Ein interkultureller Vergleich zwischen dem Philanthropinum in Dessau und dem Colegio de las Vizcaínas in Mexiko-Stadt
Author: Eva Rautenberg
Aufklärung und Schule, Männer und Frauen in Dessau und in Mexiko. Eine kulturhistorische Betrachtung und Darstellung einer facettenreichen und vielfältigen Wirklichkeit.
Thematisiert werden Szenen des Alltags und des Schullebens, die in zwei verschiedenen westlichen Kontexten zur Zeit der Aufklärung stattfanden: Dessau und Neuspanien bzw. das koloniale Mexiko. In dieser Ausführung zeigen sich die Macht- und Herrschaftsverhältnisse, die sowohl innerhalb der politischen Kontrolle als auch im Bereich des Akademischen ausgeübt wurden. Das Werk versteht sich als ein alternativer methodologischer Ansatz für die Vergleichende Pädagogik.
Zur Kritik materialistischer Bildungstheorie und -praxis
Author: Roger Behrens
Die Debatten über Bildung und Erziehung sowie deren Sinn und Zweck haben Konjunktur. Obwohl unter einem allgemeinen Vorzeichen der Kritik stehend, spielt eine materialistische Bildungstheorie und -praxis in diesen Debatten keine Rolle mehr.
Noch in den 1970er Jahren gingen von der kritischen Theorie der Bildung, Erziehung und Pädagogik entscheidende Impulse aus; mit kritischen Konzepten wie »materialistische Bildungstheorie« oder »dialektische Pädagogik« konnte das humanistische Bildungsideal auch praktisch aktualisiert werden (antiautoritäre Erziehung, Kinderladenbewegung, freie Schulen etc.). Allerdings sind solche gesellschaftlichen Interventionen heute restlos integriert, die kritischen Motive weitgehend absorbiert, entschärft oder schlechterdings vergessen. Eingebettet in eine kritische Begriffs- und Gesellschaftsanalyse rekonstruiert die Studie historisch und systematisch dieses »Scheitern«, beleuchtet aber auch das »Machbare« einer materialistischen Bildungstheorie und -praxis.
Author: Ralf Koerrenz
Es gibt eine spezifisch hebräische Kultur der Bildung – das ist der Leitgedanke dieser Grundlegung. In dieser Kultur der Bildung spielt neben Aspekten wie Freiheit und Individualität ein bestimmtes Verständnis der Verantwortung des Menschen gegenüber sich selbst, der Mitwelt und der Umwelt eine entscheidende Rolle.
Dabei wird der Mensch als ein Wesen verstanden, das von der unaufhebbaren Gleichzeitigkeit von Entfremdung (Sünde) und Freiheit (als Befreiung) geprägt ist. Mit »hebräisch« wird dabei ein kultureller Überlieferungskontext bezeichnet, der sich in den Schriften der hebräischen Bibel gebündelt hat. Schöpfung und Sündenfall, Befreiung und prophetische Kulturkritik werden mit Blick auf das Bildungsmotiv anthropologisch ausgedeutet. Insgesamt entfaltet der Hebräische Humanismus nicht nur ein Verständnis von Kultur und Bildung, sondern kann insgesamt als eine bestimmte Ausprägung einer Kultur der Bildung verstanden werden. Der Hebräische Humanismus bildet die gemeinsame Grundlage für entsprechende Strömungen im Judentum, Christentum und Islam.
The Lost Mirror traces cultural patterns in which the interpretation of learning and education was developed against the backdrop of Hebrew thought.

