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Postcolonial Literatures of Climate Change investigates the evolving nature of postcolonial literary criticism in response to global, regional, and local environmental transformations brought about by climate change. It builds upon, and extends, previous studies in postcolonial ecocriticism to demonstrate how the growing awareness of human-caused global warming has begun to permeate literary consciousness, praxis and analysis. The breadth of the volume’s coverage – the diversity of its focal locations, cultures, genres and texts – serves as a salient reminder that, while climate change is global, its impacts vary, effecting peoples from place to place unequally, and often in accordance with their particular historical experience of colonialism and neo-colonialism, as well as their ongoing marginalisations.

“Demonstrating the urgency of invoking novel epistemological approaches combining the scientific and the imaginative, this book is a “must read” for those concerned about the present and potential impacts of climate change on formerly colonised areas of the world. The comprehensive and illuminating Introduction offers a crucial history and current state of postcolonial ecocriticism as it has been and is addressing climate crises.”
- Helen Tiffin, University of Wollongong

“The broad focus on the polar regions, the Pacific and the Caribbean – with added essays on environmental justice/activism in India and Egypt – opens up rich terrain for examination under the rubric of postcolonial and ecocritical analysis, not only expanding recent studies in this field but also enabling new comparisons and conceptual linkages.” - Helen Gilbert, Royal Holloway, University of London

“The subject is topical and vital and will become even more so as the problem of how to reconcile the demands of climate change with the effects on regions and individual nations already damaged by the economic effects of colonisation and the subsequent inequalities resulting from neo-colonialism continues to grow.” - Gareth Griffiths, Em. Prof. University of Western Australia

¿Qué ocurrió con Filipinas después de “los últimos de Filipinas”? ¿Tiene que ver su proceso de emancipación con el de otros países latinoamericanos? ¿Es la modernidad filipina un producto exclusivo de la invasión estadounidense? Este libro colectivo supera agendas nostálgicas y neocoloniales para acercarse desde una multiplicidad de perspectivas a las décadas clave que llevaron a una serie de intelectuales hispanohablantes a imaginarse como nación y reflejarlo en revistas feministas, libros de viaje o novelas costumbristas. Los estudios permitirán puntos de comparación con otras literaturas en español así como una profundización en la compleja sociedad filipina del cambio de siglo, con sus salas de jazz, su sufragismo y su independentismo, pero a la vez su defensa del español y el catolicismo.

What happened to the Philippines after 1898? Does its emancipation process have anything to do with that of other Latin American countries? Is Philippine modernity an exclusive product of the US invasion? This collective book overcomes nostalgic and neo-colonial agendas to approach from a multiplicity of perspectives the key decades that led a series of Spanish-speaking intellectuals to imagine themselves as a nation and reflect it in feminist magazines, travel books or costumbrista fiction. The studies will allow points of comparison with other literatures in Spanish as well as approaching the complex Philippine society of the turn of the century, with its jazz halls, its suffragism and its independence, but at the same time its defence of Spanish language and Catholicism.
With this volume, the editors Katharina Edtstadler, Sandra Folie, and Gianna Zocco propose an extension of the traditional conception of imagology as a theory and method for studying the cultural construction and literary representation of national, usually European characters. Consisting of an instructive introduction and 21 articles, the book relates this sub-field of comparative literature to contemporary political developments and enriches it with new interdisciplinary, transnational, intersectional, and intermedial perspectives. The contributions offer [1] a reconsideration and update of the field’s methods, genres, and theoretical frames; [2] trans-/post-national, migratory, and marginalized perspectives beyond the European nation-state; [3] insights into geopolitical dichotomies such as Orient/Occident; [4] intersectional approaches considering the entanglements of national images with notions of age, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity/race; [5] investigations of the role of national images in visual narratives and music.
Founded in 1972, this series welcomes publications that further develop the field of German-language literature(s) and cultural studies from 1700 onwards. This includes themed-anthologies and monographs offering state-of-the-art research, as well as critical editions, primary sources or collections.

Our mission remains to publish high quality research including new discussions of established authors, research on heretofore neglected masterpieces, as well as the consideration of German literary studies as a discipline both within and beyond the academy. Consequently, the series offers a venue for a variety of genres rediscovered in literature and cultural studies, including the study of the essay, literary biographies and periodicals. We also welcome studies in which German literature is treated in connection with other disciplines such as media studies, the fine arts, as well as the natural sciences.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.