Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 41 items for :

  • Memory Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Memory is always moving ‒ between the individual and the collective, the local and the (trans)national, the past, the present, and the future. Remembering simultaneously creates and reveals connections across cultural, sociopolitical, and epistemological spheres. Such entanglements can be uneven or ambivalent in nature. Recent approaches frame and understand memory discourses as mobile, with the potential to mobilize individual and collective agency to serve diverging political ends.

Memory studies, consolidated as a field of research over the past few decades, remains a vibrant intellectual and political project, particularly since broadening its conceptual and contextual horizons beyond the received paradigms of nation, region, and culture. Responding to this development, the editors of this series are particularly interested in projects that adopt a comparative approach, bringing postcolonial, migration, transregional, social movement, and performance studies into dialogue with memory studies. In this vein, we welcome scholarly work which explores memory in relation to postcoloniality, transculturality, and intersectionality, as well as projects that interrogate how memories can be a resource for the future which they inevitably shape.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals for manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn and Iulia Ivana.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.

All submissions are subject to a double-anonymous peer review process prior to publication.

Brill's program in Memory Studies also includes a series of handbooks, Brill’s Handbook Series in Memory Studies and a journal, Memory Studies Review, starting in 2024.
This collection focuses on the specific issue of controversy as a cross-sectional aspect of contemporary children’s and YA literature, in a spectrum stretching from national experiences, to explore the impact of specific historical, economic and social environments on the rise of controversies; to inter-national exchanges in which controversies are generated specifically by the interactions between cultures; to international contexts that deal with controversies relevant on a global scale. By adopting controversy as an adjustable lens for a joined consideration of literary themes, narrative or aesthetic solutions, translation choices, publishing and marketing decisions, and discursive practices, the volume establishes a diversified collection of chapters that offers new insight into functions of children’s and YA literature in contemporary culture.
Memory, Identity and the Haunted Imagination in Contemporary Literature and Art
How does the spectre appear in Icelandic literature and visual art created in the aftermath of the economic crash in Iceland in 2008? Why does it emerge at that specific point in time and what can it tell us about repressed collective memories in Iceland? The book explores how the crash becomes an implicit background setting in novels that address the silences and gaps of the family archive, and how crime fiction employs generic features of horror to explicitly tackle the ghosts residing in the lost homes of the financial crash. Spectral space is an apparent theme of cultural memories produced in times of crisis, and the book explores how this is made apparent in visual art of the period.
Anna Langfus a contribué à un renouvellement majeur de la littérature de la Shoah, qui, avant ses publications, était largement dominée par le récit du témoin. Elle est l’auteure de pièces de théâtre et de trois romans : Le Sel et le soufre (1960), Les Bagages de sable (1962), lauréat du prix Goncourt, et Saute, Barbara (1965). Bien qu’ayant vécu les horreurs du génocide, elle n’a pas exprimé sa souffrance par l’autobiographie. Dans son œuvre elle explore, sans pathos, la tragédie des survivants atteints par ce qu’elle appelle « la maladie de la guerre ». Ce livre étudie, entre autres, la spécificité des textes de Langfus. Ecrits à une époque où prévalait l’ethos de la victimisation, de la repentance et parfois du manichéisme, ils nous invitent à tenir à distance toute idéalisation ou fausse consolation.

Anna Langfus participated in a major renewal of Holocaust literature which had been mainly testimonial and witness-focused prior to her publications. She is the author of theater plays and of three novels: Le Sel et le soufre (1960), Les Bagages de sable (1962), awarded with the Prix Goncourt, and Saute, Barbara (1965). She experienced the horrors of the Holocaust, but she refused to express her grief through autobiography. Through her work she explores, without pathos, the tragedy of those who survived, and what Anna Langfus herself calls “la maladie de la guerre”: the war disease. This books examines, among other issues, the specificity of Langfus’s texts. Written at a time when an ethos of victimization, repentance, and sometimes Manichaeism was dominant, Langfus’s they urge us to keep any form of idealization or false consolation at a distance.
Volume Editors: and
Contests over heritage in Asia are intensifying and reflect the growing prominence of political and social disputes over historical narratives shaping heritage sites and practices, and the meanings attached to them. These contests emphasize that heritage is a means of narrating the past that demarcates, constitutes, produces, and polices political and social borders in the present. In its spaces, varied intersections of actors, networks, and scales of governance interact, negotiate and compete, resulting in heritage sites that are cut through by borders of memory.

This volume, edited by Edward Boyle and Steven Ivings, and with contributions from scholars across the humanities, history, social sciences, and Asian studies, interrogates how particular actors and narratives make heritage and how borders of memory shape the sites they produce.
In Communes and Conflict, Jan Dumolyn and Jelle Haemers explore the urban rebellions that regularly erupted in Flanders between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. They analyse not only how these rebellions were sparked and repressed, but also how they shaped the culture and identity of Flemish townspeople. Drawing from a wide range of theoretical methods and concepts, including those of discourse analysis, semiotics, speech acts, collective memory and material cultural studies, the authors return to key Marxist questions on ideology, labour and class interest to map the perspectives of the rebels, the urban patriciate and the Flemish and Burgundian nobility.
Voices from the Sidelines
Volume Editors: and
This volume focuses on acts of courage, defiance, and sacrifice undertaken during World War I and II by individuals that mainstream history has relegated to the sidelines. Drawn from different genres – literary, cinematic, diaristic and historical – the experiences that these ‘outsiders’ confronted lay bare the intimate, if lacerating, choices that they faced in their struggle for freedom. Ignored by official history, the testimonials that war prisoners, female partisan leaders, spies, deserters, and disillusioned soldiers offer, provide a fresh insight into the social, political, historical, and ethical contradictions that define warfare rhetoric in the twentieth century. The book’s ten contributors delve into the conflicts between oppressive authorities and the desire for freedom. With verve and energy, they revive these largely neglected voices and turn them into a provocative medium to discuss, and redefine, issues still relevant today: heroism, pacifism, national pride, gender issues, faith, personal and collective history.
Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries
Memory and Commemoration across Central Asia: Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries is a collection of fourteen studies by a group of scholars active in the field of Central Asian Studies, presenting new research into various aspects of the rich cultural heritage of Central Asia (including Afghanistan). By mapping and exploring the interaction between political, ideological, literary and artistic production in Central Asia, the contributors offer a wide range of perspectives on the practice and usage of historical and religious commemoration in different contexts and timeframes. Making use of different approaches – historical, literary, anthropological, or critical heritage studies, the contributors show how memory functions as a fundamental constituent of identity formation in both past and present, and how this has informed perceptions in and outside Central Asia today.
In this book, Marileen La Haije offers a thorough and innovative analysis of the intersections between madness and trauma in recent Central American literature on (post)war. A central argument of her study is that these literary texts challenge the taboo of madness in Latin American contexts of memory, by showing that talking about madness does not necessarily lead to stigmatizing victims of political violence or disqualifying their stories about traumatic experiences. La Haije highlights the importance of including madness on the research agenda in the field of memory studies in Latin America.

En este libro, Marileen La Haije presenta un análisis detallado e innovador de las intersecciones entre locura y trauma en la ficción centroamericana reciente sobre la (pos)guerra. Un argumento central de su estudio es que estos textos literarios desafían el tabú de la locura en los contextos de memoria latinoamericanos, enseñándonos que hablar de locura no necesariamente implica estigmatizar a víctimas de violencia política o descalificar sus relatos sobre experiencias traumáticas. La Haije destaca la importancia de incluir la locura como tema de investigación en los estudios sobre la memoria en Latinoamérica.