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L’écolâtre cathédral en France septentrionale du ixe au xiiie siècle
Author: Thierry Kouamé
This book traces the history of one of the central actors in the transformation of the Western educational system between the 9th and 13th centuries: the cathedral schoolmaster. Originally responsible for running the episcopal school, this ecclesiastical official eventually became a true school administrator with a territorial monopoly and coercive powers, including in particular issuing ‘licentia docendi’ to masters under his jurisdiction. Using a wide range of sources and taking in thirty-nine dioceses in northern France, the study analyses the construction of the office from the Carolingian period, the place of the schoolmaster within the canonical community and in feudal society, and the institutionalisation of his function with the Gregorian Reform and the birth of universities.
Author: Nancy A. Wasser
“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many of them claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, the author argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

The author explains how teaching and regular practicing of how to write from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in the U.S. curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to a more equal society in which both teachers and children have a voice.
Volume Editors: Annica Andersson and Richard Barwell
There is no shortage of urgent, complex problems that mathematics education can and should engage with. Pandemics, forest fires, pollution, Black Lives Matter protests, and fake news all involve mathematics, are matters of life and death, have a clear political dimension, and are interdisciplinary in nature. They demand a critical approach. The authors in this volume showcase new insights, teaching ideas and new and unique ways of applying critical mathematics education, in areas as diverse as climate change, obesity, decolonisation and ethnomathematics. This book demonstrates that there is plenty to be done with critical mathematics education.

Contributors are: Annica Andersson, Tonya Gau Bartell, Richard Barwell, Lisa Lunney Borden, Sunghwan Byun, Anna Chronaki, Brian Greer, Jennifer Hall, Victoria Hand, Kjellrun Hiis Hauge, Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Rune Herheim, Courtney Koestler, Kate le Roux, Swapna Mukhopadhyay, Aldo Parra, Anita Rampal, Sheena Rughubar-Reddy, Toril Eskeland Rangnes, Ulrika Ryan, Lisa Steffensen, Paola Valero and David Wagner.
A Critical Review for Educators, Librarians, Families, Researchers & Writers
This enriched reference guide offers a unique overview of more than 200 picture books published by Canadian publishing houses between 2017–2019. The authors cover key themes in contemporary Canadian titles that match broad curriculum trends in education. Response activities are included in the text, for example frameworks for critical literacy discussions, along with annotated bibliographies that specifically recognize titles by Indigenous authors and illustrators. The book also contains original interviews with a dozen rising stars in Canadian writing and book illustration. While the book is specifically geared for educators, it also supports public libraries, Education researchers, and future picture book creators, as well as families who are interested in learning more about reading development and related literacy activities for the home setting.
Teachers in schools nowadays are challenged to create inclusive learning environments and safe spaces for encountering diversity in values, cultures and religions, as well as in (dis)ability and talent. Classrooms are micro-cosmoses in which local and global issues are confronted and addressed.

This volume discusses the characteristics of good teachers and the teaching that is needed in today’s and tomorrow’s schools. The focus is on research-based perspectives, with contributions from several internationally renowned scholars on what constitutes good and quality in teaching-studying-learning processes. The chapters focus on good teaching and good teachers from perspectives concerning the fundamental and transversal features of what constitutes a good teacher. More specifically, it is argued that good teachers in tomorrow’s schools will need capabilities that reflect the purpose of education, values in education, and talent in education.

As an outcome, the book provides insights into how, in attending not only to the cognitive but also to the affective, behavioral, moral and spiritual domains, teachers are able to support holistic growth and learning among their students in schools of the 21st century. This volume discusses good teaching for schools in the future from the perspectives of school pedagogy, educational psychology, and neuropsychology.
This volume addresses a gap in previous research and explores Nordic textbooks chronologically and empirically from the Protestant Reformation to our present time. The chapters are written by scholars from universities in Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, countries that distinguish themselves with a rich tradition of textbook research. The authors represent different academic traditions and use a wide range of scholarly methods and perspectives. The overall objective is to highlight how textbooks reflect national cultural politics and legislation. The various chapters cast light on how textbooks are integrated in national politics and demonstrate how they have contributed to nation-building and to strengthening the nations’ core values and other major political projects.

