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This book offers something new, a full-length study of printing Anglo-Saxon (Old English) from 1566 to 1705, combining analysis of content and form of production. It starts from the end-product and addresses the practical issues of providing for printing Anglo-Saxon authentically, and why this was done. The book tells a story that is largely Cambridge-orientated until Oxford made an impact, largely thanks to Franciscus Junius from Leiden. There is a catalogue of all books containing Anglo-Saxon, with full details of their use of manuscript or printed sources. This information allows us to see how knowledge of Anglo-Saxon grew and developed.
Beautifying the Ugly and Uglifying the Beautiful by Abū Manṣūr al-Thaʿālibī (d. 429/1039)
In his Beautifying the Ugly and Uglifying the Beautiful (Taḥsīn al-qabīḥ wa-taqbīḥ al-ḥasan) the prolific anthologist al-Thaʿālibī (d. 429/1037) offers a thematically arranged selection of Arabic poems and prose anecdotes or sayings with contrary or paradoxical purport, such as praise of miserliness, boredom, sickness, and death, or condemnation of generosity, intelligence, youth, and music. The book is both entertaining and informative, giving insight in premodern Arab and Islamic culture. It contains a new edition of the Arabic text and a complete English translation (the first in any language) with extensive annotation, preceded by an introduction with the necessary background of the genre.
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Nahj al-Balāghah, the celebrated compendium of orations, letters, and sayings of ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (d. 40/661) compiled by al-Sharīf al-Raḍī (d. 406/1015), is a masterpiece of Arabic literature and Islamic wisdom studied and memorized avidly and continually for over a thousand years. Showcasing ʿAlī’s life and travails in his own words, it also transcribes his profound reflections on piety and virtue, and on just and compassionate governance. Tahera Qutbuddin’s meticulously researched critical edition based on the earliest 5th/11th-century manuscripts, with a lucid, annotated facing-page translation, brings to the modern reader the power and beauty of this influential text, and confirms the aptness of Raḍī’s title, “The Way of Eloquence.”
The book presents the latest research and reflects on the relationships between the media and politics, using the case study method. It delves into the interests of Polish researchers from various centres. The individual chapters focus on different types of both old and new media, including the press, books, radio and the Internet. The authors are historians, media experts and political scientists, sociologists, cultural experts, linguists and representatives of other disciplines. As a result, the research methods, hypotheses and research results present a range of perspectives.