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With the view of improving doctoral education, contributors from diverse cultural, political and disciplinary contexts critically analyse challenges and opportunities that impact on the experience of researchers and university staff. Readers are invited to consider their own circumstances and how the presented policies, procedures, values and practices, both common and unique, might either detract from or enhance their performance and well-being. Reflection on lessons learned through the pandemic are incorporated, reinforcing the value of collaboration and mutual respect between researchers and their supporters at all levels, for both the conduct of good science and a fulfilled work life.

Contributors are: Britt-Marie Apelgren, Diogo Casanova, Pam Denicolo, Shane Dowle, Dawn Duke, Fabiane Garcia, Martin Gough, Erika Hansson, Gill Houston, Isabel Huet, Sverker Lindblad, Bing Lu, Alistair McCulloch, Marie-Louise Österlind, Julie Reeves, Manuela Schmidt, Matthew Sillence and Gun-Britt Wärvik.
How the Education System Reacted to the First Wave of Covid-19
The nine chapters in this book explore how the Italian education system responded to distance learning during the first wave of the pandemic. The impact of the hard lockdown on both teaching and learning revealed the inherent weaknesses of a system in which digital technology had only recently been introduced and highlighted the relevant inequalities in their access and use. While students, teachers and families adapted (albeit with difficulty) to the new learning and teaching routines, the institutions faced the challenge of ensuring quality and equality.

By including various case studies and unedited sets of data collected in different areas of the country, the book offers up-to-date insights on the impact of the pandemic on the Italian school system and provides a broad introduction to the educational emergency from a sociological perspective. The volume ends with a post-commentary comparing the Italian case with the similar situation of school closure as it occurred in the United Kingdom.

Contributors are: Paolo Barabanti, Eduardo Barberis, Nico Bazzoli, Rita Bertozzi, Stefania Capogna, Gianna Cappello, Domenico Carbone, Maddalena Colombo, Joselle Dagnes, Maria Chiara De Angelis, Maurizio Merico, Diego Mesa, Flaminia Musella, Francesco Ramella, Marco Romito, Michele Rostan, Mariagrazia Santagati, Tatiana Saruis, Fausta Scardigno, Spyros Themelis, Massimiliano Vaira and Martina Visentin.
Volume Editors: Julie Hansen and Ingela Nilsson
What does power abuse look and feel like in the academic world? How does it affect university faculty, students, education and research? What can we do to counteract and prevent power abuse? These questions are addressed in this collection of autobiographical poems, essays and illustrations about academia. The contributors reflect on individual experiences as well as underlying institutional structures, providing original perspectives on bullying, sexual harassment, discrimination, and other forms of power abuse in academic workplaces. They share their stories in order to break the culture of silence around power abuse in academia and point out pathways for constructive change.
In this book, Judith Norris presents a theoretical model that demonstrates a new approach to understanding how school leaders respond to conflicting expectations and demands. The idea of sensemaking and sensegiving is theoretically interesting and allows the reader to focus on how school leaders make sense, but also how they give sense to others in the complex conditions that educators now must negotiate. Like the Eucalyptus tree, educational leaders must adapt to their contradictory environments.

Written in the most accessible way, the theory and its application will likely appeal not only to researchers, but also to teachers and school administrators. Norris has created a real applicability to school leadership in various international contexts.
Collaborative engagement between activist academics from Israel and Northern Ireland highlighted the challenges and potential of working through education to promote shared learning and shared life in divided societies. Following these initial explorations, the volume brought together educationalists from Europe, the United States and South Africa to widen the range of experience and insights, and broaden the base of the conversation. The result is this book on the role of shared education, not only in deeply divided societies, but also in places where minorities face discrimination, where migrants face prejudice and barriers, or where society fails to deal positively with cultural diversity. Together, the contributors challenged themselves to develop theoretical and practical paradigms, based on practical knowledge and experience, to promote activist pedagogies. Their shared purpose was to work for more humane, just and democratic societies, in which education offers genuine hope for sustained transformational change.

The four main themes around which the book is organized are: educating for democratic-multicultural citizenship, models of shared learning, nurturing intercultural competencies, and reconciling dialogue in the face of conflicting narratives. The book draws on a wide range of international perspectives and insights to identify practical strategies for change in local contexts.
Volume Editors: Swapna Kumar and Patricia Arnold
Are you looking for evidence-based hands-on approaches to quality assurance in online programs in higher education? Then this is the book you are looking for. Quality in Online Programs includes approaches and practices to creating and maintaining quality in online programs from across disciplines, institutions, and countries. In this book, leaders in the field of online higher education share their lessons learned using customized approaches to online program quality, student support, and faculty development. These cases will be useful to those seeking to adopt or adapt such practices in their own contexts. The authors also focus on quality assurance at the program level, which has not often been addressed before and which is crucial to ensure faculty satisfaction, program outcomes, and a successful student experience.

