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Volume Editors: and
In the last decade, programming and computational thinking (CT) have been introduced on a large scale in school curricula and standards all over the world. In countries such as the UK, a new school subject—computing—was created, whereas in countries such as Sweden, programming was included in existing subjects, notably mathematics and technology education. The introduction of programming and CT in technology education implies a particular relationship between programming and technology. Programming is usually performed with technological artefacts—various types of computers—and it can also be seen as a specific branch of engineering.

This book analyses the background to and current implementation of programming and computational thinking in a Swedish school technology context, in relation to international developments. The various chapters deal with pertinent issues in technology education and its relation to computers and computing, for example, computational thinking and literacy, teachers’ programming competence, and computational thinking, programming, and learning in technology education. The book includes examples from educational research that could also be used as inspiration for school teaching, teacher education and curriculum development.
Transforming Pedagogy alongside First Peoples of Remote Australia
Author:
First Peoples living in remote Australia are educated in two worlds. The future of bush food enterprises in outstations in Utopia depends on the successful transfer of intergenerational knowledge. High school girls respectfully inquire about how to harvest and process important cultural materials from country. Students, senior women and young men strengthen their connections to self, kinship and culture and share responsibility to care for country.

Careful collaboration with First Nations people creates opportunities to provide mathematics education which complements and is informed by the work that already exists in the local school community. Consultation with assistant teachers, students, and other community members creates opportunities to validate Indigenous pedagogies in mathematics education.

Decolonising Mathematics Education explores and responds to student interest in managing and harvesting akatyerr (desert raisin). Transforming pedagogy enables the students to respond more broadly to the needs of Utopia Eastern Anmatyerr and Alyawarr people to price and sell this important bush food. Income generated from the enterprise is modest, however the skills of a small start-up business have been applied to many learning opportunities that exist in the local community.
Volume Editor:
In this book, 31 international academics explore the concepts of gifted, talented, creative and dissimilar learners as they apply in both school and tertiary education. Problem-based learning, alternative educational settings and meaningful feedback for gifted, talented and high potential learners, teachers’ views on creative pedagogies, learning analytics for dissimilar learners, eMaking for learners with an intellectual disability, capabilities-led programs, learner agency and inclusive practices in mathematics education, form a unique nexus of theory, research and approaches being presented by the authors.

These chapters and the totality of this book represent efforts to get a glimpse into the future of the education of the gifted, talented, creative and dissimilar learners. If nothing else, this book underlines the value of powerful approaches and tools for educating 21st-century school learners as well as tertiary learners in the context of rapidly evolving global educational reforms.

Contributors are: Fatma Nur Aktaş, Tasos Barkatsas, Damian Blake, Antonios Bouras, Grant Cooper, Yüksel Dede, Kirsten Ellis, Zara Ersozlu, Aleryk Fricker, Vasilis Gialamas, Andrew Gilbert, Wendy Goff, Anne K. Horak, Gasangusein I. Ibragimov, Jennifer Jolly, Aliya A. Kalimullina, Gillian Kidman, Konstantinos Lavidas, Huk-Yuen Law, Sandra McKechnie, Patricia McLaughlin, Juanjo Mena, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Angela Rogers, Aimé Sacrez, Rachel Sheffield, Stefan Schutt, Hazel Tan, Kok-Sing Tang, Roza A. Valeeva and Wanty Widjaja.
Themes and Issues from an African Perspective
This book examines the Ethiopian higher education sector through an exploration of its various dimensions, challenges and prospects. Albeit one of the largest systems in the continent, the sector has received little research attention in the past. The book bridges this gap by marshalling a variety of current themes and issues with their wider implications for continental and global higher education. The chapters are structured in such a way that general readers, professionals and students of higher education can have a good grasp of the Ethiopian higher education sector as a microcosm of the African higher education ecosystem.
Volume Editors: and
In this book, 23 contributors offer new insights on key issues in mathematics education in early childhood. The chapters cover all mathematics curriculum-related issues in early childhood (number, geometry, patterns and structures and mathematics in daily life). Special attention is given to teachers knowledge and innovative research issues such as quantifiers among young children.

Contributors are: Abraham Arcavi, Ruthi Barkai, Douglas H. Clements, Bat-Sheva Eylon, Dina Hassidov, Rina Hershkowitz, Leah Ilani, Bat-Sheva Ilany, Candace Joswick, Esther Levenson, Zvia Markovits, Zemira Mevarech, Joanne Mulligan, Sherman Rosenfeld, Flavia Santamaria, Julie Sarama, Juhaina Awawdeh Shahbari, Amal Sharif-Rasslan, Tal Sharir, Nora Scheuer, Pessia Tsamir, Dina Tirosh and Ana Clara Ventura.
Author:
This book is about the reflective journey of Sharada Gade, a teacher-practitioner who turned into a researcher-practitioner. The book holds many lessons, as the author talks about her collaboration with teachers and her experience in coauthoring research reports with them. She also discusses how to teach and implement instructional interventions. This practical knowledge is supported by perspectives from cultural historical activity theory (CHAT). Such a stance offers conceptual clarity to the book's lessons by drawing from across continents, institutions and academic fields. The culmination of these efforts makes for fascinating reading, one that sheds much needed theoretical-practical light for practitioners to take transformative action in their own classrooms.
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.    
K-8 Lesson Plans for Ecological and Social Change
Eco-Mathematics Education strives to show how everyone can experience the embedded connection between mathematics and the natural world. The authors’ sincere hope is that by doing so, we can radically change the way we come to understand mathematics, as well as humanity’s place in the ecosystem. The book hopes to accomplish this by providing in-depth lesson plans and resources for educators and anyone interested in teaching and learning mathematics through an ecological aesthetic perspective. All lessons are based on the inquiry method of teaching, aligned to standards, incorporate art projects inspired by famous artists, and utilize recycled and/or natural materials as much as possible.
Over the past 50 years the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel was actively involved in all the components related to curriculum development, implementation, and research in science, mathematics, and computer science education: both learning and teaching. These initiatives are well designed and effective examples of long-term developmental and comprehensive models of reforms in the way science and mathematics are learned and taught. The 16 chapters of the book are divided into two key parts. The first part is on curriculum development in the sciences and mathematics. The second describes the implementation of these areas and its related professional development. Following these chapters, two commentaries are written by two imminent researchers in science and mathematics teaching and learning: Professor Alan Schonfeld from UC Berkeley, USA, and Professor Ilka Parchman from IPN at the University of Kiel, Germany. The book as a whole, as well as its individual chapters, are intended for a wide audience of curriculum developers, teacher educators, researchers on learning and teaching of science and mathematics and policy makers at the university level interested in advancing models of academic departments working under a common philosophy, yet under full academic freedom.

Contributors are: Abraham Arcavi, Michal Armoni, Ron Blonder, Miriam Carmeli, Jason Cooper, Rachel Rosanne Eidelman, Ruhama Even, Bat-Sheva Eylon, Alex Friedlander, Nurit Hadas, Rina Hershkowitz, Avi Hofstein, Ronnie Karsenty, Boris Koichu, Dorothy Langley, Ohad Levkovich, Smadar Levy, Rachel Mamlok-Naaman, Nir Orion, Zahava Scherz, Alan Schoenfeld, Yael Shwartz, Michal Tabach, Anat Yarden and Edit Yerushalmi.