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Editor-in-Chief: Zhi CHEN
This is a peer-reviewed, inclusive, non-Eurocentric, multi-disciplinary book series devoted to the interdisciplinary study of ancient civilizations from all continents.
- ALAC is fully-funded by the Research Centre For History and Culture (RCHC). All volumes are published under a CC BY-NC-ND license.
- Proposals must present original work and must have been submitted exclusively to ALAC. Both monographs and edited volumes are welcome.
- Submissions may regard any civilizations from any continents, developed between prehistory and the 15th century AD, that is, the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire.
- Submissions may regard any aspects of Antiquity: history, archaeology, art and architecture, philology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, etc.
- ALAC also considers studies of oral literature, such as proverbs and folklore, as well as field work on endangered languages, which represent the legacy of ancient traditions verbally transmitted from generation to generation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and full manuscripts by email to the Series Editors: Professor CHEN Zhi , Professor Carlotta Viti , and Dr WANG Xiang (Shawn Wang) .
Essays on Britannicus and Bérénice
Volume Editors: Nicholas Hammond and Paul Hammond
In two of his most famous plays, Britannicus and Bérénice, Racine depicts the tragedies of characters trapped by the ideals, desires, and cruelties of ancient Rome. This international collection of essays deploys cutting-edge research to illuminate the plays and their contexts.
For Racine, Rome is more than a location, it is a set of values and traditions, a space of opportunity and oppression. The contributors to this volume examine Racine’s stagecraft, his exploration of time and space, sound and silence, and the ways in which he develops his own distinctive understanding of tragedy. The reception of his plays by contemporaries and subsequent generations also features. In Racine’s hands, Rome becomes a state of mind, haunted by both past and future.
From Animators’ Perspectives
Volume Editor: Daisy Yan Du
This volume on Chinese animation and socialism is the first in English that introduces the insider viewpoints of socialist animators at the Shanghai Animation Film Studio in China. Although a few monographs have been published in English on Chinese animation, they are from the perspective of scholars rather than of the animators who personally worked on the films, as discussed in this volume. Featuring hidden histories and names behind the scenes, precious photos, and commentary on rarely seen animated films, this book is a timely and useful reference book for researchers, students, animators, and fans interested in Chinese and even world animation.

This book originated from the Animators’ Roundtable Forum (April 2017 at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), organized by the Association for Chinese Animation Studies.
Inspiring Change through the Humanities
Imaginative Ecologies: Inspiring Change through the Humanities highlights the role literature and visual arts play in fostering sustainability. It weaves together contributions by international scholars, practitioners and environmental activists whose insights are brought together to illustrate how creative imaginations can inspire change. One of the most outstanding characteristic of this volume is its interdisciplinarity and its varied methods of inquiry. The field of environmental humanities is discussed together with ideas such as the role of the public intellectual and el buen vivir. Examples of ecofiction from the UK, the US and Spain are analysed while artistic practices aimed at raising awareness of the effects of the Anthropocene are presented as imaginative ways of reacting against climate change and rampant capitalism.
Focusing on literary and non-literary works alike, Interpretation and Visual Poetics in Medieval and Early Modern Texts places visual and material aspects of literary study at the center of the interpretive process. The essays in this collection explore new and traditional areas of research from hermeneutics, to codicology and history of the book, to cultures of sound and the digital humanities. They address the texts themselves, as well as their early manuscripts and subsequent printed and digital editions. The contributors collectively cover a time span of over 1000 years, and begin with the Mediterranean, focusing on texts produced in Italy and the Languedoc regions, then radiate outward to analyse the texts’ material containers (manuscripts, print, and digital editions) that are now housed worldwide.

Contributors are: Michelangelo Zaccarello, Daniel O’Sullivan, Valerio Cappozzo, Jelena Todorović, Christopher Kleinhenz, Mirko Tavoni, Isabella Magni, Francesco Marco Aresu, Dario Del Puppo, Beatrice Arduini, Giovanni Spani, Furio Brugnolo, Teodolinda Barolini, Alessandro Vettori, Marcello Ciccuto, Marco Veglia, Michael Papio, and Anthony Nussmeier.
Envisioning Empire in the Middle Ages
Volume Editor: Jace Stuckey
There are few historical figures in the Middle Ages that cast a larger shadow than Charlemagne. This volume brings together a collection of studies on the Charlemagne legend from a wide range of fields, not only adding to the growing corpus of work on this legendary figure, but opening new avenues of inquiry by bringing together innovative trends that cross disciplinary boundaries. This collection expands the geographical frontiers, and extends the chronological scope beyond the Middle Ages from the heart of Carolingian Europe to Spain, England, and Iceland. The Charlemagne found here is one both familiar and strange and one who is both celebrated and critiqued.
Contributors are Jada Bailey, Cullen Chandler, Carla Del Zotto, William Diebold, Christopher Flynn, Ana Grinberg, Elizabeth Melick, Jace Stuckey, and Larissa Tracy.
Volume Editors: Thijs Porck and Harriet Soper
How did the life course, with all its biological, social and cultural aspects, influence the lives, writings, and art of the inhabitants of early medieval England? This volume explores how phases of human life such as childhood, puberty, and old age were identified, characterized, and related in contemporary sources, as well as how nonhuman life courses were constructed. The multi-disciplinary contributions range from analyses of age vocabulary to studies of medicine, name-giving practices, theology, Old English poetry, and material culture. Combined, these cultural-historical perspectives reveal how the concept and experience of the life course shaped attitudes in early medieval England.
Contributors are Jo Appleby, Debby Banham, Darren Barber, Caroline R. Batten, James Chetwood, Katherine Cross, Amy Faulkner, Jacqueline Fay, Elaine Flowers, Daria Izdebska, Gale R. Owen-Crocker, Thijs Porck, and Harriet Soper.
Poissons qui grimpent aux arbres, cigognes qui prennent soin de leurs parents… A l’ère prémoderne, les textes et les arts visuels forment un fabuleux bestiaire qui révèle l’inventivité et la richesse de la réflexion sur les animaux. Les études de ce volume vous font découvrir l’animal dans tous ses états : est-il une simple image anthropomorphique de l’homme ? Un modèle à suivre ? Ou même un être autonome, égal ou supérieur à l’homme ? Explorant une diversité de textes – fables, poésie, roman, récits de voyage, emblèmes – et de médias visuels – peinture, tapisserie, bijouterie, ce volume montre les fructueux échanges prémodernes entre l’histoire naturelle et les arts. En interrogeant implicitement la nécessité de dépasser l’anthropocentrisme et l’anthropomorphisme régnants, il s’inscrit dans les nouvelles tendances de la critique culturelle.

Fish climbing trees, storks taking care of their parents… Premodern textual and visual culture presents us with a fabulous bestiary that reveals ingenious and rich reflections on the animal kingdom. The studies united in this volume will allow you to discover animals in all their possible states: are they simple anthropomorphic images of man? Models to follow? Or autonomous beings, equal or even superior to man? By exploring a large diversity of texts – fables, poetry, novels, travel narratives, emblematic works – and visual media – paintings, tapestries, jewellery, this richly illustrated volume displays the fruitful premodern exchanges between natural history and culture. It follows new trends in cultural criticism by implicitly interrogating the need to move beyond the reigning paradigms of anthropocentrism and anthropomorphism.