Contributors are: Beverly Araújo Dawson, Patricia Arnold, Alexandra Bitton-Bailey, Bettyjo Bouchey, Elizabeth Counselman-Carpenter, Michelle Dennis, Henrik Dindas, Cathy DuBois, Jo Anne Durovich, Sarah Fornero, John C. Gillham, Michael Graham, Amy Grincewicz, Montse Guitert, James D. Halbert, Paul Huckett, Kevin Hulen, Swapna Kumar, Nikki Lyons, Olysha Magruder, Bernhard Minke, Steven T. Nagel, Marleigh L. Perez, Jennifer L. Plahovinsak, Amy Poland, Mary L. Raber Johnson, Teresa Romeu, Albert Sangrà, Frank P. Schulte, Zaina Sheets, Bethany Simunich, Alfredo Soeiro, Nicole V. Williams and Veronica Wilson.
Volume Editor: Lauren Cifuentes
Winner of the Distance Education Book Award!

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The rapid rise of e-learning worldwide means that campuses are creating new positions in distance learning leadership, often at the vice-president or vice-provost level. Frequently, those applying for such positions are recently graduated doctoral students or faculty members who have never served in administration. Unlike any other book to date, this Guide to Administering Online Learning provides easy access to an overview of tasks to be accomplished or maintained and perspectives to consider in order to direct dynamic online initiatives. In it, experienced distance learning teachers and administrators share their insights regarding what must be done to administer effective online learning, including theoretical insights as well as practical principles. They provide comprehensive guidelines for addressing issues and needs that distance learning administrators currently face: barriers to adoption, policies, legalities, ethics, strategic planning, emerging technologies, design of professional development, management of the course development process, quality assurance, student support, and recruitment and marketing. This book is a timely offering from those who have effectively led distance learning initiatives for those who are interested in leading distance learning for the next generation of learners. Each chapter includes questions, prompts, or activities to help readers relate the concept to their own experiences.
Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators
Volume Editors: John H. Curry and Sean R. Jackson
Informal learning experiences drive many into the education realm. For some, the opportunity to coach young people in sports or other extra-curricular programs is what motivates them to get out of bed in the morning. It is in these contexts that young people acquire some of the lessons that have stood the tests of time in their memory, and formulated their being. It is these moments that we hope to capture and pass on through this collective work.
The Greatest Lecture I Was Never Taught: Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators asks educators from all sectors (K12, Higher Education, Educational Administrators, Medical, Military, Coaching, etc.) to reflect on these moments and help us pass them on. Some took this as an opportunity to finally thank a mentor. Others presented information on what shaped their priorities; and still others just wanted to tell a story. Whatever their motivation, this collection should serve as an investigation on how the informal teaching moments are a leader’s and mentor’s greatest tool.
Volume Editor: Chris Brink
Around the world, higher education is faced with a fundamental question: what is the basis for our claim of societal legitimacy? In this book, the authors go beyond the classical response regarding teaching, research and community engagement. Instead, the editor puts forward the proposition that the answer lies in responsiveness, the extent to which universities respond, or fail to respond, to societal challenges. Moreover, because of its intractable legacy issues and crisis of inequality, the question regarding the societal legitimacy of universities is particularly clearly manifested in South Africa, one of the most unequal countries in the world.

The Responsive University brings together contributions on the issue of responsiveness from a number of international university leaders, half of them specifically addressing the South African situation within the context of the international situation as presented by the other authors.

In the global discussion about the role of universities in society, this book provides a conceptual framework for a way forward.
Volume Editors: Nian Cai Liu, Yan Wu, and Qi Wang
The Eighth International Conference on World-Class Universities was held in October 2019. The conference theme was “World-Class Universities: Global Trends and Institutional Models”.

The theme of this volume is embedded in the context of an ever-changing and complex world. Changes are taking place constantly in social, economic, cultural and political spheres, such as technological transformation, backlash against globalization and emerging forces of nationalism in various parts of the world, as well as increasing inequality and disparity of wealth, economic and social opportunities. These challenges impact global, national and institutional higher education practices and induce mounting pressure on World-Class Universities to respond effectively to the ferocity of social change.

World-Class Universities, commonly recognized as global research universities or flagship universities, are essential in developing a nation’s potential in the knowledge economy and in seeking conceptual and practical solutions to daunting challenges. This volume sheds light on World-Class Universities’ challenges, opportunities, roles and strategies in response to the changing landscape of higher education and our society as a whole. It is composed of two parts: “Global Trends” and “Institutional Models”.