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Author: Pratik Chougule
The drive to promote American-style higher education is among the most longstanding and enduring features of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Since its earliest engagements in the region, the U.S. government has looked to American universities to promote Washington’s interests and values. This book analyzes how American universities in the Middle East relate to U.S. foreign policy and how this relationship has evolved amid shifting U.S. priorities through two world wars, the Cold War, and the War on Terrorism. American Universities in the Middle East and U.S. Foreign Policy focuses on four sets of case studies: (1) The American University of Beirut; (2) The American University in Cairo; (3) American universities in Afghanistan and Iraq; and (4) Education City in Qatar

At a time when policymakers are litigating core tenets of U.S. Middle East policy and new actors are entering the region’s higher education space, this book provides a resource to understand the geopolitical role of American universities in the Middle East.
Cross-National Perspectives on the Challenges and Management of Higher Education in Crisis Times
COVID-19 caused massive disruptions in the higher education sector across the world. The transition to online learning exposed the deep-rooted inequalities between countries, systems, institutions, and student groups in terms of the availability of information technology infrastructure, internet access and digital literacy, as well as prior training and experiences of faculty in online education. This volume explores various aspects of the impact of the pandemic on higher education management including how university administration responded to the crisis, and the role of local and national government agencies in academic support and higher education delivery. The key findings highlight the importance of better organisation and preparedness of higher education systems for future crises, and the need for a better dialogue between governments, higher education institutions and other stakeholders. The book calls for a collective response to address the digital divide among various groups and financial inequalities within and between the private and public universities, and to plan for the serious challenges that international students face during crisis situations.
Digitalisation, Quality and Trust in Higher Education
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated change in the higher education sector across the globe and has required huge efforts and commitments on the political, institutional and individual level. During this period higher education was considered, maybe more than ever, as an essential sector. Providing critical information and, contributing to the delivery of scientifically based solutions to help societies overcome this global crisis, universities also simultaneously maintained core educational activities to secure the academic future of the next student generation. This required a high level of innovation, adaptivity and creativity. The book is centred on three main themes linked to transformation and change in higher education: digitalisation, quality and trust. The transformative power of the pandemic has raised concerns and questions of each of them.

Contributors are: Stephanie Albrecht, Tony Armstrong, Victoria Birmingham, Victor Borden, Bruno Broucker, Uwe Cantner, Helge Dauchert, Harry de Boer, Caterina Fox, Amanda French, Katharina Hölzle, Gunnar Grepperud, Seonmi Jin, Ben Jongbloed, Alex Kendall, Cindy Konen, René Krempkow, Anne-Kristin Langner, Theodor Leiber, Oddlaug Marie Lindgaard, Silke Masson, Clare Milsom, Jessica Nooij, Mark O’Hara, Matt O’Leary, Pascale Stephanie Petri, Rosalind Pritchard, Christopher Stolz, Elisabeth Suzen, Sara-I. Täger, Daniel Thiemann, Lieke van Berlo, Lotte J. van Dijk, Katy Vigurs, Tilo Wendler, and Tamara Zajontz.
This book series focuses on the historical foundations and current transformations of African higher education. It is aimed at scholars, students, academic leaders, policy makers and key stakeholders both in Africa and around the world who have a strong interest in the progress, challenges and opportunities facing African higher education. A diversity of higher education themes and issues related to African higher education at institutional, national, regional and international levels are addressed. These include, but are not limited to, new developments and perspectives related to knowledge production and dissemination; the teaching/learning process; all forms of academic mobility – student, scholar, staff, program, provider and policy; funding mechanisms; pan-Africa regionalization; alternate models of higher education provision; university leadership, governance and management; gender issues; use of new technologies; equitable access; student success; Africanization of the curriculum, to name only a few critical issues.

