A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three aspects of education in Indonesia: teaching and teachers; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and education.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
Advcance Student-Scientist Partnerschips beyond the Status Quo
Author: Pei-Ling Hsu
Working with scientists has been suggested as a powerful activity that can stimulate students’ interest and career aspirations in science. However, how to address challenges of power-over issues and communication barriers in youth-scientist partnerships? In Youths’ Cogenerative Dialogues with Scientists, the author describes a pioneering study to improve internship communications between youth and scientists through cogenerative dialogues. The findings show that cogenerative dialogues can help youth and scientists recognize, express, and manage their challenges and emotions as they arise in their internships. As a result, cogenerative dialogues help youth and scientists work productively as a team and enhance their social boding. Suggestions are also provided for science educators to design more innovative and effective projects for future youth-scientist partnerships.
Child-Parent Research Reimagined challenges the field to explore the meaning making experiences and the methodological and ethical challenges that come to the fore when researchers engage in research with their child, grandchild, or other relative. As scholars in and beyond the field of education grapple with ways that youth make meaning with digital and nondigital resources and practices, this edited volume offers insights into nuanced learning that is highly contextualized and textured while also (re)initiating important methodological and epistemological conversations about research that seeks to flatten traditional hierarchies, honor youth voices, and co-investigate facets of youth meaning making.

Contributors are (in alphabetical order): Charlotte Abrams, Sandra Schamroth Abrams, Kathleen M. Alley, Bill Cope, Mary Kalantzis, Molly Kurpis, Linda Laidlaw, Guy Merchant, Daniel Ness, Eric Ness, "E." O’Keefe, Joanne O’Mara, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Sarah Prestridge, Lourdes M. Rivera, Dahlia Rivera-Larkin, Nora Rivera-Larkin, Alaina Roach O’Keefe, Mary Beth Schaefer, Cassandra R. Skrobot, and Bogum Yoon.

Abstract

Career development and school engagement are two concepts that have a significant impact on student outcomes. Research has indicated that addressing students’ career development can have a positive impact on helping prepare them for their futures. Research on engagement has demonstrated its importance in understanding and promoting student learning. A positive connection between career development and engagement also has been supported. Together, these two concepts can provide insights on how to help students become more successful. Using narrative inquiry, this study examines the experiences of two adolescent girls, 16-year-old Nora and 13-year-old Dahlia, as they examine their learning experiences in and out of school; what it means to be engaged in the learning process; and the connection to their career development. The data obtained were analyzed using an iterative process which resulted in the identification of two themes: School Learning as Restrictive and Boring and Engagement/Enjoyment. The lead author discusses the findings, and provides recommendations for educators. An examination of the ethical considerations when working with significant others is also provided.

In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined
In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined

Abstract

This chapter shares a parent-child interaction tied to autoethnographic research that used a co-operative inquiry approach—a way of working with someone who shares similar concepts and interests. Research is often thought of as something done on people, rather than with people. Instead of this traditional model, the authors discuss a shared exploration—a journey of inquiry—to better understand an anxiety disorder Cassandra developed during her late teens and early twenties. The researchers sought to make sense of their entwined relationship as parent and child, and to develop new and creative ways to look at what Cassandra was experiencing and how to improve her outcomes.

In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined

Abstract

In this final chapter, three adolescents provide a window into their experiences with and perspectives of their roles as co-researchers working with their parent-researcher. Three separately authored vignettes are part of the adolescents having “the last word,” reminding readers of the authenticity and empowerment in the critical self-reflection and insightful commentaries the teens share.

In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined
Author: Guy Merchant

Abstract

This chapter explores some of the ethical dilemmas of being both a researcher and a family member. Intrigued by the media play of his 7 year-old grandson but without the structure of a formal research project, the author constructs a series of analytical reflections that are filtered through his grandson’s plush toy, Iron Man. Iron Man is involved in a number of original media texts that re-work narratives from popular culture including episodes from Peppa Pig, Spongebob Squarepants, and Friends. The author shows how Iron Man (and his owner) are located in a complex media ecology. Being in the family offers unique opportunities for understanding the influences and experiences that give texture to this exploratory media play.

In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined
Author: Bogum Yoon

Abstract

When conducting parent-child research, it is important that parents as researchers continue to examine and reexamine the findings of their studies to better understand their children’s experiences in and beyond the classroom. This chapter discusses a parent-researcher’s retrospective examination of her findings using a different theoretical framework. It focuses on her children’s literacy experiences as immigrant English language learners in the United States. The parent-researcher’s detailed reanalysis process might provide a fuller picture of the adolescent immigrants’ complex literacy experiences. This study aims to offer insight into the manner by which reanalysis and reinterpretation of existing data with diverse theoretical frameworks can potentially shed light on improving the parent-child research method as an important form of qualitative inquiry and also deepen understanding of children’s learning experiences.

In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined

Abstract

Through an examination of how her tween son’s socially mediated life affects his educational perspectives, the author considers how this understanding informs and reforms current thinking about contemporary teaching and learning. In the age of social media and digital games, tweens are more engaged in what could be considered learning at home than they are in schools. What matters to the tween frames a new way of thinking about teaching and learning for both what these students need now and for their future work and learning practices. Emerging from this research are learning principles grounded in collaboration and communication in which tweens are contributors in all facets of teaching and learning.

In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined