Editor: Katrine Wong
Eastern and Western Synergies and Imaginations: Texts and Histories is a product of east-west studies crossed with adaptation studies: it goes beyond evaluation of cultural interactions and discussion of forms and manners of adaptation. This volume brings together critical discourses from various cultural locales which have developed from and thrived on the notion of “East meets West” or “West meets East”. The 10 chapters trace and investigate cross-, trans- or multi-cultural interpretations of fictional and non-fictional narratives that feature people and events in cities and regions which thrive, or have thrived, as East-West hubs, thereby expounding multiple layers of relationship between source texts and new texts. An allegorical play, The Three Ladies of Macao, premièred in December 2016, is now published as appendix in this volume.
Disability and Dissensus is a comprehensive collection of essays that reflects the interdisciplinary nature of critical cultural disability studies. The volume offers a selection of texts by numerous specialists in different areas of the humanities, both well-established scholars and young academics, as well as practitioners and activists from the USA, the UK, Poland, Ireland, and Greece. Taking inspiration from Critical Disability Studies and Jacques Rancière’s philosophy, the book critically engages with the changing modes of disability representation in contemporary cultures. It sheds light both on inspirations and continuities as well as tensions and conflicts within contemporary disability studies, fostering new understandings of human diversity and contributing to a dissensual ferment of thought in the academia, arts, and activism.

Contributors are: Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Dan Goodley, Marek Mackiewicz-Ziccardi, Małgorzata Sugiera, David T. Mitchell, Sharon L. Snyder, Maria Tsakiri, Murray K. Simpson, James Casey, Agnieszka Izdebska, Edyta Lorek-Jezińska, Dorota Krzemińska, Jolanta Rzeźnicka-Krupa, Wiktoria Siedlecka-Dorosz, Katarzyna Ojrzyńska, Christian O’Reilly, and Len Collin.
Social Dynamics of Turbulent Theatrical Events
Since the beginning of theatre history, scandals have taken place and the variety of causes, processes and types of interactions makes them an interesting object of study. Theatre scandals often indicate clashes with a dominant ideology or with the ideology of a particular group in society. Sometimes, following a scandal, the attacked ideology changes and incorporates the possibility of the aesthetics or themes that caused the clash. In this way, scandals can cause dynamic changes within cultural systems.
Next to theoretical considerations the contributors, all members of the IFTR Theatrical Event Working Group, present in their various case studies a wide cultural and chronological diversity of theatre scandals, all of which were experienced as very shocking moments in theatre history.
Discoveries in a Dance Theatre Lab Through Creative Process-based Research
In Expressive Arts Education and Therapy the reader follows the creation of art-making in tandem with the unfolding of sense-making. A dance theatre lab is the stage for exploration where what was discovered was phenomenologically and collaboratively reflected upon, the participatory nature of the creative work pouring into the research methodology. Creative Process-based Research efficacy is contingent upon the interaction of three poles – the creator, the product and an experience of the internal/external creative process of the creator. All three perspectives comprise the dynamics required of this research methodology in order to understand what is occurring in these three distinct and essential elements of the creative process. What results is an experience of cohesion that consciously describes this interplay.

The author outlines his influences that contributed to both the art-making and sense-making over the seven year research project. His work in experimental theatre in New York, as an educator with The European Graduate School in Switzerland and his studies with philosopher John de Ruiter in Canada are integrated into the world of research in the field of expressive arts. The visceral component of creating clarity is uncovered and articulated. This book inspires new ways of thinking about participatory, collaborative, arts-centered research where the skill of exposing the artist/researcher’s modus operandi for making art and making sense is named in a myriad of ways that call upon the intellect as well as the artist’s intuitive sense of what to focus on and its relevance to education, therapy and global health.
Joyce’s art is an art of idiosyncratic transformation, revision and recycling. More specifically, the work of his art lies in the act of creative transformation: the art of the paste that echoes Ezra Pound’s urge to make it new. The essays in this volume examine various modalities of the Joycean aesthetic metamorphosis: be it through the prism of Joyce engaging with other arts and artists, or through the prism of other arts and artists engaging with the Joycean aftermath. We have chosen the essays that best show the range of Joycean engagement with multiple artistic domains in a variety of media. Joyce’s art is multiform and protean: influenced by many, it influences many others.

