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Volume Editors: and
Renewal of higher-education programs in US prisons creates a need for science education. This is the first book to address STEM education in prisons in the United States. It calls on activist science teachers to develop innovative ways to teach in challenging carceral settings.

Over the last fifty years, science education and prison education have moved in different directions, one expanding and the other contracting. This book brings these educational endeavors into cooperative engagement. Democratic citizenship opens opportunities for all people, irrespective of civil status, to study science. The book presents student narratives and case studies emphasizing the achievements of STEM education behind prison walls. STEM education equity can help address the deep social inequities that mass incarceration creates and magnifies.

Contributors are: Cassandra Barrett, Andrew Bell, George Bogner, Adrian Borealis, Drew Bush, Kelli Bush, Sandy Chang, Kelle Dhein, Amalia Handler, Steven Hart, Steven Henderson, Tiffany Hensley-McBain, Paul Kazelis, Joe Lockard, Edward Mei, Tsafrir Mor, Rob Scott, Laura Taylor, Joslyn Rose Trivett and Emily Webb.
Series Editor:
Technology Education has gone through a lot of changes in the past decades. It has developed from a craft oriented school subject to a learning area in which the meaning of technology as an important part of our contemporary culture is explored, both by the learning of theoretical concepts and through practical activities. This development has been accompanied by educational research. The output of research studies is published mostly as articles in scholarly Technology Education and Science Education journals. There is a need, however, for more than that. The field still lacks an international book series that is entirely dedicated to Technology Education. The International Technology Education Studies aim at providing the opportunity to publish more extensive texts than in journal articles, or to publish coherent collections of articles/chapters that focus on a certain theme.
In this book series monographs and edited volumes will be published. The books will be peer reviewed in order to assure the quality of the texts.
Series Editors: and
The Biotechnology Learning Series is aimed to bring about discussion around the introduction of biotechnology in schools and tertiary learning environments. Biotechnology is an expanding area of scientific and community interest, one that it is important students understand because of its potential to impact on them and their communities. The development of scientifically and technologically literate citizens has been almost universally welcomed as a desirable goal for education and the introduction of biotechnology in schools can contribute to this. This series will include publications on communicating biotechnology, linking schools, industry and research, case studies of classroom research in introducing biotechnology, bioethics, futures and critical thinking in biotechnology. Although the context for the series is specifically biotechnology the publications will be useful to science and technology educators internationally. The Biotechnology Learning Series arose from research and development work for The New Zealand Biotechnology Learning Hub. The Hub was developed to make modern biotechnology more accessible to school teachers and students. The issue for teachers and science and technology educators is how to provide learning experiences in this area. The Hub funded by the New Zealand Government consists primarily of an on-line portal (www.biotechlearn.org.nz) containing case studies and resources of biotechnology in action alongside teacher resources that demonstrate how biotechnology contexts can be transferred into a classroom setting to contribute to teacher and student scientific and technological literacy. The editors of the series encourage proposals from researchers in science and technology education.
Series Editors: and
Each volume in the 7-volume series The World of Science Education reviews research in a key region of the world. These regions include North-America, South and Latin America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Europe and Israel, North Africa and the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa.
In this book two fields meet, Technology Education with its long history, and Maker Education, a relative new shoot in the educational field. Both focus on learning through making and both value agency and motivation of learners. The purpose of this book is to understand and analyze the kind of informal and formal educational activities that take place under the umbrella of the Maker Movement and then relate this to the field of Technology Education to uncover what researchers, innovators and teachers in this field can learn from the principles, ideas and practices that are central to the Maker Movement and vice versa.

The book contains two types of chapters. The first type is case study chapters that span from Mexico, China, Korea, Denmark, the Netherlands to Kenya and from primary to tertiary level, showing a variety of good practices in maker education including both formal and informal contexts. In the subsequent thematic chapters, dedicated authors have used the case studies to reflect on themes such as curriculum reform, social learning, materiality, spatial thinking, informal versus formal learning as well as the sustainability of learning and relate what is happening in Maker Education with Technology Education to imagine possible futures for Maker Education.
Volume Editors: and
In an attempt to foster effective learning for the students, educators and researchers have been examining the complex relations between psychological, biological, sociological, and cultural aspects of the educative process. The common goal is to promote deep learning and maximize the potential of next-generation students in constructing knowledge, understanding, supporting, and advancing skills in their chosen fields. In the past decades, scientists and educational researchers are developing a new understanding of how the brain works and gaining knowledge of brain research that can transform how they teach in class. Recent discoveries in non-invasive brain imaging and cognitive neuroscience are providing fresh perspectives and mechanisms of learning. The chapters in this book will portray theoretical frameworks, thought-provoking ideas, and promising efforts in framing new science of learning.
Author:
Why has early childhood science education taken so long to become established as a field of research inquiry? Why do we continue to blame early childhood and primary teachers for their lack of confidence and competence in science education? This book tackles these questions and more.

Grounded in cultural-historical theory, this book explores the development of the field through the eyes of the author. Over 30 years the contexts, the questions, and the foci of a generation of science education researchers are mapped. As the field develops, new concepts, models of teaching and new methods and methodologies are theorised and empirically supported, bringing forward uniqueness of science education for children in play-based settings.
The book reflects on the extent to which the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic influenced the education system in Africa, notably South Africa. The advent of the pandemic has brought a new context to the challenges of access, deepening the precarious position of African higher education systems. The pandemic underscored that African higher education systems are fragile and not uniformly resilient. The book discusses the challenges created or further entrenched by COVID-19 and how the typology of inequality across the differentiated institutions impacted the management of education delivery during COVID-19. Per se, lessons learned were documented to inform decision-making and practice while drawing conclusions for future usage. Even though the shift to emergency remote teaching was not foreseen and thus not coordinated, the authors argue that students’ learning styles, perceptions of online learning and digital pedagogy should be considered in the post-COVID-19 curricula development processes.
Volume Editors: and
In this book, 23 contributors offer new insights on key issues in mathematics education in early childhood. The chapters cover all mathematics curriculum-related issues in early childhood (number, geometry, patterns and structures and mathematics in daily life). Special attention is given to teachers knowledge and innovative research issues such as quantifiers among young children.

Contributors are: Abraham Arcavi, Ruthi Barkai, Douglas H. Clements, Bat-Sheva Eylon, Dina Hassidov, Rina Hershkowitz, Leah Ilani, Bat-Sheva Ilany, Candace Joswick, Esther Levenson, Zvia Markovits, Zemira Mevarech, Joanne Mulligan, Sherman Rosenfeld, Flavia Santamaria, Julie Sarama, Juhaina Awawdeh Shahbari, Amal Sharif-Rasslan, Tal Sharir, Nora Scheuer, Pessia Tsamir, Dina Tirosh and Ana Clara Ventura.
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.