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Race and Racism in Post-apartheid South Africa
Paradise Lost. Race and Racism in Post-apartheid South Africa is about the continuing salience of race and persistence of racism in post-apartheid South Africa. The chapters in the volume illustrate the multiple ways in which race and racism are manifested and propose various strategies to confront racial inequality, racism and the power structure that underpins it, while exploring, how, through a renewed commitment to a non-racial society, apartheid racial categories can be put under erasure at exactly the time they are being reinforced.
How the Education System Reacted to the First Wave of Covid-19
The nine chapters in this book explore how the Italian education system responded to distance learning during the first wave of the pandemic. The impact of the hard lockdown on both teaching and learning revealed the inherent weaknesses of a system in which digital technology had only recently been introduced and highlighted the relevant inequalities in their access and use. While students, teachers and families adapted (albeit with difficulty) to the new learning and teaching routines, the institutions faced the challenge of ensuring quality and equality.

By including various case studies and unedited sets of data collected in different areas of the country, the book offers up-to-date insights on the impact of the pandemic on the Italian school system and provides a broad introduction to the educational emergency from a sociological perspective. The volume ends with a post-commentary comparing the Italian case with the similar situation of school closure as it occurred in the United Kingdom.

Contributors are: Paolo Barabanti, Eduardo Barberis, Nico Bazzoli, Rita Bertozzi, Stefania Capogna, Gianna Cappello, Domenico Carbone, Maddalena Colombo, Joselle Dagnes, Maria Chiara De Angelis, Maurizio Merico, Diego Mesa, Flaminia Musella, Francesco Ramella, Marco Romito, Michele Rostan, Mariagrazia Santagati, Tatiana Saruis, Fausta Scardigno, Spyros Themelis, Massimiliano Vaira and Martina Visentin.
Digitalisation, Quality and Trust in Higher Education
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated change in the higher education sector across the globe and has required huge efforts and commitments on the political, institutional and individual level. During this period higher education was considered, maybe more than ever, as an essential sector. Providing critical information and, contributing to the delivery of scientifically based solutions to help societies overcome this global crisis, universities also simultaneously maintained core educational activities to secure the academic future of the next student generation. This required a high level of innovation, adaptivity and creativity. The book is centred on three main themes linked to transformation and change in higher education: digitalisation, quality and trust. The transformative power of the pandemic has raised concerns and questions of each of them.