The appreciation of learning is deeply rooted in the Hebrew way of thinking. Learning is understood as an open and history-conscious engagement of man with culture. The consciousness of history is shaped by the motif of the unavailability of the “other” and the difference to this “other”. This “other” is traditionally remembered as “God”, but may also be reflected in the motifs of the other person or the other society. The Lost Mirror reminds us
of a deficit, which is that in our everyday thinking and everyday action, we usually hide, forget and partly suppress the meaning and presence of the unavailable other. The book approaches this thinking through portraits of people such as Hannah Arendt, Leo Baeck, Walter Benjamin, Agnes Heller, Emanuel Levinas, and others.
From the 16th through to the 18th century, printed disputations were the main academic output of universities. This genre is especially attractive as it deals with the most significant cultural and scientific innovations of the early modern period, such as the printing revolution, and the development of new methods in philosophy, education and scholarly exchange (via personal networks).
Until recently, academic disputations have attracted comparatively little scholarly attention. This volume provides for the first time a comprehensive study of the early modern disputation culture, both through theoretical discussions and overviews, and numerous case studies that analyze particular features of disputations in various European regions.
Education, Crisis, Diachronicity and the Transition to a Sustainable Future
This work contributes to education for sustainability with innovative pedagogy and a new conceptual approach. It is based on a realistic assessment of our future in the Anthropocene, based on principles of human security and scientific models of remaining safe operating space. It critiques current approaches to education for sustainability and highlights solutions.
A chapter on the ethics of sustainability education provides the conceptual basis for a taxonomy of learning outcomes and a section on how educators can implement it in the classroom. The book integrates environmental ethics, zero growth and climate mitigation into a blueprint to educate successfully for a Great Transition to a truly sustainable future.
This edited volume adopts a new angle on the study of Spanish in the United States, one that transcends the use of Spanish as an ethnic language and explores it as a language spreading across new domains: education, public spaces, and social media. It aims to position Spanish in the United States in the wider frame of global multilingualism and in line with new perspectives of analysis such as superdiversity, translanguaging, indexicality, and multimodality. All the 15 chapters analyze Spanish use as an instance of social change in the sense that monolingual cultural reproduction changes and produces cultural transformation. Furthermore, these chapters represent five macro-regions of the United States: the Southwest, the West, the Midwest, the Northeast, and the Southeast.
In Critical Reflection on Research in Teaching and Learning, the editors bring together a collection of works that explore a wide range of concerns related to questions of researching teaching and learning in higher education and shine a light on the diversity of qualitative methods in practice. This book uniquely focuses on reflections of practice where researchers expose aspects of their work that might otherwise fit neatly into ‘traditional’ methodologies chapters or essays, but are nonetheless instructive – issues, events, and thoughts that deserve to be highlighted rather than buried in a footnote. This collection serves to make accessible the importance of teaching and learning issues related to learners, teachers, and a variety of contexts in which education work happens.

Contributors are: David Andrews, Candace D. Bloomquist, Agnes Bosanquet, Beverley Hamilton, Henriette Tolstrup Holmegaard, Klondiana Kolomitro,Outi Kyrö-Ämmälä, Suvi Lakkala, Rod Lane, Corrine Laverty, Elizabeth Lee, Körkkö Minna, Narell Patton, Jessica Raffoul, Nicola Simmons, Jee Su Suh, Kim West, and Cherie Woolmer.
Lessons Learned from Reading the Signs
Semiotics has explained the cognitive mechanisms of a complex, subtle and important phenomenon affecting all human interactions and communications across socio-cultural, socio-economic groups. Semiotics has captured a durable and enriching functionality from multiple disciplines including psychology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, marketing and their multidisciplinary off-spring, such as, educational psychology, consumer psychology, visual literacy, media studies, etc. Semiotic treatises have explored critical factors affecting the relationship between any intended message and the message recipient’s interpretation. The factors that shape interpretation inherently affect learning and often directly affect learner engagement with the content. Learning environments have been culturally-laden communication experiences which academics, largely segmented by discipline, have described but often cloaked in semiotic jargon.

Each chapter integrates example after example of semiotics in everyday activities and events, such as stories, graphics, movies, games, infographics, and educational strategies. The chapters also present the most salient semiotic features for learning environments. The book describes semiotics as a communications phenomenon with practical implications for educators to enhance courses and programs with semiotic features in any educational environment but especially in mediated e-learning environments.
Author: Jean Laight
Large numbers of teachers have left the profession because teaching has become so time-consuming due to excessive workload. With so many women teachers leaving the profession, the author examines why some women teachers were not only staying in the profession but also giving up their time and energy to engage in trade union activism as a form of resistance against the raft of policy changes which they believe to be the root cause for the exodus. Exploring Narratives of Women Teacher Trade Union Activists attempts to discover why they are so motivated.

Narrative analysis is employed as the methodology in conjunction with a life history interview approach. This volume cites the work of Zembylas and Foucault, focusing on emotion and affect in education, political and social justice, teacher identity, teachers’ self-formation, the emotional labour of teaching, resistance and power, which is rooted in the social theory of post-structuralism. The author explores the strained relationship between teachers and government and how teacher professionalism is being perceived as an act of resistance in itself.