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Often considered as the first phenomenon of mass media in history, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of these supports by the partisans of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries.

The twelve contributors provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy of the Spanish Low Countries and underlines the mutually beneficial relationship between proponents of the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. It is therefore also an important contribution to our understanding of sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
Series Editors: Jutta Ernst and Oliver Scheiding
Studies in Periodical Cultures (SPC) contributes to the bourgeoning field of periodical studies, exploring magazines, newspapers, and other forms of serialized media in (trans)national contexts. Research into periodicals is of high interest to many because of the medium’s pervasiveness and its enmeshment with the formation of cultural identities. This book series considers periodicals as important artifacts, seeking to assess their role for processes of cultural transfer and translation. SPC looks at how periodicals evolve in and through networks of people, material infrastructures, media markets, and changing technologies. Likewise, the community-building potential of periodicals will be considered. SPC wants to determine what function periodicals have as sites of affection, but also as aesthetic and material sources for the arts and literature. The book series produces a much-needed bridge between historical/archival approaches and present work in the field of media studies by highlighting the legacies and trajectories of the periodical business from 18th-century print to the digital age.

SPC invites contributions from a range of disciplines including approaches developed in the humanities and social sciences. Transnational approaches to periodical studies, which provide, among others, fresh insights into foreign language publications, the role of international editions, the ethnic press, and related issues like race, gender, and sexuality are all welcome. SPC also promotes the ‘business turn’ in periodical studies and highlights material and legal frameworks, design, translation, marketing and consumption. It solicits studies about editorial procedures, the distribution, and the reception of periodicals. This book series encourages work about regional, national, and transnational communication networks, investigating, for instance, how rival publications and their interrelated dynamics shape the periodicals’ formal, material, and visual attributes. In practice, SPC proposes to study periodicals less as autonomous objects, but rather as agents embedded in changing historical contexts. SPC thus offers theoretical and methodological approaches to an interdisciplinary, transnational conception of periodical studies, and publishes peer-reviewed volumes in different languages.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
We strongly recommend the use of the Chicago Manual of Style in this series.

Subject areas for exploration:
Periodicals and Transculturality
Literary Magazines as Transnational Periodicals
Transnational Periodicals and the Ethnic Press
Transnational Periodicals, Typography, and Graphic Communication
Transnational Periodicals and the Production of Knowledge
Periodical Studies and the Impact of the Archive
Regionalism and Transnational Periodicals
Editor: Islam Dayeh
Philogical Encounters Monographs is dedicated to the historical and philosophical critique of philology. The series encourages critical and comparative perspectives that integrate textual scholarship and the study of language from across the world. The series is open to contributions in all fields studying the history of textual practices, hermeneutics and philology, philological controversies, and the intellectual and global history of writing, archiving, tradition-making and publishing. Neither confined to any discipline nor bound by any geographical or temporal limits, the series takes as its point of departure the growing concern with the global significance of philology and the potential of historically conscious and politically critical philology to challenge exclusivist notions of the self and the canon.

Philological Encounters Monographs is a supplement to the journal Philological Encounters
A Descriptive Bibliography of the Works Published in the Seventeenth Century
In Printing Spinoza Jeroen van de Ven systematically examines all seventeenth-century printed editions of Spinoza’s writings, published between 1663 and 1694, as well as their variant ‘issues’. In focus are Spinoza’s 1663 adumbration of René Descartes’s ‘Principles of Philosophy’ with his own ‘Metaphysical Thoughts’, the ‘Theological-Political Treatise’ (1670), and the posthumous writings (1677), including the famously-known ‘Ethics’.
Van de Ven’s descriptive bibliography studies, contextualizes, and records all aspects of the publication history of Spinoza’s writings from manuscript to print and assesses their immediate reception. It discusses the printed books’ codicology, philology, typographical and textual relationships, illustration programmes, as well as their dissemination in early Enlightenment Europe, in view of the physical aspects of 1,246 extant copies and their provenance.
This is the first study of Jacobean Scotland's largest library: the collection assembled over several generations by the Lindsays of Balcarres. It challenges prior understandings of pre-Union Scotland's book culture, presents the catalogue of a collection of international importance for the first time, and recovers the intellectual history behind this "Great Bibliotheck".
The volume includes chapters on the history of the library to the Restoration (Jane Stevenson) and from Restoration to Enlightenment (Kelsey Jackson Williams) as well as a detailed discussion of the library's reconstruction (William Zachs and Jackson Williams), a full catalogue, and appendices.
Author: Martin McNamara
Contributor: Michael Martin
This book aims at bringing together and providing all the information available on the Bible in the early Irish church (A.D. 550-850), drawing on some sources not well known for this subject, such as Columbanus, the early writer Apponius, St Gall list of works in Irish script, and the Libri scottice scripti. The beginnings are stressed after which the biblical compositions for three following centuries are given. The direct links of Irish literal Psalm interpretation with the fourth-century Antioch on the Orontes school are made clear, as is the presence of apocryphal and extra biblical, and possibly Jewish, tradition, in the poems of Blathmac and other Irish compositions.
Editor: Dragos Calma
Reading Proclus and the Book of Causes, published in three volumes, is a fresh, comprehensive understanding of the history of Neoplatonism from the 9th to the 16th century. This third volume gathers contributions on key concepts of the Platonic tradition (Proclus, Plotinus, Porphyry or Sallustius) inherited and reinterpreted by Arabic (e.g. Avicenna, the Book of Causes), Byzantine (e.g. Maximus the Confessor, Ioane Petritsi) and Latin authors (e.g. Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Berthold of Moosburg, Marsilio Ficino etc.). Two major themes are presently studied: causality (in respect to the One, the henads, the self-constituted substances and the first being) and the noetic triad (being-life-intellect).
An Iconological Analysis of the Relationships between Art, Science and Power
In Early Modern Thesis Prints in the Southern Netherlands, Gwendoline de Mûelenaere offers an account of the practice of producing illustrated thesis prints in the seventeenth-century Southern Low Countries. She argues that the evolution of the thesis print genre gave rise to the creation of a specific visual language combining efficiently various figurative registers of a historical and symbolic nature. The book offers a reflection on the representation of knowledge and its public recognition in the context of academic defenses.

Early Modern Thesis Prints makes a timely contribution to our understanding of early modern print culture and more specifically to the expanding field of study concerned with the role of visual materials in early modern thought.