A diversity of approaches to scholarship is welcomed including theoretical, conceptual, applied, and policy orientations. The notions of internationalization and harmonization of African higher education complements the cosmopolitan outlook of the series project through its comparative approach as critical imperatives. Finally, the book series is intended to attract both authors and readers, internal and external to Africa, all of whom are focused on African higher education including those doing comparative work on Africa with other regions of the world and the global South in particular.
Volume Editors: Julie Hansen and Ingela Nilsson
What does power abuse look and feel like in the academic world? How does it affect university faculty, students, education and research? What can we do to counteract and prevent power abuse? These questions are addressed in this collection of autobiographical poems, essays and illustrations about academia. The contributors reflect on individual experiences as well as underlying institutional structures, providing original perspectives on bullying, sexual harassment, discrimination, and other forms of power abuse in academic workplaces. They share their stories in order to break the culture of silence around power abuse in academia and point out pathways for constructive change.
Educational equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice are widely considered to be the most important civil rights challenge of the 21st century. Many HBCUs began in the 1800s as institutions to prepare Black teachers to teach in segregated America. Although their focus has expanded since their critical beginnings, HBCUs remain significant producers of African American teachers. Today, as the United States grapples with educational disparities, lack of diversity among education professionals, systemic racism, and the recent politically-inspired assaults on Critical Race Theory, we need HBCU leadership in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade education more than ever. Black College Leadership in PK–12 Education amplifies the research and perspectives of HBCU leaders, including four HBCU education deans, on how HBCUs help school districts optimize education for Black preschool, elementary and secondary students. Specific topics include HBCU teacher preparation, building HBCU and PK–12 partnerships, culturally responsive teaching, inclusive assessment practices, and HBCU leadership in STEM education. This book is ideal for school teachers and administrators who want to use HBCUs as a resource to improve education, as well as HBCU leaders who want to work more effectively with local school districts.
Series Editors: Michael A. Peters and Tina Besley
The knowledge, learning and creative economies manifest the changing significance of intellectual capital and the thickening connections between economic growth, knowledge and creativity. Increasingly economic and social activity is comprised by the ‘symbolic’ or ‘weightless’ economy with its iconic, immaterial and digital goods. This new digital knowledge economy includes new international labor that rely on developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) that are changing the format, density and nature of the exchange and flows of knowledge, research and scholarship. Delivery modes in education are being reshaped. New global cultures of knowledge and research networks are spreading rapidly. New forms of openness and networking, cross-border people movement, flows of capital, portal cities and intensive development zones all are changing the conditions of imagining and producing and the sharing of creative work in different spheres. At the centre of is the economy/creativity nexus. But are education systems, institutions, assumptions and habits positioned and able so as to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges? This new series investigates all the aspects of education in (and as) the creative economy in order to extend the dialogue about the relationship between contemporary higher education and the changing face of contemporary economies.
Series Editor: Joy Higgs
This series explores the current volatile context of higher education and examines ways that the higher education sector is responding to and driving these changes. The books in this series tackle challenges facing the sector and question the goals and strategies that researchers, educators and theorists are creating to address these challenges. They explore trends in stakeholder expectations, and evolving pedagogies and different horizons existing and emerging in higher education. The authors in this series bring a wealth of academic practice wisdom and experience to examine these issues. They share their practice knowledge, report research into strategies that address these challenges, and raise yet more questions. Through the conversations in this book readers can enter into the debates, visions and experiences of the agents of higher education.
Series Editors: Pedro Teixeira and Jussi Välimaa
This series provides overviews about state of the art research in the field of higher education studies. It documents a selection of papers from the annual conferences of the Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (CHER), the world organisation of researchers in the field of higher education. This object and problem related field of studies is by nature interdisciplinary and theoretically as well as methodologically informed by disciplines such as sociology, political science, economics, history, philosophy, law and education. Each book includes an introduction by the editors explaining the thematic approach and criteria for selection as well as how the book can be used by its possible audience which might include graduate students, policy makers, researchers in the field, and practitioners in higher education administration, leadership and management.

Please email queries to Pedro Teixeira: pedrotx@fep.up.pt
Series Editor: Jane Van Galen
Works in this Series will explore the complicated and shifting landscapes of wealth, opportunity, social class, and education in the changing global economic landscape, particularly at the intersections of race, ethnicity, religion, and gender. The Series includes work on education and social mobility within three major themes:
• Interrogation of stories of educational “success” against the odds for what these cases might teach about social class itself, about the depths of economic and educational constraints that have been surmounted, about the costs of those journeys, or about the long-term social and economic trajectories of class border crossers.
• Examination of the psycho-social processes by which people traverse class borders, including the social construction of ambition and achievement in young people marginalized from the academic mainstream by class, race, or gender. Works in the series will illuminate the complicated and contested processes of identity formation among those who attain upward mobility via success in school.
• Explorations of economic mobility within developing countries. New labor markets created by global consumerism are intensifying demand for formal education while also transforming individual lives, families, communities, and cultural practices. Meanwhile, high rates of migration in search of economic opportunity fuel debate about citizenship, assimilation, and identity as antecedents of economic mobility. How is formal education implicated in these processes?

Works are sought from the fields of sociology, anthropology, educational policy, economics, and political science. Methodologies may include longitudinal studies.