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From this set of critical stories emerges a timely confession from marginalized imagined communities at the physical and metaphorical Mexican-American border. These hybrid storytellers create a multivalence of experiences and genres. Composers of this ground-breaking collection draw readers into an affective connection with the borderlands, offering critical examinations of legal status, gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, social class, family, and health. Additionally, creative representations across genres explore notions of geography, vulnerability, suffering, trauma, pain as well as joy, healing, and love. By posing questions about loss of innocence, they incite new literary and visual spaces for fusing together fragments of the remains of land, body, and/or being, all the while creating a site of fresh confessions where critical stories are illuminated collages assembled together from within la línea.

Contributors are: Kiri Avelar, Irving Ayala, Carmella Braniger, Roxana Fragoso Carrillo, Marisa V. Cervantes, Guadalupe Chavez, Julio Enríquez-Ornelas, Liliana Conlisk Gallegos, Verónica Gaona, Andrea Gomez, Filiberto Mares Hernández, Víctor M. Macías-González, Carol Mariano, Ana Silvia Monzon Monterroso, Juana Moriel-Payne, Rachel Anna Neff, Jumko Ogata-Aguilar, José Olivarez, Isabela Ortega, Paul Pedroza, Omar Pimienta, Raphaella Prange, Felipe Quetzalcoatl Quintanilla, Erica Reyes, Fidel García Reyes, Lizbeth De La Cruz Santana and Santiago Vaquera-Vasquez.
This volume focuses on the different challenges of language policy in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Each of the seventeen chapters follows the same structure, ensuring readability and accessibility, and describes the unique aspects of each country. The work as a whole reveals the complex and reciprocal relations between multiple indigenous African languages, Creole languages and former colonial languages and it constitutes an opportunity to notice recurring patterns as well as distinctive characteristics.
Therefore, everyone involved in language policy, education, economics and development, geography, development or area studies and African studies will benefit from such a holistic and innovative overview.
This book series covers the entire African continent on a national scale in order to provide a holistic overview of multilingualism and the language policies. Due to its country-by-country structure all African countries receive the same attention and space. For usability purposes, the countries are grouped in the different regional economic communities (RECs):
- Volume I: SADC
- Volume II: EAC & ECCAS
- Volume III: ECOWAS
- Volume IV: AMU & COMESA
These volumes of the series focus primarily on language-in-education policies (LiEP). The book series aims to describe and analyse the diverse challenges of LiEP for the entire African continent using a standard structure for each chapter to ensure readability. Book chapters will be mainly contributed by authors based in Africa.
Over the years, translation has increasingly become a necessary tool to function in contemporary society. Based on years of research and teaching activity within the field, this book offers a useful and effective paradigm for the translation of different types of texts, guiding readers towards the realisation of effective translation projects. The several contrastive analyses presented and the suggestions offered throughout will help readers appreciate the implications and consequences of every translation choice, encouraging them to develop reading and translating skills applicable to the variety of texts they face in everyday life, from novels to comic books, films, and television series.
Series Editor: Paul Thomas
This series explores in separate volumes major authors and genres through a critical literacy lens that seeks to offer students opportunities as readers and writers to embrace and act upon their own empowerment. Each volume will challenge authors (along with examining authors that are themselves challenging) and genres as well as challenging norms and assumptions associated with those authors' works and genres themselves. Further, each volume will confront teachers, students, and scholars by exploring all texts as politically charged mediums of communication. The work of critical educators and scholars will guide each volume, including concerns about silenced voices and texts, marginalized people and perspectives, and normalized ways of being and teaching that ultimately dehumanize students and educators.
Volume Editors: Rosemary Sage and Riccarda Matteucci
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Education was established to create employees for 19th and 20th century manufacturing models. The 21st century requires a rethink. Change is happening fast, with jobs not guaranteed as robots are taking over routines. We must prepare students for uncertainty & higher-level employment – helping them think and communicate instead of retain and recall facts for passing exams. Some curricula is either irrelevant for today or gained at the press of a button. Listening and literate talk (narratives) for collaboratively solving real problems should be the focus, not facts forgotten after tests. The book explores this important debate.

Contributors are: Daryle Abrahams, Nigel Adams, Peter Chatterton, Stefano Cobello, Joanna Ebner, Pierre Frath, Irene Glendinning, Susan James, Riccarda Matteucci, Gloria McGregor, Elena Milli, Elizabeth Negus, Juan Eduardo Romero, Rosemary Sage and Emma Webster.
Ethnographers spend a tremendous amount of time in the field, collecting all sorts of empirical material—but how do they turn their work into books or articles that people actually want to read? This concise, engaging guide will help academic writers at all levels to write better. Many ethnography textbooks focus more on the ‘ethno’ portion of our craft, and less on developing our ‘graph’ skills. Gullion fills that gap, helping ethnographers write compelling, authentic stories about their fieldwork. From putting the first few words on the page, to developing a plot line, to publishing, Writing Ethnography offers guidance for all stages of the writing process.
Benjamin Bowen Carter as an Agent of Global Knowledge
Author: Man Shun Yeung
Benjamin Bowen Carter (1771-1831), one of the first Americans to speak and read Chinese, studied Chinese in Canton and advocated its use in diplomacy decades before America established a formal relationship with China. Drawing on rediscovered manuscripts, this book reconstructs Carter’s multilingual learning experience, reveals how he helped translate a diplomatic document into Chinese, describes his interactions with European sinologists, and traces his attempts to convince the US government and American academics of the practical and cultural value of Chinese studies. The cross-cultural perspective employed in this book emphasizes the reciprocal dynamics of Carter’s relationships with Chinese and European “others,” while Carter’s story itself forces a rewriting of the earliest years of US-China relations.
Volume Editor: Vicki Stewart Collet
This volume is a valuable reference for literacy scholars and educators. In this encyclopaedic reference of prominent literacy terms, you will find citations of theorists and research findings to validate the content and lead you into a deeper dive for those terms of particular interest. Whether read cover to cover to provide an overview of the field or used as a side-table reference, The Language of Literacy Education offers valid, current information about important topics in the field. The 297 indexed terms expand our 87 main entries to encompass relevant terms in literacy education.

Contributors are: Johnny B. Allred, Leah R. Cheek, Vicki Stewart Collet, Rebecca Carpenter de Cortina, Judy L. Fields, Seth D. French, Savanna L. Gragg, Angelia C. Greiner, Megan Yates Grizzle, Kathryn Hackett-Hill, Holly Sheppard Riesco, Afton Schleiff and Wyann Stanton.
Author: Nancy A. Wasser
“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many of them claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, Nancy A. Wasser argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

Wasser explains how teaching and regular practicing of writing skills from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to more balance between teacher and children voices.