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In this book Elizabeth Walgenbach argues that outlawry in medieval Iceland was a punishment shaped by the conventions of excommunication as it developed in the medieval Church. Excommunication and outlawry resemble one another, often closely, in a range of Icelandic texts, including lawcodes and narrative sources such as the contemporary sagas. This is not a chance resemblance but a by-product of the way the law was formed and written. Canon law helped to shape the outlines of secular justice.
The book is organized into chapters on excommunication, outlawry, outlawry as secular excommunication, and two case studies—one focused on the conflicts surrounding Bishop Guðmundr Arason and another focused on the outlaw Aron Hjǫrleifsson.
Transnational Perspectives, Translation Processes, Scandinavian and Postcolonial Challenges
Examining the cultural dynamics of translation and transfer, Cultural Transfer Reconsideredproposes new insights into both epistemological and analytical questions raised in the research area of cultural transfer. Seeking to emphasize the creative processes of transfer, Steen Bille Jørgensen and Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink have invited specialized researchers to determine the role of structures and agents in the dynamics of cultural encounters. With its particular focus on the North, as opposed to the South, the volume problematizes national paradigms. Presenting various aspects of tri- and multilateral transfers involving Scandinavian countries, Cultural Transfer Reconsidered opens perspectives regarding the ways in which textual, intertextual and artistic practices, in particular, pave the way for postcolonial interrelatedness.

Contributors: Miriam Lay Brander, Petra Broomans, Michel Espagne, Karin Hoff, Steen Bille Jørgensen, Anne-Estelle Leguy, Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink, Walter Moser, Magnus Qvistgaard, Anna Sandberg, Udo Schöning, Wiebke Röben de Alencar Xavier
Produktion in Skandinavien und Rezeption im deutschsprachigen Raum
Im skandinavischen Kriminalroman dringt das Verbrechen meist von außen in die Gesellschaft ein und insbesondere Russland gilt als Ursprungsort des Bösen. Damit leistet diese auf dem deutschsprachigen Buchmarkt äußerst populäre Gattung eine Fremdbeschreibung Russlands, die sowohl in Skandinavien als auch Deutschland breit rezipiert wird. Die zentrale Fragestellung dieses Buches geht den Produktions- und Transfermechanismen nach, die bei der Übernahme gesellschaftspolitischer Diskurse und Kontaktereignisse in die Fiktion zum Tragen kommen. Welche Elemente werden für die Beschreibung russischer Figuren verwendet, welche Veränderung erfahren sie über den Zeitraum der letzten fünfzig Jahre und wie vermischen die Erzählungen dabei Fakten und Fiktion? Zusätzlich werden auch die Vermarktungsstrategien bei der Übersetzung ins Deutsche analysiert, sodass anhand dieser Transferkette auch die Distributionswege von Stereotypen offengelegt werden können.
In this volume, seventeen scholars from Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, and Slovakia present their research on the formation and transformation of national literary canons as a practice of nation-building in Central Europe and the Baltics.The articles focus on the shaping of national identities through literature and analyze the establishment of literary canons by means of language, the role of national poets, and similar topics. Case studies of so-called minor literatures reveal common tendencies in the structure of many national canons, as well as specific responses and creative decisions in nation-building processes. This volume rethinks the relations between literature and nationalism (from the 19th century to present times) and contributes to the field of studies of historical development of nationalism.