Contributors are: Stephanie Albrecht, Tony Armstrong, Victoria Birmingham, Victor Borden, Bruno Broucker, Uwe Cantner, Helge Dauchert, Harry de Boer, Caterina Fox, Amanda French, Katharina Hölzle, Gunnar Grepperud, Seonmi Jin, Ben Jongbloed, Alex Kendall, Cindy Konen, René Krempkow, Anne-Kristin Langner, Theodor Leiber, Oddlaug Marie Lindgaard, Silke Masson, Clare Milsom, Jessica Nooij, Mark O’Hara, Matt O’Leary, Pascale Stephanie Petri, Rosalind Pritchard, Christopher Stolz, Elisabeth Suzen, Sara-I. Täger, Daniel Thiemann, Lieke van Berlo, Lotte J. van Dijk, Katy Vigurs, Tilo Wendler, and Tamara Zajontz.
Developing teacher education policies calls for a collaborative dialogue of teacher educators, student teachers, researchers, teachers, school heads and school boards, as well as policy makers at regional, national and European levels. The Teacher Education Policy in Europe Scientific Network (TEPE Network) focuses on improving the quality of teacher education in Europe. This aim is reached through careful comparison and analysis of teacher education practices in Europe, sharing of existing practices and outcomes of research on teacher education, and by discussing the implications of these outcomes for teacher education policies at faculty, institutional, regional, national and European level. Key Issues in Teacher Education: Policy, Research and Practice is a series of scholarly texts that inspires and facilitates this dialogue regarding teacher education as an ongoing process of professional development within the continuum of the teaching profession, from initial teacher education, through induction and on to continuing professional development throughout teacher careers. Such teacher education aims to support prospective, novice and experienced teachers to develop their professional capability in fostering the individual and collective learning needs of pupils and in creating and strengthening learning environments and school environments that are inclusive and democratic, that aim at equity and that are exemplary for an inclusive and democratic society. The coherence of the TEPE series is created by a common focus of each volume that is characterized by: • A comparative European (international) perspective cherishing diversity in perspectives and viewpoints; • Addressing the continuum of teacher education; • Bridging research, practice and policy; • With a focus on the implications for local, national or international policies, practices and research. Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Series Editors, Maria Assunção Flores, Joanna Madalińska-Michalak, and Marco Snoek.
Series Editors: Bronwen Cowie and Michael A. Peters
Partnerships and collaboration are two ideas that have transformed teacher education and enhanced teacher professional learning, enquiry and research. Increasingly, the changing context in which teachers work requires them to continually update and enhance their knowledge and skills, and to engage in different forms of professional development in order to understand the needs of their pupils and the communities they come from. This underlines the need for stronger partnerships to connect teachers with each other, with teacher education providers, with local communities, with local government, and with business and National Government Organizations (NGOs). Educational partnerships as a concept recognises the new ecology of digital interconnectivity, the need for stronger collaboration at all levels, and a new collective responsibility for education. Partnerships in the form of transnational education, public-private collaborations, interactions between formal and informal educational organisations, collaborations between tertiary organisations and industry/the service sector and amongst schools and between schools and their communities have emerged as strong policy and practice drivers. This series aims to span this broad understanding of partnership and make a contribution to both theory and practice.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to the Aquisitions Editor, John Bennett.
Series Editors: D.W. Livingstone and David Guile
It has been recognised since Adam Smith and Karl Marx’s pioneering work that the best way to understand any economy is to study the most advanced practices of production. For some time, the most innovative economic vanguard has been referred to globally as the knowledge economy – a term that now also encompasses developments in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Originally, a consensus formed among policymakers that the knowledge economy is a global reality to which all individuals and societies must adjust, and that lifelong learning is the optimal strategy to secure such an adjustment. Currently, this consensus is leading to scare stories about the ‘end of work’ and lifelong learning being repositioned as the strategy to assist people to live ‘creative’ lives.

The aim of The Knowledge Economy and Education book series is therefore to provide a focus for writers and readers interested in exploring the relationship between changes in the knowledge economy and learning practices, or an aspect of that relationship: for example, vocational, professional and workplace learning theorised critically.

The series seeks authors who are keen to question, conceptually and empirically, the hidden nature of the knowledge economy as well as the causal link that policymakers globally assume exists between education and the knowledge economy by raising: (i) epistemological issues as regards the concepts of, production of, and the relations between knowledge, the knowledge economy and education; (ii) sociological and political economic issues as regards the changing nature of work, technology (including AI), learning, and possible alternative visions of what a knowledge economy/knowledge society might look like; and (iii) the contribution education, communities, and workplaces could make to realising those visions.

The series is particularly aimed at researchers, policymakers, practitioners and students since it hopes to stimulate debate amongst this diverse audience by publishing books that (i) articulate alternative visions of the relation between education and the knowledge economy, (ii) offer new insights into the extent, modes, and effectiveness of the forms of knowledge and learning (including the development of AI) that people in the developed and developing world will need to respond to, and (iii) suggest how changes in both work conditions, curriculum and pedagogy can spur fresh thinking about the relation between work and learning.
Author: Peter Roberts
This book provides a distinctive perspective on some of the ways in which performativity, as an expression of neoliberal and managerialist thinking, ‘works’ in specific policy contexts. It pays particular attention to higher education and considers how the logic of performativity reconfigures our sense of what it means to engage in worthwhile research, what it means to be ‘well’, and, ultimately, what it means to be human.

