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Author: Emma Wagstaff
In André du Bouchet: Poetic Forms of Attention, Emma Wagstaff provides the first book-length study in English of this major poet of the second half of the twentieth century. She shows how Du Bouchet’s rigorous and innovative creative and critical writing advances our understanding of attention.
Du Bouchet is known as a post-war poet of the natural world and the space of the page. Far from just a solitary writer, however, he engaged with others through his work as editor, critic, and translator, and his involvement in the protests of May 1968. Emma Wagstaff shows how his writing demonstrates nuanced attention to language, time, nature, and art, and incites a ‘slow’ response on the part of the reader.
Global Perspectives on Biography in Public Cultures and Societies
Internationally acclaimed biographies are almost always written by British or American biographers. But what is the state of the art of biography in other parts of the world? Introduced by Richard Holmes, the volume Different Lives offers a global perspective: seventeen scholars vividly describe the biographical tradition in their countries of interest. They show how biography functions as a public genre, featuring specific societal issues and opinion-making. Indeed, the volume aims to answer the question: how can biography contribute to a better understanding of differences between societies and cultures? Special attention is given to the US, China and the Netherlands. Other contributions are on Australia, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Iceland, Iran, Italy, New Zealand, Spain, and South Africa.

"This book represents a much needed breakdown of the history and current status of Biography Studies throughout the world. Any educator teaching a course in higher education that includes Biography Studies should definitely consider this as a major text for inclusion."
Billy Tooma, film maker and Assistant Professor, Wessex County College

"The rise of biography is the literary event of our time; Hamilton and Renders are its pioneer scholars, and their compelling primer is a must read."
Joanny Moulin, Institut Universitaire de France, on Nigel Hamilton and Hans Renders, in: The ABC of Modern Biography (2018)
Travellers and Trendsetters, 1870-1970
Destination for artists and convalescents, playground of the rich, site of foreign allure, the French Riviera has long attracted visitors to its shores. Ranging through the late nineteenth century, the Belle Epoque, the ‘roaring twenties’, and the emancipatory post-war years, Rosemary Lancaster highlights the contributions of nine remarkable women to the cultural identity of the Riviera in its seminal rise to fame. Embracing an array of genres, she gives new focus to feminine writings never previously brought together, nor as richly critically explored. Fiction, memoir, diary, letters, even cookbooks and choreographies provide compelling evidence of the innovativeness of women who seized the challenges and opportunities of their travels in a century of radical social and artistic change.
In: Women Writing on the French Riviera
Poetologische Experimente mit einer Gattung ohne Poetik
Im Unterschied zu vielen Genres in der abendländischen Tradition gibt es für biographisches Schreiben keine Gattungspoetiken, nur Prototypen, Vorbilder, und die bis heute dominante Erzählordnung ist die chronologische. Kausal- und Finalnexus eines Lebens werden so in wissenschaftlichen wie literarischen Biographien in der Regel behauptet und miteinander verbunden. Die Aufsätze dieses Bandes stellen im Kontrast dazu Variationsmöglichkeiten biographischer Poetologie vor, historische wie gegenwärtige Experimente, (inter-)mediale Spielformen wie Alternativen der Narration. Einige der Beiträge sind zugleich Werkstattberichte von Biographen, die Auskunft über die Konstruktionsprinzipien ihres Schreibens geben.
Der Titel des Bandes bezieht sich auf Max Frischs Theaterstück Biografie: Ein Spiel, das 1967 entstand und 1968 im Schauspielhaus Zürich uraufgeführt wurde, und variiert dessen Ausgangsbedingung, ersetzt den Registrator, der dem Helden Kürmann erlaubt, sein Leben – immer wieder dessen entscheidende Situationen verändernd – neu zu leben, durch den Biographen, der die Vita des Biographierten in allen ihren Handlungsoptionen als ein offenes Experiment zu beschreiben versucht.

Beiträge teilweise in Englisch (siehe Inhaltsverzeichnis)

Abstract

The Russian Bronislava Nijinska was part of Serge Diaghilev’s ground-breaking Ballet Russes between 1911 and 1914 and between 1921 and 1926, as both dancer and radical choreographer. Based in Monte Carlo from 1909, the Ballets Russes rapidly attracted international attention. In Les Biches Nijinska drew upon the phenomenon of 1920s Riviera society, epitomized by flappers, jazz enthusiasts, and party-crazy ‘bright young things’. Le Train bleu, set on a beach, features such contemporary icons as sun-worshippers, tennis players, athletic bathers, and aeroplanes. Drawing on her posthumous memoir and her revolutionary treatise on dance and movement, this chapter considers how her dance creations captured the heady spirit of the times.

In: Women Writing on the French Riviera

Abstract

When Alice Williamson’s novel The Guests of Hercules appeared in 1912, Monte Carlo had become the international hub of the gambling world. By then Williamson was at the height of her fame as a writer of popular fictions that drew substantially on her travels abroad. Living for many years in Monte Carlo and herself a modest gambler, she was well placed to portray the gambling society of the Belle Epoque. Within the parameters of popular romance fiction, Williamson’s story gives a vivid picture of the sumptuous casino and the mammonistic hedonism of its Belle Epoque clientele.

In: Women Writing on the French Riviera

Abstract

The British Elizabeth David and American Julia Child published their first cookery books in 1950 and 1961 respectively. David had visited Antibes and the Mediterranean at the height of the Second World War and returned to England in 1946, inspired by the southern diet and convinced that the blandness of postwar rationed food could affordably be revised. The result was momentous: her book sold prolifically, and her name became a household word. Her recipes were notably simple, the content authentic, and the writing evocative and culturally informed. In 1953 Julia Child, a recently qualified Cordon Bleu cook, accompanied her husband to Marseille, where she delighted in the liveliness of the markets and fishing harbour, and the range and abundance of fresh produce: a stark contrast with American supermarkets and their stocks of frozen and packaged foods. Unlike David’s regard for ambience, colourful asides, and discursiveness she opted for plain prose, methodical directions, and an unfussy approach. Yet both women seduced their readers, broadened culinary habits, and brought Continental cooking to the tables of their compatriots.

In: Women Writing on the French Riviera
In: Women Writing on the French Riviera
In: Women Writing on the French Riviera