought and its links to other religious traditions and secular worldviews. The Review is interested in the tension at the heart of matters of reason and faith, rationalism and mysticism, theory and practice, narrativity and normativity, doubt and dogma. This volume features contributions by Reimund Leicht, Gitit Holzman, Jonathan Garb, Anna Lissa, Gianni Paganini, Adi Louria Hayon, Mark Marion Gondelman, and Jürgen Sarnowsky.
Eric Voegelin-Studies: Yearbook publishes peer-reviewed, scholarly articles related to Eric Voegelin in the areas of political theory, history of political ideas, civilization history, sociology, philosophy, literature, and theology. Articles are accepted from various sources, including the Annual Conferences of the Eric-Voegelin-Gesellschaft and of the Eric Voegelin Society.
Author: Emmanuel Bermon
Écrite entre 386 et 390 dans l’effervescence de la découverte du néoplatonisme, la correspondance entre Augustin et son ami Nebridius est un concentré de questions platoniciennes sur l’infini, la distinction entre le sensible et l’intelligible, l’imagination et la réminiscence, les rêves inspirés, l’assimilation à Dieu, le « véhicule » de l’âme, l’intériorité et l’individualité. S’y ajoutent des développements théologiques majeurs sur l’Incarnation et la Trinité. Grâce à ces lettres qui font tour à tour « entendre le Christ, Platon et Plotin », comme le dit Nebridius lui-même, nous comprenons mieux ce moment incandescent de la vie d’Augustin où il se convertit à la fois à la philosophie et au christianisme, comme en témoigneront plus tard les Confessions.

Written between 386 and 390 during the excitement of his discovery of Neoplatonism, Augustine’s correspondence with his friend Nebridius is a distillation of Platonic questions concerning the infinite, the distinction between sensible and intelligible phenomena, the imagination and recollection, inspired dreams, assimilation to God, the “vehicle” of the soul, interiority, and individuality. In addition, the exchange contains major theological insights concerning the Incarnation and the Trinity. Thanks to these letters, which, as Nebridius himself says, make “Christ, Plato, and Plotinus heard,” we can better understand this incandescent moment in Augustine’s life when he converted to both philosophy and Christianity, as the Confessions will later testify.
Author: Sam Mickey
New Materialism and Theology reflects on questions of human embodiment, nonhuman agency, technological innovation, and what really matters now and in possible futures. Bringing theological inquiry together with the philosophical movement of new materialism, Sam Mickey points toward a variety of ways for thinking about matter and everything that materializes in human and more-than-human worlds. Mickey provides introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between various theological and materialist ideas and practices. He examines the self-declared novelty and materiality of new materialism, noting the limitations of those labels while articulating the very new and quite material challenges that new materialism does indeed pose, challenges of urgent existential importance that demand theological responses. New Materialism and Theology faces the theological implications and material possibilities facing humanity while ecological and technological realities seem to be pointing toward posthuman or transhuman futures or perhaps something else entirely.
Author: Mark Bevir
In this volume, Mark Bevir argues that postfoundationalism is compatible with humanism and historicism. He shows how postmodernists, especially Derrida and Foucault, drew on structuralism and the avant-garde in ways that led them to downplay human agency and historical context. He then explores how we today might recover and rethink humanism and historicism. And, finally, he discusses the critical and ethical practices that such ideas might inspire.
Jacob Taubes is one of the most significant intellectual figures in the more recent German intellectual scene—and beyond. However, Taubes was either dismissed as a highly controversial character, or as a mere commentator of ongoing debates, or the reception was restricted to his considerations on religion and the ambivalences of secularity. This volume challenges these reductions by putting Taubes' original, albeit marginalised, texts into new, sometimes surprising contexts. Furthermore, it relates familiar topics in his oeuvre to lesser-known themes that are still highly pertinent for contemporary discussions on faith, modernity, and the limits of politics.
Volume Editors: John T. Slotemaker and Eileen Sweeney
These essays present new readings of Anselm’s speculative and spiritual writings on topics including his relationship to Augustine, proofs for God’s existence, faith and reason, human freedom and the problem of evil, his spiritual meditations and prayers, as well as Anselm’s reception by 19th and 20th century thinkers, modernism, and feminism. These philosophical, theological and literary analyses bring fresh perspectives on Anselm both in his historical context and in dialogue with contemporary questions.

Contributors are: Tomas Ekenberg, Riccardo Fredriga, Emery de Gaál, Kyle Philip Hubbard, Maggie Ann Labinski, Roberto Limonta, Ian Logan, Gavin Ortlund, M.B. Pranger, Gregory B. Sadler, Kevin Staley, Karen Sullivan, Eileen C. Sweeney, Michael Vendsel, Luca Vettorello, James Wetzel, and Kevin White.
Karl Löwith, Hans Blumenberg and Carl Schmitt in Polemical Contexts
In Contesting Modernity in the German Secularization Debate, Sjoerd Griffioen investigates the polemics between Karl Löwith, Hans Blumenberg and Carl Schmitt on the role of religion in modernity. He analyzes their contributions to the development of the broader German secularization debate between the 1950s and 1980s. As this development is traced, special attention is paid to how after 1968 this debate increasingly centered on Schmitt’s notion of political theology and its appropriation by the Left. This is evinced in the work of Jacob Taubes, who is opposed by Odo Marquard, assuming a Blumenbergian-secularist position in this new political landscape. Griffioen concludes with a methodological reflection on the value of ‘Geistesgeschichte’ and by identifying parallels with the contemporary discourse of postsecularism.