Abstract

Recent critical advances in the field of Word and Music Studies have drawn attention to the role of the reader in the process of “activating” the “Musical Novel”. The score-like qualities of Finnegans Wake are not designed for mere sight-reading, and instead require a literary equivalent of what is referred to as “audiation” in musicology. I suggest here that the Wake demands to be read in a fashion analogous to the way a musician audiates a polyphonic musical score. Performing the Wake’s musical score fragment “silently” within our mind, is a gateway to the manner in which we might read the entirety of the book. This practice can be called “literary audiation”, and it paves an exciting avenue to approach Joyce’s complex text. Here we come at odds with Joyce’s own claim that to understand his texts, we should read them aloud. In fact, reading them aloud requires a sequence of choices, closing down the democratic and multifaceted aspect of Joyce’s texts. Alternatively, the silent world of “inner hearing” does not demand such choices and so is, in fact, the ideal site for the performance of these words. This sort of audiated reading should not be restricted to overtly musical sections; it is a way of experiencing the text in general.

In: James Joyce and the Arts

Abstract

Joyce regarded the Insular period – from the advent of Patrician Christianity to the Coming of the Normans – as a golden age during which the Irish exerted intellectual influence over Britain and across the Continent. This was due principally to the custom of peregrinatio (spiritual exile) in the manner of Colum Cille, a prince of the Uí Néill dynasty who would become Columba of Iona, founding a monastery on this remote island of the Inner Hebrides in 566 ad, according to the dating accepted in Joyce’s lifetime. Yet, Colum Cille’s spiritual exile was driven by a phosphorescent thirst for knowledge, an assured sense of his superiority in terms of intellect and ancestry, and the first copyright case in recorded history. These are just some of the parallels Joyce consciously fashions between his various personas in Finnegans Wake and Colum Cille. This chapter examines the Columban legacy in Finnegans Wake, especially the “calligraphy expertise” chapter, providing a codicological analysis of the letter unearthed by Biddy the Hen. This analysis is illuminated by Joyce’s engagement with the Book of Kells, traditionally attributed to Colum Cille, though this is a historical impossibility, but also examines his fascination with the first book ascribed to Colum Cille: the “Cathach battler” (vi.B.6.184; vi.C.3.47).

In: James Joyce and the Arts
Author: John Morey

Abstract

In “‘Sirens’ after Schoenberg”, David Herman identifies in the eleventh episode of Ulysses an alignment, not with fugue as per the standard critical model, but with dodecaphony. In this paper I employ an anti-able-normative rationale to demonstrate how in Finnegans Wake, Joyce, as an experimenter with the latent sonics of written language, made comparable decisions as to what to discard and what to retain of Classical and Romantic aesthetic orthodoxies as Schoenberg had in developing serialism. As Herman illustrates, the Schoenbergian and Joycean projects each emphasised “structuration” as a generative device. Key both to Herman’s and to the present thesis is the concept of the “combinatory apparatus”. A combinatory apparatus is a syntactic technique for ordering elements within a system. Those elements may be numbers, words and letters, colours, basic factors in logic, or any other small transposable units. Taking Herman’s conception of the “well-formed” in modernist art as a starting point, I offer here a parallel reading of the deformative and malfunctional structuration of Finnegans Wake and of twelve-tone music. In his essay, Herman uses the term “well-formed” five times. In five numbered sections I address in order each of these usages, applying them to Finnegans Wake and to dodecaphony with particular attention to the radio announcement sequence of FW ii.3. My methodology differs from Herman’s in that it is musico-aesthetic more than linguistic, emphasising the disablist aesthetics of both Schoenberg’s twelve-tone technique and Joyce’s literary contrapuntalism. Nevertheless, Herman’s identification of syntax rather than any strictly musical paradigm as the key factor in the formation of “Sirens” is adapted here to the study of the – I argue – even more musical construction of Finnegans Wake.

In: James Joyce and the Arts
In: James Joyce and the Arts

Abstract

The heretofore unknown level of reality that we perceive in Joyce’s works partly owes to the fact that the writer makes active and positive use of his characters’ failings. He programmatically explores the gap between what one person says and what another understands and employs this insight to construct his writings, as well as an ethics of and in his work. This chapter first asks why it is important that Joyce embraces mistakes as portals of discovery, what kinds of mistakes may be meant, and then turns to artists who have taken up such an understanding in their works. I turn to Eco (open work), Senn (dislocution) and Maharaj (perfidious fidelity) to theorise the matter in relation to Joyce. This artistic and theoretical material together enables me to use Wollaeger’s argument on the social function of reading Joyce, as well as Social Science scholarship (Boltanski) on who in society is permitted to interpret freely and make mistakes. I will lastly turn to scholarship on unintended negative consequences, in order to make a case for an indirect social efficacy of art (history) and Joyce’s work in our mistake-adverse world.

In: James Joyce and the Arts