Philosophy of education, conceived not just as a domain of scholarly activity but as a way of life, rubs against the grain of performativity. In a performance-driven world, efficiency, measurability and predictability are all important. A philosophical life in education is often unpredictable, uncertain and ‘inefficient’; it creates a kind of intellectual restlessness that can never be fully satisfied.

Performativity, Politics and Education: From Policy to Philosophy suggests that the current obsession with productivity, performance and prosperity is misguided. It argues that policies and practices underpinned by the principle of performativity are dehumanising and offers an alternative approach: an orientation to education grounded in a philosophy of hope and underpinned by a commitment to collegiality, constructive critique and ongoing dialogue.
This volume provides an exciting introduction to social wellbeing and different epistemological standpoints. Targeted at researchers, students, academics, policy makers, practitioners and activists, the volume allows stakeholders to collectively problematise and address marginalised populations’ social wellbeing, providing perspectives and applications from various disciplines such as education, health, public policy and social welfare. Chapters continue to debate social wellbeing within their disciplines, and challenges practitioners’ and researchers’ experience, particularly interactions between individual and social aspects of wellbeing. Contributors provide practical and academic discussions, drawing upon different cultural, historical, political and social paradigms, putting forward available empirical data.

Contributors are: Andrew Azzopardi, Amanda Bezzina, Trevor Calafato, Joanne Cassar, Marlene Cauchi, Carmel Cefai, Marilyn Clark, Maureen Cole, Katya De Giovanni, Melanie E. Demarco, Andreana Dibben, Ruth Falzon, Marvin Formosa, Natalie Kenely, Dione Mifsud, Brenda Murphy, Claudia Psaila, Sandra Scicluna, Anabel Scolaro, Miriam Teuma, Anna Maria Vella, Sue Vella and Carla Willing,
Volume Editors: Rosemary Sage and Riccarda Matteucci
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Education was established to create employees for 19th and 20th century manufacturing models. The 21st century requires a rethink. Change is happening fast, with jobs not guaranteed as robots are taking over routines. We must prepare students for uncertainty & higher-level employment – helping them think and communicate instead of retain and recall facts for passing exams. Some curricula is either irrelevant for today or gained at the press of a button. Listening and literate talk (narratives) for collaboratively solving real problems should be the focus, not facts forgotten after tests. The book explores this important debate.

Contributors are: Daryle Abrahams, Nigel Adams, Peter Chatterton, Stefano Cobello, Joanna Ebner, Pierre Frath, Irene Glendinning, Susan James, Riccarda Matteucci, Gloria McGregor, Elena Milli, Elizabeth Negus, Juan Eduardo Romero, Rosemary Sage and Emma Webster.
This edited volume concerns Higher Education and the aftermaths of the COVID-19 pandemic. It comprises a wide reflection on the impact of the public health crisis derived from the COVID-19 pandemic on Higher Education and addresses the main question: what will it be like from now on? The collection includes a range of theoretical and methodological approaches highlighting conceptual, contextual and cultural issues; thus the chapters are of rather diverse types, including theoretical essays, exemplary case studies, reports from around the world describing concrete intervention projects, and studies in a wide range of disciplines.

Contributors are: Susan Beltman, Dana Crăciun, Morena Cuconato, Weimin Delcroix-Tang, Brigid Freeman, Susana Gonçalves, Tina Hascher, Marta Ilardo, Dong Kwang Kim, Vadim Kozlov, Beatrix Kreß, Pete Leihy, Elena Levina, Elena Luppi, Suzanne Majhanovich, Chenicheri Sid Nair, Monica Oprescu, Nilüfer Pembecioğlu, Allan Pitman, Aurora Ricci, Rachel Sheffield, Upasana Singh, Ian Teo, Tatiana Tregubova, Rashmi Watson and Pete Woodcock.