Contributors are: Karl Christian Alvestad, Norunn Askeland, Kjell Lars Berge, Peter Bernhardsson, Kerstin Bornholdt, Mads B. Claudi, Henrik Edgren, Morten Fink-Jensen, Stig Toke Gissel, Thomas Illum Hansen, Pirjo Hiidenmaa, Marthe Hommerstad, Axel Hörstedt, Kari-Anne Jørgensen-Vittersø, Tujia Laine, Esbjörn Larsson, Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund, Christina Matthiesen, Eva Maagerø, Tuva Skjelbred Nodeland, Kari H. Nordberg, Merethe Roos, Henriette Hogga Siljan, Johan Laurits Tønnesson and Janne Varjo.
30 Years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in Action towards Sustainability
This book investigates and uncover paradoxes and ambivalences that are actualised when seeking to make the right choices in the best interests of the child. The 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established a milestone for the 20th century. Many of these ideas still stand, but time calls for new reflections, empirical descriptions and knowledge as provided in this book.

Special attention is directed to the conceptualisation of children and childhood cultures, the missing voices of infants and fragile children, as well as transformations during times of globalisation and change. All chapters contribute to understand and discuss aspects of societal demands and cultural conditions for modern-day children age 0–18, accompanied by pointers to their future.

Contributors are: Eli Kristin Aadland, Wenche Bjorbækmo, Jorunn Spord Borgen, Gunn Helene Engelsrud, Kristin Vindhol Evensen, Eldbjørg Fossgard, Liv Torunn Grindheim, Asle Holthe, Liisa Karlsson, Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager, Jonatan Leer, Ida Marie Lyså, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Czarecah Tuppil Oropilla, Susanne Højlund Pedersen, Anja Maria Pesch, Karen Klitgaard Povlsen, Gro Rugseth, Pauline von Bonsdorff, Hege Wergedahl and Susanne C. Ylönen.
The educational world is experiencing exciting yet tension-filled times. We all wish to strengthen and support creativity and creative teaching in schools. Yet recent debates about what “creativity” means, and how it should be implemented, raise the need for more specific approaches. Write a Science Opera (WASO) is one such approach. WASO is a transdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach to teaching at the intersection of art and science in schools. It is all about creative teaching and teaching for creativity.

Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guidebook to Writing a Science Opera provides teachers with the reasons for, and advantages of, introducing pupils of all ages to WASO. It provides step-by-step instructions for how to implement WASO in classrooms. WASO is challenging, but the rewards are powerful: In WASO, it is the pupils’ curiosity and creative imagination which develop their science and art curriculum.

Get ready for an exciting, creative journey …
Author: Ligia Pelosi
The Joy Principle is a fictionalised novel about teachers and teaching in neoliberal times. It addresses the themes of teacher agency within a context of critical and creative praxis. The story centres on Alex, a graduate teacher who decides to disrupt the mandated pedagogical practices of literacy education. As an agent of transformative change, Alex provides an examination of how children learn best and how teachers can re-author themselves in their work within the constraints of contemporary practice. The novel is accompanied by a commentary on arts-based, narrative fiction as research.
We live in a time of unprecedented media use, much of which can be accessed by devices that fit in our pockets. Young people, in particular, make use of media on a near-constant basis. How can this media use be better understood?

This text focuses on the scholarship and research of David Buckingham, a global leader in media literacy education and children’s and young people’s media cultures. It is not an exaggeration to state that studies and applications of media literacy education around the globe are indebted to the scholarship of Buckingham and that more nuanced understandings of how children and young people make sense of their media choices are due, in large part, to Buckingham’s work.

Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham focuses on the key contributions of Buckingham’s work over his prolific career, illuminating the advances he made in the field of media literacy education and understandings of young people’s media cultures. Through a close look at Buckingham’s theoretical advancements, contributions to the larger field of media literacy education, and the key strains of his research – how children and young people learn, what they already know about media and pop culture before they enter classrooms, end media content about and for youth – this text delineates Buckingham’s vast bibliography and will be an invaluable resource for anyone curious to know more about children, youth, and media literacy education.

Analysis of Buckingham’s work is drawn from his robust bibliography, exploration of scholarship he has critiqued, interpretation of contemporary social concerns through the lens of his research, and formal and informal conversations with him over the course of several years.