Contributors are: Olga Bartosiewicz-Nikolaev, Renata Beličová, Ramunė Bleizgienė, Paweł Bukowiec, Anna R. Burzyńska, Judit Dobry, Gergely Fórizs, Katre Kikas, Aistė Kučinskienė, Helena Markowska-Fulara, Radosław Okulicz-Kozaryn, Jurga Sadauskienė, Vaidas Šeferis, Viktorija Šeina, Brigita Speičytė, Jagoda Wierzejska, and Krystyna Zabawa.
Author: Eric T. Lander
The task of reconstructing the reinforced demonstrative paradigm for early Nordic has been called “impossible” by the eminent Einar Haugen. In The History of the Reinforced Demonstrative in Nordic, Eric T. Lander aims to accomplish exactly this, by way of an exhaustive study of the pronoun’s attestations in the Viking Age runic inscriptions, which are the earliest forms of this item to be recorded in Scandinavia. The detailed picture of regional variation that emerges is then used to inform reconstructions of the paradigm from Proto-Nordic to Common Nordic. The book represents the first serious attempt in historical-comparative linguistics to grapple with the morphological development of the North-West Germanic reinforced demonstrative since the work of 19th-century scholars like Sophus Bugge.
Author: Jan Rüdiger
Polygyny, in Europe? The grand narrative of Western history is the development of monogamous marriage, culminating in the central Middle Ages. Other kinds of relationships have often, perhaps too lightly, been dismissed as ‘just lust’. In this book, Jan Rüdiger investigates the plurality of man-woman relationships in medieval Scandinavia and analyses the social and political ‘uses’ of elite polygyny.
By way of comparison the findings from the North are then applied to England, France, and the Iberian Peninsula, in order to propose a new overall image of elite polygyny, including marriage, in the medieval West.
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Author: Bernd Roling
From a modern point of view, the four volumes of the Atlantica of Olaus Rudbeck the elder (1630-1702) seem to be not only the climax of Gothicism, but a key example of an early modern polymath. In Odins Imperium Bernd Roling reconstructs Rudbeck’s immense influence at Scandinavian universities, the debates he provoked, his manifold reception in early modern academic culture and the role Rudbeckianism played as paradigm of science until the Swedish romanticism of the 19th century. Taking into account all branches of science, Bernd Roling illustrates in detail Rudbeck’s majestic impact on antiquarianism, national mythology, and also on religious sciences and linguistics, but also documents the massive criticism the scholar from Uppsala received almost immediately.

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Dalir and the Eyjafjörður region c.870-c.1265
Author: Chris Callow
Chris Callow’s Landscape, Tradition and Power critically examines the evidence for socio-political developments in medieval Iceland during the so-called Commonwealth period. The book compares regions in the west and north-east of Iceland because these regions had differing human and physical geographies, and contrasting levels of surviving written evidence. Callow sets out the likely economies and institutional frameworks in which political action took place. He then examines different forms of evidence – the Contemporary sagas, Landnámabók (The Book of Settlements), and Sagas of Icelanders – considering how each describes different periods of the Commonwealth present political power. Among its conclusions the book emphasises stasis over change and the need to appreciate the nuances and purposes of Iceland’s historicising sagas.

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Arctic Lessons Learnt for the Regulation and Management of Tourism in the Antarctic
Author: Antje Neumann
Antarctica’s wilderness values, even though specifically recognized by the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty, are rarely considered in practice. This deficiency is especially apparent with regard to a more and more increasing human footprint caused, among others, by a growing number of tourists visiting the region and conducting a broad variety of activities.
On the basis of a detailed study of three Arctic wilderness areas – the Hammastunturi Wilderness Reserve (Finland), the Archipelago of Svalbard (Norway) and the Denali National Park and Preserve (Alaska, United States) – as well as the relevant policies and legislation in these countries, Antje Neumann identifies numerous ‘lessons learnt’ that can serve as suggestions for improving the protection of wilderness in Antarctica.
In the book Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic, Koivurova and Kopra (editors) offer a comprehensive account of China’s evolving interests, policies and strategies in the Arctic region. Despite its lack of geography north of the Arctic Circle, China’s presence in the High North is expected to grow in the coming years, which, in turn, is likely to speed up globalization in the region. This book brings together experts on China and the Arctic, each chapter contributing to a detailed overview of China’s diplomatic, economic, environmental, scientific and strategic presence in the Arctic and its influence on regional affairs. The book is of interest to students, scholars and those dealing with China’s foreign policy and Arctic affairs.