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The magical images and protest tools of Artemisia Gentileschi to Amanda Yates Garcia, also known as the Oracle of LA, are revealed in this book. Art Witches have created powerful images that resonate with beauty and activism, from Italian courtrooms in the 1500s to binding spells for the US Trump presidency in 2016.

For the first time, this book connects the genealogy of the image of the witch from historical to contemporary artists. It intertwines artistic purpose with social ills and equity issues and probes how this narrative is exposed and curated in museums and memorials focused on witchcraft.

The collection of images, artist interviews, and a case study of the two artists that make up Hilma’s Ghost provide recognition and a new context for this important and rapidly growing art movement.
Challenging Markets and Technology and Celebrating the Spirit of Education
Author:
Education is about human flourishing and explores meaning, purpose and values. As a holistic and integral practice for developing sustained attention and concentration, education is profoundly antithetical to the market and it is not a technological domain. The combination of markets and technology in the pursuit of efficiency destroys the potential of education to help societies nurture well-being. This book dives deeply into the overlapping crises of education today. The author draws on decades of experience and many disciplines to celebrate the spirit of education and to frame it as a gift.
Bildungsphilosophische Rekonstruktionen und erziehungswissenschaftliche Überlegungen
Author:
Ausgehend von der rekonstruktiven Frage, wie sich das Verhältnis von Glück und Pädagogik gestaltet, spürt der Band systematisch den Potenzialen nach, die eine Revitalisierung des Glückstopos für die Erziehungswissenschaft eröffnen kann. Als theoretischer Rückbezug dient der Capabilities Approach von Martha C. Nussbaum. Deutlich wird, dass weniger die Notwendigkeit einer neuen 'glücksorientierten Pädagogik' als vielmehr eine Diskussion darüber erforderlich zu sein scheint, dass die Pädagogik per se eine 'Pädagogik des Glücks' abbildet. Mögliche Weiterführungen dieses Gedankengangs werden auf aktuelle Bildungs- und Erziehungsverständnisse bezogen.
Contemporary art must get inspiration from somewhere. In Tea, Automatons, and Time Machines, the subculture of Steampunk art is studied in relation to art history. Addressing three main topics within social and environmental justice, a comparison of art styles and creativity stems from an artist’s passion within popular culture.

Using arts-based research methods and personal introspection viewed through the lens of nostalgia, a unique perspective of art history studies comes to life. Nostalgia, being primarily a psychological study, is used as a lens to view art, culture, and memoir into a complete research project.

We live in a world in need of change. Historically, artists have provided a means for change through their work and the lives they choose to live. The vastness of art history provides plenty of room for inspiration and interpretation. In this study, the contemporary sub-culture of Steampunk looks nostalgically at Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco eras in a way that paves the way for social change and environmental preservation using fantasy, cos-play, and art to demonstrate needed changes. Through the art and culture of Steampunk, we explore areas that could use improvement in our modern world, and yet, they do tie in with similar occurrences of the past. We find that we’re not that different but with art and demonstration, we too, can make positive changes for our future.
A View from the Inside (Second Edition)
What happens when a Canadian principal, guided by the teachings of Fullan and Hargreaves, takes on the role of school leader in an inner-city charter school in the United States? This inside story of a principal in the DC charter school system, reveals much about the desire for educators and students to experience more than a life of multiple-choice testing that tends to be so commonplace in these schools. While such a case adds to the mound of research that supports the ‘change takes time’ findings, it nevertheless demonstrates the reality, on a day-to-day basis, of what’s worth fighting for in schools. Student and teacher engagement and empowerment matter, and to get to such ends, a school must fiercely focus on targets well beyond test scores.
Closed Series
Cultural studies provides an analytical toolbox for both making sense of educational practice and extending the insights of educational professionals into their labors. In this context Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education provides a collection of books in the domain that specify this assertion. Crafted for an audience of teachers, teacher educators, scholars and students of cultural studies and others interested in cultural studies and pedagogy, the series documents both the possibilities of and the controversies surrounding the intersection of cultural studies and education. The editors and the authors of this series do not assume that the interaction of cultural studies and education devalues other types of knowledge and analytical forms. Rather the intersection of these knowledge disciplines offers a rejuvenating, optimistic, and positive perspective on education and educational institutions. Some might describe its contribution as democratic, emancipatory, and transformative.

The editors and authors maintain that cultural studies helps free educators from sterile, monolithic analyses that have for too long undermined efforts to think of educational practices by providing other words, new languages, and fresh metaphors. Operating in an interdisciplinary cosmos, Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education is dedicated to exploring the ways cultural studies enhances the study and practice of education. With this in mind the series focuses in a non-exclusive way on popular culture as well as other dimensions of cultural studies including social theory, social justice and positionality, cultural dimensions of technological innovation, new media and media literacy, new forms of oppression emerging in an electronic hyperreality, and postcolonial global concerns. With these concerns in mind cultural studies scholars often argue that the realm of popular culture is the most powerful educational force in contemporary culture. Indeed, in the twenty-first century this pedagogical dynamic is sweeping through the entire world. Educators, they believe, must understand these emerging realities in order to gain an important voice in the pedagogical conversation.

Without an understanding of cultural pedagogy's (education that takes place outside of formal schooling) role in the shaping of individual identity—youth identity in particular—the role educators play in the lives of their students will continue to fade. Why do so many of our students feel that life is incomprehensible and devoid of meaning? What does it mean, teachers wonder, when young people are unable to describe their moods, their affective affiliation to the society around them. Meanings provided young people by mainstream institutions often do little to help them deal with their affective complexity, their difficulty negotiating the rift between meaning and affect. School knowledge and educational expectations seem as anachronistic as a ditto machine, not that learning ways of rational thought and making sense of the world are unimportant.

But school knowledge and educational expectations often have little to offer students about making sense of the way they feel, the way their affective lives are shaped. In no way do we argue that analysis of the production of youth in an electronic mediated world demands some "touchy-feely" educational superficiality. What is needed in this context is a rigorous analysis of the interrelationship between pedagogy, popular culture, meaning making, and youth subjectivity. In an era marked by youth depression, violence, and suicide such insights become extremely important, even life saving. Pessimism about the future is the common sense of many contemporary youth with its concomitant feeling that no one can make a difference.

If affective production can be shaped to reflect these perspectives, then it can be reshaped to lay the groundwork for optimism, passionate commitment, and transformative educational and political activity. In these ways cultural studies adds a dimension to the work of education unfilled by any other sub-discipline. This is what Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education seeks to produce—literature on these issues that makes a difference. It seeks to publish studies that help those who work with young people, those individuals involved in the disciplines that study children and youth, and young people themselves improve their lives in these bizarre times.

This book series is dedicated to the radical love and actions of Paulo Freire, Jesus “Pato” Gomez, and Joe L. Kincheloe.
Through close examination of a set of educational works discovered among the Dunhuang manuscripts, this book presents new insights into the literary training undertaken by the elite of medieval China. In their contents and structures, these works tell us what parts of the literary and cultural inheritance the elite were expected to learn and how they learned them.
The material aspects of these manuscripts—including handwriting, copying errors, and paratextual additions—show how students in Dunhuang used and reproduced them. What emerges is a picture of a literary education that is more diverse in its sources, and also more haphazard, than previously imagined.