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In Argument is War: Relevance-Theoretic Comprehension of the Conceptual Metaphor of War in the Apocalypse, Clifford T. Winters demonstrates that the apparent war in the Apocalypse is rather telling the story of the gospel: how Christ will restore Israel and, through them, the rest of the world. When Revelation is viewed through the corrective lens of cognitive linguistics, its violence becomes victory, its violent characters become Christ, and its bloody end becomes the blessed beginning of the New Jerusalem. Revelation is simply telling the story of the early church (the Gospels and Acts) to the early church, and it is using a conceptual metaphor (‘ARGUMENT IS WAR’) to do it.
Author: Xander van Eck
The Gouda Windows (1552-1572): Art and Catholic Renewal on the Eve of the Dutch Revolt offers the first complete analysis of the cycle of monumental Renaissance stained-glass windows donated to the Sint Janskerk in Gouda, after a fire gutted it in 1552. Central among the donors were king Philip II of Spain and bishop of Utrecht Joris van Egmond, who worked together to reform the Church. The inventor of the iconographic program, a close associate to the bishop as well as the king, strove to renew Catholic art by taking the words of Jesus as a starting point. Defining Catholic religion based on widely accepted biblical truths, the ensemble shows that the Mother Church can accommodate all true Christians.
In Violence in the Hebrew Bible scholars reflect on texts of violence in the Hebrew Bible, as well as their often problematic reception history. Authoritative texts and traditions can be rewritten and adapted to new circumstances and insights. Texts are subject to a process of change. The study of the ways in which these (authoritative) biblical texts are produced and/or received in various socio-historical circumstances discloses a range of theological and ideological perspectives. In reflecting on these issues, the central question is how to allow for a given text’s plurality of possible and realised meanings while also retaining the ability to form critical judgments regarding biblical exegesis. This volume highlight that violence in particular is a fruitful area to explore this tension.
Johannine Christology provides a snapshot of the foremost investigations of this important topic by a selection of scholars representing a range of expertise in this field. The volume is organized into four major parts, which are concerned with the formation of Johannine Christology, Johannine Christology in Hellenistic and Jewish contexts, Christology and the literary character of the Johannine writings, and the application of Christology for the Johannine audience and beyond.

The fifteen contributors to this volume comprise an international set of Johannine scholars who explore various ways of both describing and then pursuing the implications of Johannine Christology. Their contributions focus primarily upon the Gospel, but involve other key texts as well.
In: Johannine Christology
In: Johannine Christology
In: Johannine Christology
In: Johannine Christology
In: Johannine Christology
In: Johannine Christology